23 episodios

ArchiTreats: Food for Thought celebrates the Year of Alabama History through a series of sequential lectures in Alabama history by leading experts in the field. These ArchiTreats presentations are made possible by the Friends of the Alabama Archives and a grant from the Alabama Humanities Foundation, a state program of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

ArchiTreats Alabama Learning Exchange (ALEX)

    • Historia

ArchiTreats: Food for Thought celebrates the Year of Alabama History through a series of sequential lectures in Alabama history by leading experts in the field. These ArchiTreats presentations are made possible by the Friends of the Alabama Archives and a grant from the Alabama Humanities Foundation, a state program of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

    • video
    The Civil War in Alabama

    The Civil War in Alabama

    ArchiTreats: Food for Thought celebrates the Year of Alabama History through a series of sequential lectures in Alabama history by leading experts in the field. Enjoy this installment that was presented on Thursday, May 21 with Robert B. Bradley presenting The Civil War in Alabama.

    The Civil War in Alabama focuses upon the events and activities which took place within the state from secession until the final days of the war. According to Bradley, many of the most significant events which took place in Alabama are frequently treated as local history when, in fact, they were part of a much larger picture. The formation of the Confederate government, the decision to fire on Ft. Sumter, the occupation of north Alabama, Streight's raid, Rousseau's raid, the Selma manufacturing complex, and the campaign for Mobile are just a few of the topics examined in this program.

    Robert (Bob) Bradley is currently the Chief Curator at the Alabama Department of Archives and History. From 1974-1986, he was a historian with the National Park Service, specializing in the management, preservation, and interpretation of 18th- to mid 20th-century fortifications and military sites. Of his several assignments, his position as Chief Historian at Fort Sumter National Monument in Charleston, South Carolina was his favorite. From 1986-1988 Bradley was Historic Sites Administrator for the Alabama Historical Commission. Since coming to the Archives in 1988 he has been responsible for the preservation, documentation, and conservation of the Department's collection of nearly a half-million artifacts. He is the author of Documenting the Civil War Period Flag Collection at the Alabama Department of Archives and History, which is available on the Department's web-site, and he has contributed to a wide variety of Civil War publications. He is also very active in Civil War battlefield preservation.

    This ArchiTreats presentation is made possible by the Friends of the Alabama Archives and a grant from the Alabama Humanities Foundation, a state program of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

    • 49 min
    • video
    The Creek Indians in Alabama

    The Creek Indians in Alabama

    ArchiTreats: Food for Thought celebrates the Year of Alabama History through a series of sequential lectures in Alabama history by leading experts in the field. Join us for the third presentation in the series as Kathryn Braund presents The Creek Indians in Alabama.

    Once the newly established state of Alabama extended sovereignty over the tribe, it effectively ended the existence of the Creek Nation in their traditional homeland. In her talk, Dr. Braund will explore the main themes in Creek Indian history, including trade and land, diversity and division, and change and continuity. Drawing on both the written record and historical artifacts, Dr. Braund will explore the complex story of Alabama when it was owned and ruled by the Creek Indians.

    Dr. Kathryn Braund is Professor of History at Auburn University and has authored or edited four books relating to the southeastern Indians. Her first book, Deerskins and Duffels: The Creek Indian Trade with Anglo-America, 1685–1815, was the first to extensively examine the Creek deerskin trade, especially the impact of commercial hunting on all aspects of Indian society. She has also written on William Bartram, an eighteenth-century botanist whose published account of his southern Travels is an American literary classic, and on James Adair, a deerskin trader whose account of his life among the southeastern Indians was published in London in 1775. Dr. Braund has also published scholarly articles on the southeastern Indians during the American Revolution, Creek gender and work roles, and race relations and slavery among the Indians. She also has contributed to several encyclopedias and reference works. Currently, she is researching the Creek War of 1813-1814.

    This ArchiTreats presentation is made possible by the Friends of the Alabama Archives and a grant from the Alabama Humanities Foundation, a state program of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

    • 53 min
    • video
    Alabama's Civil War: Researching and Writing "Selma: A Novel of the Civil War"

    Alabama's Civil War: Researching and Writing "Selma: A Novel of the Civil War"

    In Val L. McGee's new book, Selma: A Novel of the Civil War, hope is born of tragedy. Join us as McGee presents, "Alabama's Civil War: Researching and Writing Selma: A Novel of the Civil War." This ‘Bonus' ArchiTreats: Food for Thought presentation was held at the Alabama Department of Archives and History.

    The drama in Selma: A Novel of the Civil War is taken primarily from the pages of Alabama newspapers published in the early 1860s, available only through the reference room of the Alabama Archives. Selma also reflects research in more than 250 slave cases decided by the Alabama Supreme Court from 1819 to 1865 as published in the state Supreme Court's Alabama Reports. In this presentation McGee will share the historical research which informs almost every page of this novel and he will discuss the process of writing a historical novel.

    Reviewer Dr. Norwood Kerr noted that, "Selma is especially vivid in describing the pre-war ‘Queen City of the Black Belt.'... Moderate unionists, fire-eating secessionists, and free and enslaved blacks - Judge McGee gives voice to all with both precision and compassion."

    Val McGee is a past president of the Alabama Historical Association and the Friends of the Alabama Archives He is the author of Claybank Memories: A History of Dale County, Alabama; The Origins of Fort Rucker; and A Cross Above: A History of the First United Methodist Church of Ozark, Alabama. He served as an infantry officer at Camp Rucker and in Europe during World War II. An attorney by profession, he was an Alabama trial judge from 1981 to 1993. Selma is his first novel.

    This ‘Bonus' ArchiTreats is presented by the Alabama Department of Archives and History.

    • 54 min
    • video
    The Robert Trent Jones Golf Trail

    The Robert Trent Jones Golf Trail

    Mountains, rivers, and beaches challenge golfers who play Alabama's extensive trail of championship golf courses designed by eminent American golf course architect Robert Trent Jones, Sr. Join us as James R. Hansen presents “The Robert Trent Jones Golf Trail.” This ArchiTreats: Food for Thought presentation was held at the Alabama Department of Archives and History.

    Hansen will use a handsomely illustrated slide presentation to examine the major architectural design principles built into the Trail. This array of courses built since the late 1980s at 11 sites across the state are part of a massive financial investment and economic development project sponsored by the Retirement Systems of Alabama. Hansen will discuss the Trail courses as reflections of Jones' personal philosophy, and review the extraordinary golf courses that are as demanding as they are picturesque.

    Hansen is Professor of History and director of the Honors College at Auburn University. An expert in aerospace history for the past 26 years, he has written books and articles about the history of science and technology. His most recent book, First Man (Simon & Schuster, 2005), the first and only authorized biography of Neil Armstrong, first man on the moon, has won numerous awards. Although most of his scholarly work has dealt with aerospace history, Hansen has also made his mark on the field of golf course history. He is currently working on the authorized biography of Robert Trent Jones, as well as a book on golf in Alabama.

    This ArchiTreats presentation is one in a series of monthly third-Thursday free lectures presented by the Alabama Department of Archives and History. The public is invited to bring a sack lunch and enjoy a bit of Alabama history. Coffee and tea will be provided by the Friends of the Alabama Archives. For more information call (334) 353-4712 or go to www.archives.alabama.gov.

    • 48 min
    • video
    The Cotton State

    The Cotton State

    ArchiTreats: Food for Thought celebrates the Year of Alabama History through a series of sequential lectures in Alabama history by leading experts in the field.

    While many think of antebellum Alabama as a state of magnolias and cotton plantations, that picture tells only part of the story. This program will show how three groups – white yeomen farmers, planter elites, and enslaved African Americans – together created the “cotton state” in Alabama. It will begin with a description of the differences between life in the yeoman sections of the state – the hill counties and the Wiregrass – and life in the plantation areas – the Black Belt and the Tennessee Valley. Each of these groups contributed to and shaped Alabama society and antebellum politics. The program will examine some of the “hot” political topics of the time – the state bank, congressional districting, taxation, state aid for railroads, and secession from the Union.

    Montgomery - native J. Mills Thornton is a professor of history at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. Professor Thornton received his bachelor’s degree with high honors from Princeton University in 1966, and his doctorate from Yale University in 1974, joining the faculty of the University of Michigan in that year. His book, Politics and Power in a Slave Society: Alabama, 1800-1860, published in 1978, received the Dunning Prize of the American Historical Association. His second book, Dividing Lines: Municipal Politics and the Struggle for Civil Rights in Montgomery, Birmingham and Selma, published in 2002, received the Liberty Legacy Prize of the Organization of American Historians. During 2007-08, he served as the Pitt Professor of American History and Institutions at the University of Cambridge in England.

    This ArchiTreats presentation is made possible by the Friends of the Alabama Archives and a grant from the Alabama Humanities Foundation, a state program of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

    • 53 min
    • video
    The First Alabamians

    The First Alabamians

    ArchiTreats: Food for Thought will celebrate the Year of Alabama History through a series of sequential lectures in Alabama history by leading experts in the field. Join us for the second presentation in the series at noon on Thursday, February 19 as Craig Sheldon presents The First Alabamians. This presentation will be held at the Alabama Department of Archives and History. For the past 12,000 years, the land now known as Alabama has been occupied by a series of Indian cultures. Beginning in the Pliestocene, or Late Ice Age, these groups evolved from small hunting and gathering societies in numerous small tribes to powerful agricultural chiefdoms supporting the mostly highly developed American Indian cultures north of Mexico. Severely devastated by early 16th century Spanish expeditions, Indian cultures reconstructed themselves to become the historic Creek, Choctaw, Chickasaw, and Cherokee Indians. This presentation briefly outlines the six major archaeological periods of Alabama prehistory and early history with emphasis upon some of the pivotal cultural innovations such as pottery, architecture, trade, agriculture, and ceremonialism.

    Born in Fairhope, Alabama, Craig Sheldon was educated at the University of Alabama and the University of Oregon where he received a Ph.D. in Anthropology. His fields of interest include archaeology, ethnohistory and architecture of the southeastern United States and Mesoamerica, and subsistence technology. He has concentrated upon the culture, history, archaeology, and architecture of the historic Creeks of Alabama and Georgia. He has presented over 30 papers and written over 20 articles, reports, and books. He is a member of the Alabama Historical Commission and the Council for Alabama Archaeology.

    This ArchiTreats presentation is made possible by the Friends of the Alabama Archives and a grant from the Alabama Humanities Foundation, a state program of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

    • 40 min

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