6 episodios

In a flipped class, students engage basic content outside of class, and class time is reserved for deeper, hands-on application activities. A flipped class is one that inverts the typical cycle of content acquisition and application so that students gain necessary knowledge before class, and instructors guide students to actively and interactively clarify and apply that knowledge during class.

This video collection highlights and describes some approaches to the "Flipped" classroom in use by faculty at the University of Texas at Austin. For additional information please visit The Flip Quick Start Guide: http://ctl.utexas.edu/teaching/flipping_a_class

The Flipped Classroom The University of Texas at Austin

    • Educación

In a flipped class, students engage basic content outside of class, and class time is reserved for deeper, hands-on application activities. A flipped class is one that inverts the typical cycle of content acquisition and application so that students gain necessary knowledge before class, and instructors guide students to actively and interactively clarify and apply that knowledge during class.

This video collection highlights and describes some approaches to the "Flipped" classroom in use by faculty at the University of Texas at Austin. For additional information please visit The Flip Quick Start Guide: http://ctl.utexas.edu/teaching/flipping_a_class

    Flipped Class Infographic

    Flipped Class Infographic

    This graphic provides a brief overview of the architecture of a flipped class.

    • video
    What is the flipped class?

    What is the flipped class?

    An explanation of the Flipped Class.

    • video
    Flipping Your Class: Roles and Expectations

    Flipping Your Class: Roles and Expectations

    Identify where the flipped model makes sense for your course.
    This guide is designed to walk you through the steps of flipping a single class; the process is scalable for flipping portions of each unit or an entire course. One of the major factors in course redesign is the time it takes to do it well. We recommend pilot testing the the flipped model with a single class before engaging in a complete redesign.

    The following questions can help you identify a good place to start, whether you have designed your course around learning outcomes or by units:

    What classes do you currently have an in-class activity that you rarely have time to complete during class and requires the students to apply their knowledge and skills?
    What concepts or topics do students struggle the most to understand based on exam scores and/or assignment grades?
    What topics would students benefit from the opportunity to apply the concepts within the classroom where your expertise could guide their development?

    Once you have narrowed down the possibilities, select a single class to use as you work through the rest of the design process.

    • 4 min
    • video
    Flipping Your Class: In-class Structures

    Flipping Your Class: In-class Structures

    Spend class time engaging students in application activities with feedback.
    a flipped classroom is where students engage in applying the course content and thinking in ways common to that field. Ideally, the learning activity builds in its level of challenge, so that misunderstandings and misconceptions are exposed.

    How might class time be repurposed in ways that will provide students with an appropriate level of challenge while leveraging your expertise as a coach or guide?

    Instructional Strategies

    If you have a learning activity that fits this criteria, then begin with that activity. If you have traditionally spent class time lecturing, then finding a structure that fits your discipline is important.

    There are a wide variety of evidence-based instructional approaches that create engaging class environments, here are a few approaches being used to create collaboration and problem solving in small and large classes at UT:

    Peer Instruction: Students prepare for class and give insrtuctors feedback about what they found confusing or difficult. During class, students experience cycles of mini-lectures interspersed with peer discussion of conceptual questions that work to elicit, confront, and resolve misconceptions students may hold.
    Team-based Learning (TBL): Students prepare before class and experience readiness-assurance quiz over the content at the start of class (first as individuals and then as a team). Teams get immediate feedback on their performance while instructors address gaps in understanding via mini-lectures. Next, teams engage in structured application activities that conclude with teams simultaneously making a specific choice.

    Case-based Learning: Students work together in small groups with guidance from the instructor to analyze the problem and evaluate a given course of action or decide on one of their own.
    Process-oriented Guided Inquiry Learning: POGIL activities are designed around the learning cycle where students explore data or information guided by questions, generate conclusions based on the data, and apply these concepts in new situations. The activites are structured to develop process skills, critical thinking, problem solving and collaboration. For more information visit POGIL.

    Assessment Strategies

    Assessment techniques can help inform and enhance learningwhen questions that measure student understanding are embedded into in-class learning activities:

    Provides students with feedback about what they know and do not know.
    Provides instructors with real-time data that informs instruction.
    Encourages students to engage during class by holding them accountable for their preparation.

    Technology-enhanced Learning

    A Classroom Response System (CRS) allows instructors to ask questions to the class, then immediately gather and display student responses. There are several clicker systems on the market for faculty to choose. iClicker is centrally supported and very popular among UT faculty

    • 4 min
    • video
    Flipped Classroom: Make connections between inside and outside of class learning

    Flipped Classroom: Make connections between inside and outside of class learning

    Once you have selected the class to flip, pull together the materials associated with that class (e.g. pre-class readings, lecture slides & notes, learning activity, and assignments associated with this material). Start with what you have and as you gain experience then explore and expand what you do inside and outside of class to help students learn.

    Organize the material you have gathered and organize it into three piles according to what students currently experience before, during, and after class. The crux of the Flipped model is to move the application-oriented "homework" into the classroom and to move the "lecture" to before class. We will walk you through each phase of the model, but first take what you have and see how it might be reorganized to fit this model. Here are a few questions to get you started in this process:

    What do I want my students to know and be able to do as result of completing this sequence of the course? How does it fit into the bigger picture of the unit and course?
    What part of the current "homework assignment" could be moved inside of class to help students practice applying the content? or What in-class learning activity is being rushed through because there is currently not enough time to do it well?
    What practice do students need inside of class to prepare them for the larger assignment tht will be completed after-class? Will students make the connection between what is happening inside of class and the assignment they are working on after class?
    What content do students need to know before class to successfully engage in the learning activity during class?

    The after-class portion may consist of a wide variety of activties including completing the work started in class or reading deeper about the topic or working together on a larger assignment that externds several class periods or practiciing on one's own. Again if you zoom out from this image, you would see that the after-class portion from one class occurs at the same time as before-class for the next class. This model is designed to help you organize your students learning and therefore is simplifying a more complex reality.

    • 2 min
    • video
    Flipped Classroom: Adapt your materials for students to acquire course content in preparation of class

    Flipped Classroom: Adapt your materials for students to acquire course content in preparation of class

    The dynamic and active environment that is created within the flipped classroom, means that it is essential for students to come prepared for class. Once you have a clear idea for how students will be asked to apply their knowledge and skills during class, then begin considering what students will need to read or view in advance of class. While online video content is associated with the Flipped classroom model, one can flip a class by repurposing traditional materials. Some common ways students prepare for class incude:

    Reading materials (e.g., textbook chapters or relevant articles)
    Online video and audio content (e.g., podcasts, videos, online micro-lectures, simulations, or demonstrations)

    Keep it simple at first by either relying on your current resources or using existing online content rather than creating your own. If you have time, then explore what content currently exists online that may help you supplement your resources. Whatever path you take, make sure that you...

    Hold students accountable for completing the pre-class assignment
    Provide students a way to pose questions about the content they are learning outside of class

    • 3 min

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