24 episodios

What do Americans and Chinese “know” about each other and how do they know it? What images do they have of each other’s society and state? Where do these images come from? Why do some endure and others change? How do images vary with age and other factors? How do these perceptions affect the decisions and actions of governments, businesses, civic groups, and individuals?

On November 1-2, 2013, leading academics will gather with pollsters, journalists, diplomats, and entertainment industry practitioners to explore these questions and questions and others at a conference hosted by the USC U.S.-China Institute.

Polls suggest that a slight majority of Americans believe that the values of Chinese and Americans are so different that cooperation to address international problems is impossible. Most Chinese feel the U.S. is working to constrain China’s continued rise. Americans and Chinese have increasingly negative impressions of each other’s countries. Yet, we are visiting each other’s countries more than ever before, becoming ever more intertwined, and are working cooperatively in many different ways to address pressing social, economic, and environmental issues. At the conference we’ll examine how these exchanges affect perceptions along with the even more powerful role played by new and old media, popular entertainment, and political discourse.

Through Tinted Lenses? How Chinese and Americans See Each Other (Audio Only) University of Southern California

    • Arte

What do Americans and Chinese “know” about each other and how do they know it? What images do they have of each other’s society and state? Where do these images come from? Why do some endure and others change? How do images vary with age and other factors? How do these perceptions affect the decisions and actions of governments, businesses, civic groups, and individuals?

On November 1-2, 2013, leading academics will gather with pollsters, journalists, diplomats, and entertainment industry practitioners to explore these questions and questions and others at a conference hosted by the USC U.S.-China Institute.

Polls suggest that a slight majority of Americans believe that the values of Chinese and Americans are so different that cooperation to address international problems is impossible. Most Chinese feel the U.S. is working to constrain China’s continued rise. Americans and Chinese have increasingly negative impressions of each other’s countries. Yet, we are visiting each other’s countries more than ever before, becoming ever more intertwined, and are working cooperatively in many different ways to address pressing social, economic, and environmental issues. At the conference we’ll examine how these exchanges affect perceptions along with the even more powerful role played by new and old media, popular entertainment, and political discourse.

    Ernest Wilson - Welcome, Through Tinted Lenses? Conference

    Ernest Wilson - Welcome, Through Tinted Lenses? Conference

    Ernest Wilson holds the Walter Annenberg Chair in Communication and heads the USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism. He has been an pioneering scholar, academic leader, public servant, and White House staffer. He taught at Michigan, Pennsylvania, and Maryland, led the Maryland Center for International Development and Conflict Management, served in the Clinton era National Security Council and U.S. Information Agency and advised both the Clinton and Obama transition teams. He served on the board of the Corporation for Public Broadcasting and was its chair for a year. His books include Governing Global Networks and The Information Revolution and Developing Countries.

    • 6 min
    Clayton Dube - Opening Remarks, Through Tinted Lenses? Conference

    Clayton Dube - Opening Remarks, Through Tinted Lenses? Conference

    Clayton Dube opened the USC U.S.-China Institute's "Through Tinted Lenses?" conference, arguing that the images and attitudes Americans and Chinese hold toward each other and each other's countries matter. Those images, he said, affect the decision-making of individuals, of businesses, and of governments. Dube noted how in the 2012 U.S. election politicians and political ad-makers sought to exploit ideas voters had about China and went on to discuss images that Chinese television viewers in the 1980s got of the U.S. from shows such as Hunter and how the more recent television program Prison Break offered a rather different portrayal of the U.S. Dube noted that today, Americans and Chinese have access to information about each other from far more sources than ever before, yet don't seem to like or trust the other as much as we once did. He invited the other participants and the audience to join in the exploration of dominant images, how they are formed and change, and how they affect policies and behavior.

    Clayton Dube has headed the USC U.S.-China Institute since it was established in 2006. Dube first lived and worked in China from 1982 to 1985 and has since visited often to carry out research, teach, or lead study tours. He teaches history and has received teaching awards at three universities.

    • 16 min
    David M. Lampton - Security-Relevant Perceptions in U.S.-China Relations: Elites and Society

    David M. Lampton - Security-Relevant Perceptions in U.S.-China Relations: Elites and Society

    David Lampton is Hyman Professor and Director of China Studies at the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies. Former president of the National Committee on United States-China Relations and Dean of Faculty at SAIS, he is the author of The Three Faces of Chinese Power: Might, Money, and Minds. A Stanford University graduate, Lampton has also received an honorary doctorate from the Russian Academy of Sciences' Institute of Far Eastern Studies. He is an Honorary Senior Fellow of the American Studies Institute of the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences. He won the Robert Scalapino Prize in 2010 and is a Gilman Scholar at Johns Hopkins. His newest book, Following the Leader: Ruling China, from Deng Xiaoping to Xi Jinping, will be published by UC Press in January 2014.

    • 17 min
    Tom Hollihan - U.S. Media Coverage of the Diaoyu-Senkaku Dispute

    Tom Hollihan - U.S. Media Coverage of the Diaoyu-Senkaku Dispute

    Tom Hollihan teaches communication at USC. His research and writing focuses on argumentation, political campaign communication, contemporary rhetorical criticism, and the impact of globalization on public deliberation. His many books include The Dispute Over the Diayou/Senkaku Islands: How Media Narratives Shape Public Opinions and Challenge the Global Order (forthcoming), Uncivil Wars: Political Campaigns in a Media Age, and Arguments and Arguing: The Products and Process of Human Decision Making (with Kevin Baaske). Hollihan has also advised candidates, officials, military leaders, and organization heads.

    • 23 min
    June Teufel Dreyer - Discussant for Panel 1: Security/Regional Disputes

    June Teufel Dreyer - Discussant for Panel 1: Security/Regional Disputes

    June Teufel Dreyer teaches political science at the University of Miami. She earned her doctorate at Harvard University. She is the author of China's Political System: Modernization and Tradition. Dreyer served for six years as a member of the U.S. -China Economic and Security Review Commission and has also been a member of the Chief of Naval Operations' Executive Panel. She has consulted on several influential documentaries and is a frequent writer and commentator on Chinese military affairs.

    • 12 min
    Minxin Pei - Discussant for Panel 1: Security/Regional Disputes

    Minxin Pei - Discussant for Panel 1: Security/Regional Disputes

    Minxin Pei is Tom and Margot Pritzker '72 Professor of Government and directs the Keck Center for International and Strategic Studies at Claremont McKenna College. A frequent contributor to the nation's op-ed pages and the author of many journal articles, Pei is also known for his books From Reform to Revolution: The Demise of Communism in China and the Soviet Union and China's Trapped Transition: The Limits of Developmental Autocracy. Before moving to Claremont McKenna, Pei headed the China program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.

    • 11 min

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