158 episodes

Helping connect us to purpose, take responsibility, and own the future.

If you take responsibility, you will own the future.

Now with the segment . . . WEAVER & LOOM: Where Destiny is Woven. Short solo segment with Lucas Skrobot, where we tell stories, discuss ancient wisdom, and weave our destiny.

Hosted by Lucas Skrobot

The Lucas Skrobot Show Lucas Skrobot

    • How To

Helping connect us to purpose, take responsibility, and own the future.

If you take responsibility, you will own the future.

Now with the segment . . . WEAVER & LOOM: Where Destiny is Woven. Short solo segment with Lucas Skrobot, where we tell stories, discuss ancient wisdom, and weave our destiny.

Hosted by Lucas Skrobot

    Totalitarian States (cults, groups, or ideology) denies freewill, thought, and individuality (part 1) [E155]

    Totalitarian States (cults, groups, or ideology) denies freewill, thought, and individuality (part 1) [E155]

    In this episode, I break down some of my thoughts from a previous episode with Dr Egnor (E153).
    If you see a group movement or state that denies the individual's though, variety of opinion, agency and replaces it with group identity, social constructionism, and uses fear based terror based tactics such as cancel culture, intimidation, isolation, and the deconstructing of the family unit you are likely to be dealing with a group with Totalitarian tendencies (if not be a full blow totalitarian movement).
    Links referenced in the show:
    Solomon Asch: http://psycnet.apa.org/psycinfo/1952-00803-001
    Nicolae Ceausescu LAST SPEECH: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wWIbCtz_Xwk
    The Greengrocer: Power of the Powerless by Vaclav Havel: https://www.nonviolent-conflict.org/wp-content/uploads/1979/01/the-power-of-the-powerless.pdf
    Until next time…
    Be a change maker, take responsibility, own the future.
    Thank you for listening, and as always you can find me at:
    WhatsApp: +1-202-922-0220
    LucasSkrobot.com
    Tiktok: https://www.tiktok.com/@lucasskrobot
    LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/lucasskrobot
    Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/lucasskrobot

    • 39 min
    How to process trauma through writing - Dr James Pennebaker (part 2 of 2) [E154]

    How to process trauma through writing - Dr James Pennebaker (part 2 of 2) [E154]

    How can we take responsibility for the pain in our lives and not pass that pain on?
    Our words have the potential to release us from the perpetual pain of traumatic experiences.
    In the second part of my conversation with Dr. James Pennebaker, we discuss healthy ways individuals can process traumatic experiences and the power of expressive writing.
    Dr. Pennebaker is a social psychologist and currently holds the position of the Regents Centennial Professor of Liberal Arts at the University of Texas at Austin.
    His work highlights the effects of natural language on the mental and physical health of people. In this conversation, we discuss his work Open Up by Writing it Down and the practical advice he offers to people processing pain.
    Find more conversations like this one at lucasskrobot.com  or contact me through WhatsApp at +12029220220. Go out and own the future.
    Key takeaways:
    Creating distance immediately following a traumatic experience is helpful—do not neglect this part of the process. People who do not voice their emotions through spoken or written words often experience physical sickness at a higher rate. Writing about your experience adds structure and objectivity to your thoughts. If you change your behaviors and thoughts, your language will follow. Language is a reflection of what is happening inside of you. References:
    The Secret Life of Pronouns: What Our Words Say About Us
    Open Up by Writing it Down
    Anchored: The Discipline to Stop Drifting
     
    What to listen for:
    1:21     Distraction can be a healthy coping process immediately following trauma.
    9:10     In the right timing, writing acts as a healing exercise to process trauma.
    12:59   Can writing make a difference about something that happened several years ago?
    14:51   Unprocessed pain can result in physical ailments, so what are some strategies to process these experiences?
    18:10   People are their own best therapists. There is no right way to process pain.  
    20:38   Should a person work to change their language or behaviors first?
    25:51   Debrief: taking responsibility for your emotions
    33:00   Challenges to implement into your life this week
    Quotes:
    “By putting it on paper people will change their behaviors because they are looking at it from a more objective perspective.” [12:50]
    “You’re responsible for the problems you’ve got—responsible in the sense that you’re the one that is dealing with them. Sit down and see what works.” [19:40]
    Thank you for being a dedicated listener. Without you–we would not be here.
    I would love to hear from you–WhatsApp me at +1-202-922-0220 Here you can ask question about anything that happened on the show. I look forward to hearing from you.
    Until next time…
    Be a change maker, take responsibility, own the future.
    Thank you for listening, and as always you can find me at:
    WhatsApp: +1-202-922-0220
    LucasSkrobot.com
    Tiktok
    LinkedIn
    Instagram

    • 37 min
    Detecting lies and understanding personality through language - Dr James Pennebaker (part 1 of 2) [E153]

    Detecting lies and understanding personality through language - Dr James Pennebaker (part 1 of 2) [E153]

    Did you know your usage of pronouns and prepositions might reveal parts of your personality that you’re not even aware of? Language is powerful, even the words you don’t even think about, like pronouns.
    Our guest Dr. James Pennebaker is a social psychologist and currently holds the position of the Regents Centennial Professor of Liberal Arts at the University of Texas at Austin. He studies the ways emotional experiences, natural language, and physical and mental health all affect one another.
    We discuss the language used by the President and former Presidents, analyses of the language used during coronavirus as an indicator of mental well-being, and findings presented in his most recent book, The Secret Life of Pronouns: What Our Words Say About Us. https://amzn.to/3dARYra
    Find more conversations like this one at lucasskrobot.com  or contact me through WhatsApp at +12029220220. Go out and own the future.
    Key takeaways:
    James Pennebaker’s work was born out of a need to base psychological on real-world behaviors. Some parts of speech are processed in the brain differently than others. Knowing this, one can understand people better through the language they use. When analyzing the language used by people during the coronavirus pandemic, Dr. Pennebaker found significant increases in anxious language and a decrease in language suggesting anger. This is beginning to reverse. What to listen for:
    01:44   How did you, as a social psychologist, decide to study people’s words?
    6:33     Dr. Pennebaker discusses his findings of his language analyzing software, Linguistic Inquiry & Word Count (LIWC), which countered stereotypical perceptions about gender and language patterns.
    10:19   How do we process various components of language differently in our brains?
    20:00   Deceit is very difficult to detect, even for computers. Dr. Pennebaker explains why.
    25:06   Pronoun usage provides insight into how a person, even the President of the United States, might be thinking.  
    31:58   Analysis of Trump and Obama’s tweets while in office
    35:20   Pronoun usage can indicate states of mental health.
    36:40   What are you seeing through language analyses happening during the COVID-19 pandemic?
    43:08   What will the future look like after COVID-19?
     
    Reference materials:
    The Secret Life of Pronouns: What Our Words Say About Us
    Open Up by Writing it Down
    Linguistic Inquiry & Word Count
    The Online Research Consortium
    Quotes:
    “Early on I became a little bit appalled that so much of social psychology was based on questionnaires.
    We didn’t look at what people were actually doing, we just asked them what they thought they were doing.” [02:55]
    “It wasn’t that I was interested in language, but as a tool to understand people it turned out to be an unbelievably rich source of information” [10:02]
    “What the hell is going on in our culture that tweets are a form of conversation?” [33:29]
    Thank you for being a dedicated listener. Without you–we would not be here.
    I would love to hear from you–WhatsApp me at +1-202-922-0220 Here you can ask question about anything that happened on the show. I look forward to hearing from you.
    Until next time…
    Be a change maker, take responsibility, own the future.
    Thank you for listening, and as always you can find me at:
    WhatsApp: +1-202-922-0220
    LucasSkrobot.com
    Tiktok
    LinkedIn
    Instagram

    • 46 min
    Dr. Michael Egnor | Free Will and Totalitarian Ideologies (Part 2 of 2) [E152]

    Dr. Michael Egnor | Free Will and Totalitarian Ideologies (Part 2 of 2) [E152]

    In part two of my discussion with Dr. Michael R. Egnor, we continue our discussion about neurophilosophy.
    In this episode, Dr. Egnor brings attention to the importance of embracing the free will of humanity.
    Dr. Egnor is an award-winning brain surgeon and a research professor of Neurosurgery and Pediatrics at the State University of New York.
    You can find additional articles written by Dr. Egnor at discovery.org. 
    Key takeaways:
    Logical reasoning alongside empirical evidence of physics concludes humans have free will. Experiments in neuroscience also affirm the existence of a free will. Denying free will has societal consequences; for instance, totalitarian states are founded in the denial of free will. References:
    Articles by Dr. Michael Egnor
     
    What to listen for:
    1:30     Humans are the only thing in creation that bridges the material and immaterial. 3:31     How do we know that we have a free will? Reasons of logic and physics point to free will. 7:07     Physicists in the 1970s asked questions about free will and tested the idea through experiments which concluded that observation itself is a form of creation in the universe. 11:34   Neuroscience asked similar questions. Wilder Penfield and Benjamin Libet pioneered the question of free will in the department of neuroscience. 22:11   What are the consequences of believing things like determinism or materialism? 32:55   Individuals who even think of free will are lethal to a totalitarian state. Personal agency is the antidote to totalitarianism. 39:08   How should we analyze the governmental response to COVID-19 through a free-will affirming lens? 44:36   Dr. Egnor’s final takeaway for the listeners. 48:40   Concluding comments Quotes:
    “Free will is essential to human dignity.” 21:45
    “The denial of free will is the cornerstone of totalitarian systems.” 31:00
    Thank you for being a dedicated listener. Without you--we would not be here.
    I would love to hear from you--WhatsApp me at +1-202-922-0220 Here you can ask question about anything that happened on the show. I look forward to hearing from you.
    Until next time…
    Be a change maker, take responsibility, own the future.
    Thank you for listening, and as always you can find me at:
    WhatsApp: +1-202-922-0220
    LucasSkrobot.com
    Tiktok
    LinkedIn
    Instagram

    • 54 min
    Dr. Michael Egnor | Neurosurgery, Materialism vs Dualism, and Intention (Part 1 of 2) [E151]

    Dr. Michael Egnor | Neurosurgery, Materialism vs Dualism, and Intention (Part 1 of 2) [E151]

    Dr. Michael R. Egnor discusses the intersection of philosophy and neuroscience in today’s episode.
    He is a research professor of Neurosurgery and Pediatrics at the State University of New York.
    As an award-winning brain surgeon, Dr. Egnor brings a unique perspective to our discussion about the difference between the mind and the brain.
    You can find additional articles written by Dr. Egnor at discovery.org.
    Key takeaways:
    While operating on brains becomes easier with time, the interpersonal and emotional challenges of the job persist throughout the years. Modern materialism takes materialism to the extreme and suggests that we’re “just the machine.” The mind transcends the material. Aristotle suggested that one comes to know things by knowing both their form and matter. Humans are both body, soul, and spirit. What to listen for:
    01:45   Dr. Egnor describes what it is like to operate on a person’s brain. While he likens the operation to typing or playing the piano, he acknowledges the emotional and interpersonal challenges in his job. 09:01   Dr. Egnor explains his dualistic understanding of the mind vs. the brain. 16:29   The mind differs from the brain because it has the property of intentionality. 22:08   Dr. Egnor provides a thought experiment to explain that minds must transcend materials—the zombie problem. 24:02   How do human minds differ from other species? 28:41   Dr. Egnor explains the Aristotelian-Thomistic understanding of the mind.             Reference materials:
    Articles by Dr. Michael Egnor
    Quotes:
    “My wife jokes with me that meeting me is always the worst part of a person’s life.” 03:45
    “The mind is the antithesis of computation.” 16:29
    “We are a soul and body as one unit. The soul has powers of intellect and will. Though they are involved with the body, they do not come from the body.” 38:30
     “Human beings have a spirit in the sense that there are powers of the human mind that do not come from matter.” 44:20
     
    Thank you for being a dedicated listener. Without you--we would not be here.
    I would love to hear from you--WhatsApp me at +1-202-922-0220 Here you can ask question about anything that happened on the show. I look forward to hearing from you.
    Until next time…
    Be a change maker, take responsibility, own the future.
    Thank you for listening, and as always you can find me at:
    WhatsApp: +1-202-922-0220
    LucasSkrobot.com
    Tiktok
    LinkedIn
    Instagram

    • 47 min
    Dr Stephen Hicks - Cultural Marxism, Colonialism and Racial Rhetoric (Part 2 of 2) [E150]

    Dr Stephen Hicks - Cultural Marxism, Colonialism and Racial Rhetoric (Part 2 of 2) [E150]

    In this episode, Dr. Stephen Hicks (@SRCHicks) and I continue our conversation about the fruits of radical Marxism.
    He elaborates on the danger of prioritizing the collective over the individual and explains the process through which individuals adopt their worldviews.
    Dr. Stephen Hicks is a professor of Philosophy at Rockford University, the executive director of the Center for Ethics and Entrepreneurship, and a senior scholar for The Atlas Society.
    I discuss his book, Explaining Postmodernism: Skepticism and Socialism from Rousseau to Foucault, to conclude this episode. Thanks for listening. Go out and own the future.
    What to listen for:
    How did colonialism impact countries like Zimbabwe or Botswana? 02:27 In what ways does Marxism appear in contemporary activists’ appeals? How do people adopt their worldviews? 5:28 Is there a difference between Marxism and Socialism? 12:28 Is there harm in prioritizing the collective? 12:56 Where might racist rhetoric lead us? 23:22 Discussion of Dr. Stephen Hicks’s book Explaining Postmodernism: Skepticism and Socialism from Rousseau to Foucault 28:22  
    Reference materials:
    For more content by Dr. Stephen Hicks
    Open College Podcast—Free Speech; Why The Philosophy Matters
    Explaining Postmodernism: Skepticism and Socialism from Rousseau to Foucault
    Thank you for being a dedicated listener. Without you--we would not be here.
    I would love to hear from you--WhatsApp me at +1-202-922-0220 Here you can ask question about anything that happened on the show. I look forward to hearing from you.
    Until next time…
    Be a change maker, take responsibility, own the future.
    Thank you for listening, and as always you can find me at:
    WhatsApp: +1-202-922-0220
    LucasSkrobot.com
    Tiktok
    LinkedIn
    Instagram

    • 43 min

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