231 episodes

"Speaking of Psychology" is an audio podcast series highlighting some of the latest, most important and relevant psychological research being conducted today. Produced by the American Psychological Association, these podcasts will help listeners apply the science of psychology to their everyday lives.

Speaking of Psychology American Psychological Association

    • Science
    • 5.0 • 3 Ratings

"Speaking of Psychology" is an audio podcast series highlighting some of the latest, most important and relevant psychological research being conducted today. Produced by the American Psychological Association, these podcasts will help listeners apply the science of psychology to their everyday lives.

    Can you be addicted to food? With Ashley Gearhardt, PhD

    Can you be addicted to food? With Ashley Gearhardt, PhD

    We live in a nation awash with cheap, easy-to-get calories, mostly from highly processed convenience foods. Now, some researchers argue that these foods may actually be addictive – just like cigarettes or alcohol. Ashley Gearhardt, PhD, of the University of Michigan, talks about why highly processed foods may trigger addiction, the difference between addiction and simply liking to indulge in treats, who is most at risk for food addiction, and more.


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    Ashley Gearhardt, PhD
    Speaking of Psychology Home Page

    • 37 min
    Encore - How to overcome feeling like an imposter, with Lisa Orbé-Austin, PhD, and Kevin Cokley, PhD

    Encore - How to overcome feeling like an imposter, with Lisa Orbé-Austin, PhD, and Kevin Cokley, PhD

    Do you ever feel like a phony? Like you’re not really qualified for the job you’re doing, despite your achievements? Those are signs of the impostor phenomenon, also called impostor syndrome. Dr. Lisa Orbé-Austin, a counseling psychologist and career coach in New York City, and Dr. Kevin Cokley, a University of Texas at Austin psychology professor who studies the impostor phenomenon among ethnic minority students, discuss where impostor feelings come from, the repercussions they can have in people’s lives, and what you can do to address imposter feelings.

    • 34 min
    Encore - Tasty words, colorful sounds - How people with synesthesia experience the world, with Julia Simner, PhD

    Encore - Tasty words, colorful sounds - How people with synesthesia experience the world, with Julia Simner, PhD

    More than 4% of people have some form of synesthesia, a neurological condition that causes senses to link and merge. People with synesthesia may taste words, hear colors, or see calendar dates arrayed in physical space. Dr. Julia Simner, a professor of neuropsychology at the University of Sussex in the U.K., discusses the many forms of synesthesia, how synesthetes experience the world, and what scientists have learned from brain imaging studies about synesthesia. She also discusses her research on other sensory differences such as misophonia, an extreme aversion to specific sounds.

    • 38 min
    What is borderline personality disorder? With Carla Sharp, PhD

    What is borderline personality disorder? With Carla Sharp, PhD

    Borderline personality disorder is one of the most frequently diagnosed personality disorders, and one of the most misunderstood. Carla Sharp, PhD, of the University of Houston, discusses how BPD is diagnosed, defined and treated, how family members can help children and adults with BPD, and how the disorder fits in with researchers’ evolving understanding of personality disorders in general.
     
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    Carla Sharp, PhD
     
    Speaking of Psychology Home Page

    • 34 min
    The truth about why kids lie, with Victoria Talwar, PhD

    The truth about why kids lie, with Victoria Talwar, PhD

    Most parents want to raise their children to be honest adults, so the first time that they catch their child in a lie it may come as an unpleasant surprise. But psychologists’ research has found that lying is a normal part of childhood. In fact, it’s a developmental milestone. Victoria Talwar, PhD, of McGill University, talks about why kids lie, how lying is tied to cognitive development, how children understand the morality of lying (including the “gray areas” of keeping secrets and tattling), and how parents can encourage truth-telling and honesty in their children. 
     
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    Victoria Talwar, PhD
     
    Speaking of Psychology Home Page

    • 40 min
    Can we unlearn implicit biases? With Mahzarin Banaji, PhD

    Can we unlearn implicit biases? With Mahzarin Banaji, PhD

    The idea that people have biases that operate below the level of conscious thought is uncomfortable. But decades of research have found that many people who would never consciously agree with prejudiced statements against Black people, LGBTQ people or women can nonetheless harbor implicit biases toward these groups and others. Mahzarin Banaji, PhD, one of the pioneers of implicit bias research, talks about where implicit biases come from, the difference between implicit bias and prejudice, and which biases have lessened – and which have not – in recent years.
     
     
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    Mahzarin Banaji, PhD
     
     
    Speaking of Psychology Home Page
     

    • 51 min

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