5 episodios

On January 14, 2011 the North Carolina Journal of International Law and Comercial Regualtion hosted "Law and Pluralismin Asia: Exploring Dynamics of Reflection, Reinforcement, and Resistance. In recent years, Asian societies have experienced a growth in heterogeneity. Due to economic developments, there has been increased intraregional migration that redefines local demographics. For example, economic forces have driven migrant workers from Southeast Asia to resettle in parts of East Asia. Workers have also been migrating to Asia from other parts of the world. State policies have promoted this migration. For example, jurisdictions such as Singapore and Hong Kong have sought to attract educated "creative class" workers from all around the world. Finally, there has also been increasing diversity due to empowerment of local minority groups. The growing political legibility of gays and lesbians in Asia is but one example of this development. States in Asia have been instituting legal reforms to address these changing dynamics. This symposium will explore these sociolegal changes, examining how, in different ways, the law reflects, reinforces, and resists pluralism in Asia.
This symposium will be of interest to scholars, students, and human rights lawyers, as well as to business leaders whose work relates to Asia. The business community is impacted by legal responses to growing diversity in Asia-for example, changes to immigration laws, antidiscrimination policies, and protections of religious freedoms-because such legal responses affect the ability of companies in Asia to attract highly valuable foreign labor and to retain talented workers who might consider migrating to other parts of the world. Insofar as governments in Asia have reformed their laws to foster pluralism, businesses in Asia must stay informed on how to comply with new laws, such as antidiscrimination statutes that have been enacted in parts of Asia. Panelists include:
Kelley Loper, University of Hong Kong
Puja Kapai, University of Hong Kong
Wen-chen Chang, National Taiwan University
Illhyung Lee, University of Missouri
Apichai Shipper, University of California in Los Angeles
Timothy Webster, Yale University
Anil Kalhan, Drexel University
Carl Minzner, Washington University in St. Louis
Jeffrey Redding, St. Louis University School of Law
Meredith Weiss, University of Albany
Hyunah Yang, Seoul National University
Dian Shah, Duke University

Law and Pluralism in Asia - Video University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

    • Noticias y política

On January 14, 2011 the North Carolina Journal of International Law and Comercial Regualtion hosted "Law and Pluralismin Asia: Exploring Dynamics of Reflection, Reinforcement, and Resistance. In recent years, Asian societies have experienced a growth in heterogeneity. Due to economic developments, there has been increased intraregional migration that redefines local demographics. For example, economic forces have driven migrant workers from Southeast Asia to resettle in parts of East Asia. Workers have also been migrating to Asia from other parts of the world. State policies have promoted this migration. For example, jurisdictions such as Singapore and Hong Kong have sought to attract educated "creative class" workers from all around the world. Finally, there has also been increasing diversity due to empowerment of local minority groups. The growing political legibility of gays and lesbians in Asia is but one example of this development. States in Asia have been instituting legal reforms to address these changing dynamics. This symposium will explore these sociolegal changes, examining how, in different ways, the law reflects, reinforces, and resists pluralism in Asia.
This symposium will be of interest to scholars, students, and human rights lawyers, as well as to business leaders whose work relates to Asia. The business community is impacted by legal responses to growing diversity in Asia-for example, changes to immigration laws, antidiscrimination policies, and protections of religious freedoms-because such legal responses affect the ability of companies in Asia to attract highly valuable foreign labor and to retain talented workers who might consider migrating to other parts of the world. Insofar as governments in Asia have reformed their laws to foster pluralism, businesses in Asia must stay informed on how to comply with new laws, such as antidiscrimination statutes that have been enacted in parts of Asia. Panelists include:
Kelley Loper, University of Hong Kong
Puja Kapai, University of Hong Kong
Wen-chen Chang, National Taiwan University
Illhyung Lee, University of Missouri
Apichai Shipper, University of California in Los Angeles
Timothy Webster, Yale University
Anil Kalhan, Drexel University
Carl Minzner, Washington University in St. Louis
Jeffrey Redding, St. Louis University School of Law
Meredith Weiss, University of Albany
Hyunah Yang, Seoul National University
Dian Shah, Duke University

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