124 episodes

Software engineers, architects and team leads have found inspiration to drive change and innovation in their team by listening to the weekly InfoQ Podcast. They have received essential information that helped them validate their software development map. We have achieved that by interviewing some of the top CTOs, engineers and technology directors from companies like Uber, Netflix and more. Over 1,200,000 downloads in the last 3 years.

The InfoQ Podcast InfoQ

    • Technology

Software engineers, architects and team leads have found inspiration to drive change and innovation in their team by listening to the weekly InfoQ Podcast. They have received essential information that helped them validate their software development map. We have achieved that by interviewing some of the top CTOs, engineers and technology directors from companies like Uber, Netflix and more. Over 1,200,000 downloads in the last 3 years.

    Joe Duffy on Infrastructure as Code, Pulumi, and Multi-Cloud

    Joe Duffy on Infrastructure as Code, Pulumi, and Multi-Cloud

    In this podcast, Daniel Bryant sat down with Joe Duffy, founder and CEO at Pulumi, and discussed several infrastructure-themed topics: the evolution of infrastructure as code (IaC), the way in which the open source Pulumi framework allows engineers to write IaC using general purpose programming languages such as JavaScript and Go, and the future of multi-cloud environments.

    Why listen to this podcast:
    ● Infrastructure as Code (IaC) enables engineers to programmatically define the configuration and provisioning of computing infrastructure, on-premises hardware, and cloud services.
    ● Traditional IaC tools were often imperative, requiring engineers to define and enumerate the necessary steps and SDK calls in order to configure the underlying infrastructure.
    ● Modern IaC tools like HashiCorp’s Terraform, AWS CloudFormation and other related cloud vendor tooling enable engineers to write declarative code to define a required state of the infrastructure. The tools parse the declarative configuration and take appropriate action to enact the specified state, for example, calling SDKs and APIs, verifying results, iterating etc.
    ● Pulumi is an open source framework that enables engineers to define IaC using general purpose programming languages, such as Node, Python, .NET Core, and Go.
    ● Pulumi allows imperative specification of IaC. Engineers can use their favourite language-specific features, idioms, and patterns. The use of language modules, packages, and libraries can also enable code reuse.
    ● Under the hood, Pulumi transforms code written in the supported languages to a declarative specification model. This model is then used to enact the required infrastructure state.
    ● Frameworks like Pulumi enable engineers to deploy and configure infrastructure across multiple cloud vendors and services (including Kubernetes clusters).

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    • 27 min
    Dylan Schiemann on the Evolution of Dojo, Web Components and Trends in the Web Development Landscape

    Dylan Schiemann on the Evolution of Dojo, Web Components and Trends in the Web Development Landscape

    In this podcast Charles Humble spoke to Dylan Schiemann, co-creator of Dojo and InfoQ’s JavaScript and Web Development lead editor, about the history and current state of Dojo, and key emerging trends in the JavaScript landscape today. Key topics include Dojo’s adoption of Typescript, web components, and client-side libraries such as Svelte and Stencil.

    Why listen to this podcast:

    - Modern Dojo (2.0 and upwards) is focussed on being a very small, opinionated reactive framework, but with a lot of the components you need to build a modern JavaScript application built in.
    - The framework tries to align closely to standards, for example using Web Components extensively for UI components, alongside ES modules and promises. The use of standards, as well as the convergence towards the reactive programming model for web UI, has improved interoperability, though there are some limitations such as the lack of an easy way to share resources across web components.
    - Dojo was one of the first frameworks to make the decision to switch to Typescript, though it took some time to make that transition. The switch was mainly motivated by TypeScript’s support for interfaces, but it wasn’t until Typescript 2.6 they felt able to ship Dojo 2.
    - On the client side we’re paying close attention to Svelte and Stencil as two particularly interesting client-side frameworks.
    - We’ve moved Web Components from early adopter to early majority on the trend report, based on the fact that all browsers accept IE now natively support it, but also large companies such as Apple, Nike and ESPN are deploying web components and their sites. Apple’s iTunes implementation, for example, now uses web components.

    More on this: Quick scan our curated show notes on InfoQ https://bit.ly/2Qy75Jr
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    • 32 min
    Gareth Rushgrove on Kubernetes as a Platform, Applications, and Security

    Gareth Rushgrove on Kubernetes as a Platform, Applications, and Security

    In this podcast, Daniel Bryant sat down with Gareth Rushgrove, Director of Product Management at Snyk. Topics covered included Kubernetes as a platform, application abstractions, continuous delivery, and implementing good security practices in the cloud native space.

    Why listen to this podcast:

    - The value provided by Kubernetes depends on an organisation’s context. Kubernetes acts as both a series of lower-level building blocks for a platform, and also as a very powerful API for deploying and operating container-based applications.
    - Kubernetes provides several useful abstractions for engineers. For example, Pods, Deployments, and Services. However, Kubernetes doesn’t have an “application”-focused abstraction. Tools such as Helm and specifications like the Cloud Native Application Bundle (CNAB) are driving innovation in this space.
    - There is a large amount of open source Kubernetes tooling. This has been created by a range of vendors, groups, and individuals. Encouraging this diverse mix of participation is beneficial for the long-term health of the ecosystem.
    - The Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) provides a space for people to collaborate regardless of their current organisational affiliations.
    - Defining appropriate standards within the cloud native space is useful for enabling interoperability and providing common foundations for others to innovate on top of.
    - Security challenges within IT are socio-technical. Security teams working with cloud native technologies will benefit from continual learning, developing new skills, and researching new tools. For example, the defaults of Kubernetes aren’t necessarily secure, but this can be readily addressed with appropriate configuration.

    More on this: Quick scan our curated show notes on InfoQ https://bit.ly/38PLPFb
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    • 30 min
    Luca Mezzalira on Micro Frontends at DAZN

    Luca Mezzalira on Micro Frontends at DAZN

    - A Micro frontends is an approach to developing frontends that attempts to take some of the same benefits from Microservices and apply them to frontend development.
    - Microfront ends can be developed with different technologies and ownership of components on a single view. However, DAZN took a vertical approach to build them. Each Micro frontend is loaded into an app shell that offers an API for crosscutting concerns. Only one Micro frontend is loaded at a time into the app shell.
    - The ‘Inverse Conway Maneuver’ recommends evolving your team and organizational structure to create the architecture you want.
    - DAZN derisks deployments by using canaries implemented with Lambda at the Edge on Cloudfront. For code deployments, each of the Micro frontends can be introduced with a limited scope and then expanded once proven stable.

    More on this: Quick scan our curated show notes on InfoQ https://bit.ly/38BQAC0
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    • 34 min
    Zhamak Dehghani on Data Mesh, Domain-Oriented Data, and Building Data Platforms

    Zhamak Dehghani on Data Mesh, Domain-Oriented Data, and Building Data Platforms

    In this podcast, Daniel Bryant sat down with Zhamak Dehghani, principal consultant, member of technical advisory board, and portfolio director at ThoughtWorks. Topics discussed included: the motivations for becoming a data-driven organization; the challenges of adapting legacy data platforms and ETL jobs; and how to design and build the next generation of data platforms using ideas from domain-driven design and product thinking, and modern platform principles such as self-service workflows.

    Why listen to this podcast:

    - Becoming a data-driven organization remains one of the top strategic goals of many organizations. Being able to rapidly run experiments and efficiently analyse the resulting data can provide a competitive advantage.
    - There are several “architecture failure modes” within existing enterprise data platforms. They are centralized and monolithic. The composition of data pipelines are often highly-coupled, meaning that a change to the data format will require a cascade of changes throughout the pipeline. And finally, the ownership of data platforms is often siloed and hyper-specialized.
    - The next generation of enterprise data platform architecture requires a paradigm shift towards ubiquitous data with a distributed data mesh.
    Instead of flowing the data from domains into a centrally owned data lake or platform, domains need to host and serve their domain datasets in an easily consumable way.
    - Domain data teams must apply product thinking to the datasets that they provide; considering their data assets as their products, and the rest of the organization's data scientists, ML and data engineers as their customers.
    The key to building the data infrastructure as a platform is (a) to not include any domain specific concepts or business logic, keeping it domain agnostic, and (b) make sure the platform hides all the underlying complexity and provides the data infrastructure components in a self-service manner.


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    • 33 min
    Brittany Postnikoff on Security, Privacy, and Social Engineering with Robots

    Brittany Postnikoff on Security, Privacy, and Social Engineering with Robots

    In this podcast, Daniel Bryant sat down with Brittany Postnikoff, a computer systems analyst specialising on the topics of robotics, embedded systems, and human-robot interaction. Topics discussed included: the rise of robotics and human-robot interaction within modern life, the security and privacy risks of robots used within this context, and the potential for robots to be used to socially engineer people.

    Why listen to this podcast:

    - Physical robots are becoming increasingly common in everyday life, for example, offering directions in airports, cleaning the floor in peoples’ homes, and acting as toys for children.
    - People often imbue these robots with human qualities, and they trust the authority granted to a robot.
    - Social engineering can involve the psychological manipulation of people into performing actions or divulging confidential information. This can be stereotyped by the traditional “con”.
    - As people are interacting with robots in a more human-like way, this can mean that robots can be used for social engineering.
    - A key takeaway for creators of robots and the associated software is the need to develop a deeper awareness of security and privacy issues.
    - Software included within robots should be patched to the latest version, and any data that is being stored or transmitted should be encrypted.
    - Creators should also take care when thinking about the human-robot UX, and explore the potential for unintended consequences if the robot is co-opted into doing bad things.

    More on this: Quick scan our curated show notes on InfoQ https://bit.ly/2v5QTav
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    • 22 min

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