300 episodios

The London School of Economics and Political Science public events podcast series is a platform for thought, ideas and lively debate where you can hear from some of the world's leading thinkers. Listen to more than 200 new episodes every year.

LSE: Public lectures and events London School of Economics and Political Science

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The London School of Economics and Political Science public events podcast series is a platform for thought, ideas and lively debate where you can hear from some of the world's leading thinkers. Listen to more than 200 new episodes every year.

    The European Central Bank Between the Financial Crisis and Populisms: a conversation with Ewald Nowotny

    The European Central Bank Between the Financial Crisis and Populisms: a conversation with Ewald Nowotny

    Contributor(s): Dr Sebastian Diessner, Dr Corrado Macchiarelli, Mara Monti, Professor Ewald Nowotny, Professor Claudia Wiesner | The ECB's actions during the crisis were of immediate political importance, not only for the financial and banking sector but for the European Union and its legitimacy altogether.
    Drawing on different experiences, Sebastian Diessner, Corrado Macchiarelli, Mara Monti and Claudia Wiesner offer a detailed analytical narrative of the ECB's reaction to the financial crisis and of monetary policymaking conduct during its most fraught moments. In the broader context of the EU economic governance, the book sets a particular focus on the relation of crisis’ governance to changes in public opinion in the EU, and, explicitly, public support of the ECB, to conclude with a reflection on the challenges lying ahead for the conduct of the EMU monetary policy.
    Sebastian Diessner (@SebDiessner) is Max Weber Fellow at the European University Institute.
    Corrado Macchiarelli (@CMacchiarelli) is a Principal Economist at the National Institute of Economic and Social Research (NIESR).
    Mara Monti (@MaraMonti2) is a visiting fellow at the LSE European Institute.
    Ewald Nowotny is an Austrian economist and Social Democratic politician, former governor of Austria's central bank Oesterreichische Nationalbank and former member of the European Central Bank’s Governing Council.
    Claudia Wiesner is Professor for Political Science at Fulda University of Applied Sciences.
    Waltraud Schelkle is Professor in Political Economy at the LSE European Institute.
    You can order the book, The European Central Bank Between the Financial Crisis and Populisms (UK delivery only) from our official LSE Events independent book shop, Pages of Hackney.
    The European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector.
    Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEECB

    • 1h 28 min
    The Human in Human Rights

    The Human in Human Rights

    Contributor(s): Professor Craig Calhoun | In the first in a series of three lectures, Craig Calhoun will discuss the problems which arise from putting a secular conception of the human at its centre for our normative and political imagination. These problems are thrown into relief by contemporary discussions about artificial intelligence and new technologies.
    Craig Calhoun (@craigjcalhoun) is Professor of Social Sciences at Arizona State University and Centennial Professor at LSE. He is also a previous director of LSE.
    Monika Krause is an Associate Professor of Sociology in the Department of Sociology and co-Director of LSE Human Rights.
    LSE Human Rights (@LSEHumanRights) is a trans-disciplinary centre of excellence for international academic research, teaching and critical scholarship on human rights.
    Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSECalhoun

    • 1h 26 min
    50 Years on From the Founding of the Gay Liberation Front: progress made since and applicability today

    50 Years on From the Founding of the Gay Liberation Front: progress made since and applicability today

    Contributor(s): Dr Jacob Breslow, Angela Mason, Dr Gillian Murphy, Professor Jeffrey Weeks | The GLF was formed as an international activist movement for the liberation of LGBT people after the Stonewall Riots in New York in 1969. The event will look back at its founding and early history and examine what progress has been made since and what learnings we can apply to the challenges the LGBTQ+ community faces today.
    Part of the event will include a short presentation from LSE’s archives that will be given by Dr Gillian Murphy, the Curator for Equality, Rights and Citizenship at LSE Library.
    Jacob Breslow (@jlbreslow) is Assistant Professor of Sexuality and Gender at the LSE Department of Gender Studies. He is author of Ambivalent Childhoods: Speculative Futures and the Psychic Life of the Child, forthcoming with the University of Minnesota Press (2021). 
    Angela Mason is Labour councillor for Cantelowes ward and Camden’s Cabinet Member for Best Start for Children and Families, a founder member of the Gay Liberation Front, and Executive Director Stonewall 1992-2002. Angela is an alumnus of LSE and was made an Honorary Fellow of the School in 2011.
    Gillian Murphy is the Curator for Equality, Rights and Citizenship at LSE Library. She moved to LSE with the Women’s Library in 2013, where she had worked as an archivist for many years. Gillian promotes the Women’s Library collection and the Hall-Carpenter Archives through exhibitions, talks, blogs and workshops.
    Jeffrey Weeks joined LSE as a research assistant in October 1970, and a few weeks later he got involved in GLF, taking part in the first demo in Highbury Fields in November. Involvement on the gay liberation movement changed his life. In the 1970s he was a pioneer of LGBT history, writing an account of the emergence of the movement, Coming Out. This was the first of many books on the history and sociology of LGBT life in particular and sexuality in general. 
    Minouche Shafik, Director of the London School of Economics and Political Science, will deliver welcoming remarks at this celebration.
    Rishi Madlani (@RishiMadlani) is Head of Sustainable Finance and Just Transition for the NatWest Group and is the Global Co-Chair of their Rainbow Network, the staff network for LGBT staff and allies. 

    • 1h 30 min
    Democracy and the Supreme Court: judges and the politicians

    Democracy and the Supreme Court: judges and the politicians

    Contributor(s): Dr Paul Apostolidis | The settled position of law and the judges in our constitution has undergone very severe stress testing over the last five years, through Brexit and coronavirus. Those two crises demonstrate the dominance of the executive, who as coronavirus demonstrates can change the law at will if circumstances demand it, and the dominance of politics – if the politicians don’t like the limits set by the law they will not only change the law, they may change the constitution to neuter the judges. How much at risk is the rule of law? And what should we do about it? Has politics prevented us from defending the rule of law? The lecture will set out the threat which is real, the consequences which are dire, and the steps we can take both to form a coalition which defends the rule of law and the specific constitutional changes needed to embed the rule of law.
    Charlie Falconer (@LordCFalconer) is an English qualified barrister and partner based in Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher’s London office. The former UK Lord Chancellor and first Secretary of State for Justice spent 25 years as a commercial barrister, becoming a QC in 1991.
    Paul Apostolidis is Associate Professorial Lecturer and Deputy Head of Department for Education in the Department of Government at LSE.
    This discussion was hosted in partnership with Benjamin Franklin House, the world's only remaining home of Benjamin Franklin open to the public as a museum and educational facility.
    The Department of Government (@LSEGovernment) is a world-leading centre for study and research in politics and government.
    Twitter Hashtag for this event: #LSEDemocracy

    • 55 min
    Evaluating the Impact of Labour Market Reforms in Greece during 2010-2018

    Evaluating the Impact of Labour Market Reforms in Greece during 2010-2018

    Contributor(s): Professor Nikos Vettas | In the context of three consecutive bail out programs, the Greek state legislated and implemented various reforms aiming to restore its fiscal sustainability and external competitiveness. In this context, the most significant and radical structural reforms took place in the labour market. This public lecture will evaluate the impact of Greek labour market reforms on microeconomic incentives of individuals in relation to entering the formal labour market and estimate the impact of labour market reforms on selected macroeconomic and social indicators.
    Nikos Vettas is the General Director of the Foundation for Economic and Industrial Research (IOBE) since 2013 and a Professor at the Athens University of Economics and Business since 2003, where he has served as the Chairman of the Economics Department and a member of the University Council. Has a Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania and has been an Associate Professor at Duke University and a visiting Professor at INSEAD. He serves as Associate Editor of the International Journal of Industrial Organization, a Research Fellow at CEPR, and member of the Executive Committee of the European Association for Research in Industrial Economics. He has been an Associate Editor of the Journal of the European Economic Association and of the Journal of Industrial Economics, a member of the Hellenic Competition Commission and of the Economic Advisory Group for Competition Policy at the EC. Since 2002, a co-organizer of the annual Conference for Research on Economic Theory and Econometrics. His research has been published in leading journals such as the International Economic Review, European Economic Review, Rand Journal of Economics, and the Review of Economic Studies. He is co-editor of “Beyond Austerity: Reforming the Greek Economy”, MIT Press, 2017.
    Vassilis Monastiriotis is an economist and economic geographer by training, specialising in three areas of Labour Economics, Economic Geography and Political Economy. He has significant policy engagement on all three areas, including appointments in Experts Committees (e.g., on Regional Incentives policy and on Minimum Wage policy in Greece) and work with international bodies such as the European Commission (DG Regio, DG EMPL, DG EAC), the CEFTA Secretariat and the EBRD. He has published widely in economics and regional science journals, including Oxford Economic Papers, the British Journal of Industrial Relations, Journal of Regional Science, Regional Studies, Urban Studies, and others.
    The Hellenic Observatory (@HO_LSE) is internationally recognised as one of the premier research centres on contemporary Greece and Cyprus. It engages in a range of activities, including developing and supporting academic and policy-related research; organisation of conferences, seminars and workshops; academic exchange through visiting fellowships and internships; as well as teaching at the graduate level through LSE's European Institute.

    • 1h 34 min
    Young People and (anti-) Racism: whose lives matter in Europe?

    Young People and (anti-) Racism: whose lives matter in Europe?

    Contributor(s): Dr Manmit Bhambra, Hiba Latreche, Magid Magid, Dr Emilia Zenzile Roig | In Europe, racism is often dismissed as an issue of the past, the others, or the extremes. People of colour, activists, and academics alike have long challenged this view. Now, in the wake of global protests against racism and police brutality, European publics at large have also been called to reckon with the role of race on the continent. This panel will discuss how racism has deeply shaped both European past and present and how young people today can determine how it’ll shape Europe’s future.
    Asking whose lives matter in Europe, the event will explore issues of European identity, religion, politics, and migration. The speakers will discuss young people’s role in anti-racist activism as well as the experiences of young people of colour. Most fundamentally, the panel will not only talk about who gets to be European in Europe today, but what it could mean to belong to Europe tomorrow.
    Manmit Bhambra (@BhambraManmit) is the Research Officer of the Religion and Global Society research unit and is coordinating its inaugural project, Strengthening Religious Cooperation in Global London. Her research interests are centred around identity politics and formation, ethnic, religious and national identities as well as the broader themes of race, inclusion and minority rights. She has recently worked on research projects with young people at the LSE’s European Institute and Middle East Centre and works actively with youth organisations throughout the U.K. and is interested in issues facing young people today.
    Hiba Latreche is a Law graduate from the University of Strasbourg, France. Whilst pursuing her studies, she has been serving as the General Secretary of the Forum of European Muslim Youth and Student Organisations (FEMYSO), which works towards representing, empowering and developing youth to build a more diverse, cohesive and vibrant Europe. She previously served as the Head of Anti-Discrimination department of EtudiantsMusulmans de France (EMF) and is active within her community, volunteering on issues of civil rights, humanitarian aid and combatting sexism and racism.
    Magid Magid (@MagicMagid) is a Somali-British activist, writer and a former elected politician. He was a Green Party MEP representing Yorkshire & the Humber at the European Parliament and was previously the youngest ever Lord Mayor of Sheffield.
    Emilia Zenzile Roig (@EmiliaZenzile) is the Founder and Executive Director of the Center for Intersectional Justice (CIJ), a Berlin-based organisation combatting inequality and discrimination in Europe. She is faculty member of the Social Justice Study Abroad Program of DePaul University of Chicago and has taught graduate and post-graduate courses on Intersectionality Theory, Postcolonial Studies, Critical Race Theory and International and European Law at prominent European universities. She holds a PhD in political science, a Master of Public Policy and an MBA from the Humboldt University of Berlin, the Hertie School of Governance and Jean Moulin University of Lyon.
    Jennifer Jackson-Preece is an Associate Professor in Nationalism, with a joint appointment in both LSE's European Institute and the Department of International Relations
    The European Institute (@LSEEI) is a centre for research and graduate teaching on the processes of integration and fragmentation within Europe. In the most recent national Research Excellence Framework the Institute was ranked first for research in its sector.
    The 89 Initiative (@89initiative) is a European think-do tank. Through cutting-edge research, the Initiative seeks to help solve Europe’s biggest generational challenges and nudge policy-makers and society forward.
    This event is part of the ‘LSE European Institute Series: Beyond Eurocentrism’. Understanding Europe requires going beyond Eur

    • 1h 34 min

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