71 episodios

What can sport teach us about life and how best to live it? Each week Simon Mundie sits down with an expert and uses sport to answer life’s big questions.

Don’t Tell Me The Score BBC

    • Deportes

What can sport teach us about life and how best to live it? Each week Simon Mundie sits down with an expert and uses sport to answer life’s big questions.

    No regrets: Alex Danson

    No regrets: Alex Danson

    Giving your everything and having no regrets with Olympic gold medallist Alex Danson. Alex is one of Britain’s greatest ever hockey players, who suffered a traumatic brain injury in 2018. Alex has been capped over 300 times and was an instrumental part of the team that won Olympic gold in Rio in 2016. We talk about some of the lessons she learnt in becoming the best in the world, including understanding that character is more important than talent if you’re going to make it. Alex suffered a traumatic brain injury in the most innocuous of circumstances, while on holiday with her husband. It left her languishing in a dark room for weeks on end, unable to cope with light, touch or noise. At one point she lost the ability to talk. She has now recovered enough to rejoin her teammates, but admits she’s a different person now to who she was before the accident. Alex explains how the most difficult aspect of her injury was the loss of identity and purpose that she suffered. She has now come to see what happened as a gift, that’s enabled her to have more balance in her life, and value what is truly important: her health and the relationships she has with those people important to her. Alex has become more open and vulnerable, has stopped overthinking and worrying about what others think and slowed down and become more present. She is hyper aware that life can change in an instant, and even if she isn’t able to make it back into the team in time for Tokyo 2020, she will have no regrets because she gave everything to follow her dream when she could.

    • 1h 1m
    Respect: Carl Frampton

    Respect: Carl Frampton

    Treating people as you want to be treated with boxing legend Carl Frampton, Northern Ireland’s first two weight World Champion. Carl is one of the most down to earth boxers on the planet. He's also one of the most popular, with his fans willing to travel all over the world to watch their man in action. The theme of this chat chat is 'respect'. Carl grew up in Belfast, in the loyalist area of Tigers Bay. The next housing estate across was the New Lodge which was Republican. As a child, he witnessed tension and traumatising scenes. Carl is a very humble and level headed guy, and he takes pride in uniting people, wherever they're from, and whatever they believe. He's always been one to people at face value, but getting into boxing when he was young helped reinforce that side of his character. In this episode, Carl explains why having a focus is so important, and why sport in particular can help people integrate. He talks about getting your priorities right, not showing off and why it's worth expecting the unexpected.

    • 1h 2 min
    Obsession: Ric Flair

    Obsession: Ric Flair

    The good and bad of letting your profession consume your life with WWE legend Ric Flair.
    Ric is rated as the greatest wrestler of all time by many, including legends like Hulk Hogan, Shawn Michaels and Stone Cold Steve Austin. He had a career spanning 40 years, was a 16-time world champion AND was the first two time WWE hall of fame inductee. His most memorable catchphrase was just one word- WOO- and it became so famous they named a wrestling tour after it. His appearance was so flashy, Snoop Dogg said Ric Flair was bling before bling was bling. Wrestling essentially consumed Ric’s life, and he admits that caused some difficulties in his life. Ric was a fitness fanatic, but he also drank every day to excess. He survived a serious plane crash early in his career, but that led the creation of his Nature Boy alter ego. In 2013 his son Reid, a promising wrestler himself, died from a drugs overdose. And in 2017, Ric was thought to be near death after surgery for multiple organ issues, but he’s a survivor and has made a stunning recovery. In this episode Ric shares some of the stories from his unbelievable life, including talking for the first time about the final conversation he had with his son Reid before he tragically died. He talks about his daughter Charlotte Flair, now a top WWE wrestler herself, and how he helped hone her competitive spirit. And he shares lessons about hard work, about believing in yourself and forgetting false modesty, and not making some of the mistakes he did.

    • 50 min
    Facing Fear: Gareth Thomas

    Facing Fear: Gareth Thomas

    Why facing and overcoming fear forces you to grow as a person, with Gareth Thomas.

    Gareth is one of Wales’ greatest ever rugby players. He's their second highest try scorer ever, and was the first man to reach 100 Wales caps. He’s also the first high profile player to come out as gay. Recently he came out as HIV positive, doing a huge amount to tackle the stigma around it in the process. Gareth competed in an Ironman when he came out, and the support 'Alfie' got as he competed shows how much love and respect there is for him. Gareth has faced down fear throughout his life, and the key lesson he’s learned is that life isn’t about simply seeking to be comfortable. It’s about thriving on challenges and overcoming them, because that’s how you grow as a person and are able to lift other people up in the process. In this episode Simon talks to Gareth about the values instilled in him by his parents Barry and Yvonne. They talk about how more big names in the world of sport could use their platform for good, as their power is immense. Gareth explains how being dishonest causes you to live in fear, and how shame can make you aggressive towards other people and the world at large. They discuss the power of forgiveness, and why Gareth refuses to be a victim, despite suffering a homophobic attack and being blackmailed about his HIV status. They talk about the power of vulnerability and how it is a strength not a weakness, and why being in touch with your emotions is often a sign of that inner strength. And they address the issue of homophobia in football, and why Gareth thinks the Football (Offences) Act needs changing to include homophobic chanting.

    • 1h 12 min
    Self-development: Ebony Rainford-Brent

    Self-development: Ebony Rainford-Brent

    Why continually working on yourself is worth it, and how to do it, with Ebony Rainford-Brent. Ebony is a former England cricketer who won both the World Cup and the Ashes during her career. She was also the first black woman to play for England. Since retiring, she’s joined the Test Match Special team, becoming a part of one of sport’s great broadcasting institutions. She’s also a motivational speaker, a podcaster and was appointed Surrey’s first director of women’s cricket. The theme of this chat is 'self-development'. Ebony suffered a huge personal tragedy when she was just five, her oldest brother died after being a victim of knife crime. They discuss how that impacted her and her family, and some of the reasons why knife crime is such a big issue, and what could be done to help reduce it. Ebony grew up without much material wealth, but her early experiences helped her develop resilience, and a willingness to take risks. She discovered a passion for cricket aged 10, despite having written it off as a boring sport before having even tried it, so they discuss the importance of trying things and capitalising on opportunities. Aged 19, she suffered a pretty catastrophic back injury which meant she could barely walk and faced never playing sport again. Despite sinking into a deep depression, that experience eventually shaped her future as well as her interest in self-development. Ebony and Simon discuss some powerful techniques for being able to perform on command and the importance of habits, they talk about embracing your dark side, and accepting yourself rather than trying to fix yourself, and seeing opportunity in situations that others would simply dismiss. They also discuss strategic thinking and embracing JOMO (the joy of missing out) not FOMO (the fear of missing out). Ebony and Simon also discuss a number of books that have impacted their personal quests for self-development.

    • 1h 6 min
    Domination: Stephen Hendry

    Domination: Stephen Hendry

    What does it take to be utterly dominant, with snooker legend Stephen Hendry. In the 1990s, Stephen was the undisputed best snooker player in the world, winning the World Championship a record seven times. His period of domination is up there with any other champion from any other sport. But what does it take to be as dominant as he was? Stephen emphasises the importance of loving what you do, but also putting in the hours of practice, as nothing can replace hard work. He had to learn to embrace a work ethic that at first was torture, training 6 hours a day, 7 days a week. But that level of commitment began to pay off, and once it did it stopped being such a chore, and instead became an important and valuable means to an end. Stephen emphasises the need to be ruthless and have a killer instinct, and how to capitalise when your opponent is showing signs of being affected by pressure. He talks about the importance of putting your best foot forward and giving off an air of confidence, even if you don’t always feel it, and how to get confidence back by going back to basics when it is starting to wane. Stephen changed the game of snooker with the way he played, and we discuss the implications of that. It's about following your intuition and choosing to do things differently from the status quo. Essentially asking why things are done the way they are, and investigating if they could be done differently, a mindset which can be applied in whichever field you work in. Stephen also opens up about how his game fell apart, and why he couldn’t find the answers to get him back on track.

    • 52 min

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