15 episodios

Audible Café explores the natural world, wildlife, sustainable living, and that thing called climate change. We meet fascinating people who are embracing new ways of treading more lightly on the earth. We champion other species and seek to meet them where they are in all their wild and wooly glory.

Audible Cafe Radio Show and Podcast Judy Eddy

    • Cultura y sociedad

Audible Café explores the natural world, wildlife, sustainable living, and that thing called climate change. We meet fascinating people who are embracing new ways of treading more lightly on the earth. We champion other species and seek to meet them where they are in all their wild and wooly glory.

    Four Kings Day presented by Manos Unidas

    Four Kings Day presented by Manos Unidas

    Today’s show about the "I Have A Dream” / “Yo Tengo Un Sueño” Four Kings Community Event on Saturday, February 28, 2020 from 5-8 pm at the Whitney Museum of Art, 42 Wendell Ave, Pittsfield MA. It is co-hosted by Manos Unidas and the Roots and Dreams Coop and other dedicated collaborators.

    • 33 min
    Episode 13: Alice Arena of FRRACS

    Episode 13: Alice Arena of FRRACS

    Today I air my interview with Alice Arena, Executive Director of the Fore River Residents Against the Compressor Station, or FRRACS. Alice shares the history and urgent updates on the Weymouth Compressor Station project.

    • 1h 5 min
    Episode 12: Special Edition - "Under Pressure" Documentary Screening Event.

    Episode 12: Special Edition - "Under Pressure" Documentary Screening Event.

    Today, I speak with Rosemary Wessel of No Fracked Gas in Mass, Logan Malik of BEAT and No Fracked Gas in Mass, and Dr. Curt Nordgaard, a pediatrician, about the documentary Under Pressure and the Merrimack Valley fracked gas disaster of 2019.

    • 48 min
    Episode 11: Charley Eiseman, Freelance Naturalist and Bug Tracker Extraordinaire

    Episode 11: Charley Eiseman, Freelance Naturalist and Bug Tracker Extraordinaire

    Today's episode features freelance naturalist, photographer, and intrepid Bug Tracker, Charley Eiseman. Charley has written two books and documents his fascinating explorations on his blog, BugTracks.

    • 1h 23 min
    Episode 10: Steve Sears of The Stationery Factory in Dalton, Mass 

    Episode 10: Steve Sears of The Stationery Factory in Dalton, Mass 

    In today’s episode, I am airing my interview with Steve Sears of Dalton, Mass. Steve Sears is a true Renaissance Man of the 21st Century. He’s a wildlife advocate and on the Board of MassWildlife. He’s a family man, musician, small family “homesteader,” and he has led the acquisition and transformation of The Stationery Factory in Dalton, Mass from an empty former Crane & Company factory into a thriving marketplace, maker-space, and community center.

    • 53 min
    Episode 9: Jeff Ruch of PEER (Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility) (Part 2 of 2)

    Episode 9: Jeff Ruch of PEER (Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility) (Part 2 of 2)

    Thank you for listening to the Audible Café podcast.
    With our public employees enduring the fifth week of their forced furlough during a government shutdown resulting from the actions of a despotic and vindictive President Trump, this interview — and my interview with Kyla Bennett from PEER last week — couldn’t be more timely.
    In today’s episode, I am sharing my interview with Jeff Ruch, Executive Director of PEER - Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility. PEER is a watchdog of our public environmental agencies, and works extensively to empower public employees so that they are literally peers within their agencies, with a seat at the table that respects and relies on their knowledge and expertise to set and enforce policy, and honors their years of service and dedication. This honoring of our nation’s environmental laws and policies and employees is sorely missing, to say the least, under the Trump administration. Which means that PEER has been receiving many, many calls from deeply concerned and disenfranchised public employees.
    Jeff has been the Executive Director of PEER since 1997. He helped to start PEER and for the first four years served as General Counsel & Program Director for the organization. Prior to founding PEER, Jeff was the Policy Director and a staff attorney at the Government Accountability Project, representing whistleblowers from both the public and private sector. Before coming to DC, Jeff worked in California state government for 17 years, mostly in the State Legislature as counsel to various committees where he drafted literally hundreds of laws on topics ranging from energy conservation to the rights of employed inventors.
    We’re grateful to Jeff for taking the time to talk with us. And we’re especially grateful to him for his years of devotion to the people who serve our country as public employees in environmental agencies. Protecting the protectors - it is not an easy job. But these public servants do not deserve to be disrespected, harassed, and harmed by abusive government practices. And neither do the great diversity of species who live all across our nation — whether in public parks or on other lands — who literally depend on our environmental agencies for their lives.
    So please, after you listen to the show, visit PEER’s website, learn about the campaigns they are working on, and support them. Our public agencies are responsible for ensuring that the lands and waters and living beings in their care are protected and allowed to flourish. Public employees hold the future of our nation in their hands. Let’s not let dictatorial, corporate-funded politicians keep them from doing their jobs!
    Thank you for listening.
    As always, you can learn more and access archives and show notes with lots of resources at audiblecafe.com, or visit the FB page - just search for Audible Café, or follow us on Twitter @audiblecafe. If you listen on iTunes, please subscribe, and leave us a review. It’s helps a lot. We appreciate your feedback. So if you’d like to get directly in touch with us, email listenup@audiblecafe.com.
    Note: During this interview, Jeff Ruch describes the censorship and bureaucratic and legal punishment of a government scientist, Dr. Charles Monnett, who was one of the first to report polar bear mortality as a result of drowning — a deeply sad result of melting ice flows due to climate change. The images associated with this phenomenon are terribly disturbing and yet have served to bring the shocking truth of climate change before the public eye in a way climate change reports cannot. At one point in our discussion, the deceased polar bears are referred to as “floaters,” not in any negative way at all. I considered editing that descriptor out of the interview because it upset me, but then stopped myself. The importance of the scientist’s work— a

    • 56 min

Top podcasts de Cultura y sociedad