19 episodios

Dynamic Duo podcast! Developmental optometrists Ryan Edwards, OD, FCOVD and Lindsey Stull, OD, FCOVD introduce you to their podcast series. The hope of this series is to offer knowledge and insight into the field of developmental optometry and vision rehabilitation, the importance of functional vision and its impact on other systems of the body, and the benefits of collaboration between professionals to address visual and other sensory impairments. Future podcasts will feature interviews with professionals and individuals who have been affected by or involved in vision rehabilitation to offer listeners a better understanding of this unique area of healthcare.
Comments, suggestions or if there is a guest you would like to hear on the show, let us know by email: dynamicduo@dynamicvisiontherapy.com

Dynamic Duo Podcast Dynamic Center for Vision Therapy

    • Salud y forma física

Dynamic Duo podcast! Developmental optometrists Ryan Edwards, OD, FCOVD and Lindsey Stull, OD, FCOVD introduce you to their podcast series. The hope of this series is to offer knowledge and insight into the field of developmental optometry and vision rehabilitation, the importance of functional vision and its impact on other systems of the body, and the benefits of collaboration between professionals to address visual and other sensory impairments. Future podcasts will feature interviews with professionals and individuals who have been affected by or involved in vision rehabilitation to offer listeners a better understanding of this unique area of healthcare.
Comments, suggestions or if there is a guest you would like to hear on the show, let us know by email: dynamicduo@dynamicvisiontherapy.com

    Sara Bush, OD, FAAO

    Sara Bush, OD, FAAO

    Screentime is a popular topic that many optometrists are asked about, including Dr. Ryan and Dr. Lindsey. Dr. Sara Bush is here to answer frequently asked questions about how blue light effects refractive error, attention and learning skills, and ocular health. We welcome her on this month’s Dynamic Duo Podcast!



    Things you will learn in this episode:



     While children get older, specifically school age, it can be difficult to limit screen time. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends using a Family Plan to accommodate, control, and regulate to each individual family. While the percentage of adult myopic patients is currently around 28%, it is projected to affect about 50% of adults. There are not any studies that link screen time to myopia but a few that possibly link working distance to this progression.  Screens are constantly around us and it may be unrealistic to limit ourselves to a number of hours. Instead, learn ways of managing and applying it. Increased screen time was associated with a decrease in executive function and academic performance; some studies show a correlation as early as kindergarten. Passive viewing can have more of a negative impact compared to an interactive, engaging game or show. 



    Family Media Plan



    Screen Time in the Pediatric Population: A Review of Its Effects on Refractive Error, Attention and Learning, and Ocular Health

    • 26 min
    Episode 18: Sue Barry, PhD

    Episode 18: Sue Barry, PhD

    After multiple unsuccessful surgeries, Sue Barry was told she would never be able to see 3D. Fortunately, she stumbled upon developmental optometrists who were able to correct her strabismus. She speaks today about the struggles and accomplishments of her journey that she has also wrote in her book Fixing My Gaze. 



    Things you will learn in this episode:



    Sue Barry was diagnosed with strabismus, more commonly called “cross-eyed”. Her surgeries fixed the cosmetic problems, however she still could only see one eye at a time. Sue’s eyes had contradicting views of space and sent a confusing message to the brain. Therefore, the brain “shut off”, or suppressed, one eye unconsciously.  Many people with strabismus can still see 20/20 vision; however, one eye is still “turning in”. Strabismus patients may have a hard time driving, reading, or riding a bike. Vision therapy is beneficial to everyone “9 months to 90 years”. Everyone has different starting points and different abilities. The Brock string is designed to give instant feedback to know where each of your eyes are pointing. In the words of Sue Barry, it is “as simple as it is elegant, as elegant as it is simple”.There are two parts of vision therapy: seeing in stereo vision and continuing with the exercises until it becomes your default way of seeing. Keeping a journal of your activities, vision goals, frustrations, and overall mood after a therapy session can help you see your progress and what you have accomplished.



    Sue Barry’s Book



    Sue’s Ted Talk



    Sue Barry – Oliver Sacks



    Sue Barry’s Website

    • 39 min
    Episode 17: Cameron McCrodan, OD, FCOVD

    Episode 17: Cameron McCrodan, OD, FCOVD

    Cameron McCrodan gave a Ted Talk about the unknown or often overlooked parts of the visual system. Having over 36,000 views on Youtube, his speech has caught the eye of many adults, parents, students, and professionals, including Dr. Stull and Dr. Edwards. We welcome him on this month’s podcast!



    Things you will learn in this episode:



    Unlike a disease, it is difficult to show people what is happening or understand what the patient can see. This is why it can be overlooked or not treated if the doctor or patient are uneducated on this topic. To a certain extent, people aren’t just “stuck” with their vision; because it is “such a learned process, you can make it more accurate” Although studies can be helpful, it is important to “dig deeper” and fully understand the logistics behind the numbers and conclusion. Approximately “12%-18% may have binocular issues”; however, many go undetected or do not interfere with everyday life.Understanding what a patient wants to get from an exam can help tailor it and connect more with the patient. Going through VT can improve so much more than just vision. Children and adults can see a change in behavior, self esteem, or schoolwork/work.Cameron compares a child with a vision issue like a day at work with your computer down. You are still expected to do the same tasks but it is frustrating and focused your energy away from your responsibilities. 



    References Mentioned:



    Cam McCrodan’s Ted Talk

    • 44 min
    Episode 16: Cathy Stern, OD, FCOVD, FAAO, FCSO

    Episode 16: Cathy Stern, OD, FCOVD, FAAO, FCSO

    After Dr. Edwards and Dr. Stull came across Cathy Stern’s blog post, they invited her to speak about her stand on patching. Cathy talks about her experience with it, the negative effects, and other alternatives to patching. 



    Things you will learn in this episode: 



    Patching is mostly prescribed with patients diagnosed with amblyopia (lazy eye) in hopes to fine tune the vision in the poor eye. It is also commonly prescribed to patients who have a brain injury such as concussion, stroke, or accident to eliminate the double vision. Patching eliminates peripheral information on that side and does allow the eyes to be working together. For cases like amblyopia, it may make school-work harder if the lazy eye is very weak.   In extreme cases, patches have been stitched to the forehead or devices have been put on a patient’s arm so they can not physically take it off. Instead of completely patching and blocking the eye, using techniques that slightly block or lessen the ability of the “good” eye are more effective and appealing. If a patient decides to patch, it is recommended for only two hours and to engage his/her vision by doing eye- hand coordination and have a visual incentive. 



    Sutured Occluder for Amblyopia



    Psychosocial Impacts of Occlusion Therapy



    Elbow Splinting to Increase Patching Compliance



    BLOG: Let’s get rid of the pirate patch



    Archives of Ophthalmology- Patching 2003



    Tetris Study



    https://noravisionrehab.org/



    https://www.covd.org/?











    Comments, suggestions or if there is a guest you would like to hear on the show, let us know by email: dynamicduo@dynamicvisiontherapy.com

    • 24 min
    Episode 15: Nick Davenport – Mind.body.1- Cognitive-Visual Training

    Episode 15: Nick Davenport – Mind.body.1- Cognitive-Visual Training

    Today we speak to Nick Davenport who has lead the way in merging sports psychology with muscle and strength training. Having been unfamiliar territory before, he took a risk and has created Mindbody One and partnered with Fitligths. 



    Things you will learn in this episode:



    Nick’s equipment is focused around working memory and decision making while integrating the physical aspect. By combining both, he is “bridging the gap between stationary cognitive and active physical”. Mindbody One merges multiple different cognitive skills. His products bring in a “one stop shop for all your cognitive needs” and creates a more “real life” situation. In a stressful situation one “reverts back to their level of practice” and it is important to practice in the correct way. It is recommended to do about two to three hours a week but can be broken down however it is convenient for the individual; after three to four weeks, results become evident. Nick emphasizes five different skills: vision, working memory, reaction, stress- exposure, and mindset management. They all have information and examples on his website and instagram when you become a member. 



    References Mentioned:



    MindBody



    https://www.instagram.com/themindbody1/



    Comments, suggestions or if there is a guest you would like to hear on the show, let us know by email: dynamicduo@dynamicvisiontherapy.com

    • 26 min
    Episode 14: Brandon Begotka, OD, FCOVD – “Infant Vision Development”

    Episode 14: Brandon Begotka, OD, FCOVD – “Infant Vision Development”

    Joining us from Brookfield, WI, Brandon Begotka speaks about the importance and developmental steps in infant vision development.



    Things you will learn in this episode:



    Although infants can only see a foot in front of them, their vision is critical to their development and survival. Their limited vision is beneficial and not overstimulating.. Family history, exposure to toxins, premature birth, complications with the birth, and alcoholism may play a negative role in the visual development. Crawling plays a large part in the developmental role and has many benefits. Skills like space and time are explored and a child may miss key developmental steps if he/she goes straight to walking. As children develop, primitive reflexes that were crucial for survival should disappear so they have more conscientious control of their body. However, they may reappear after a traumatic accident. Babies as young as six months can have an eye exam. Professionals would look for eye turns, high prescriptions, and eye disease. Simple things like moving the car seat to different positions or rearranging the room will allow an infant to explore more about their surroundings.



    Resources Mentioned:



    COVD Convention



    OEPF



    He recently lectured at the annual COVD conference about this same topic. The information he presented was so good that we wanted him to share it on the show!



    Thanks for listening!



    View his practice website here







    Comments, suggestions or if there is a guest you would like to hear on the show, let us know by email: dynamicduo@dynamicvisiontherapy.com

    • 28 min

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