185 épisodes

The Divinity School is the graduate professional school for the academic study of religion at the University of Chicago, founded in 1891. The dominant ethos of the school -- toward the cultivation of new knowledge through research -- imbues the Ph.D. and masters programs (M.A., M.Div., A.M.R.S.). Our faculty and students engage in advanced research in pursuit of new knowledge about the human phenomenon of religion, as viewed from the broadest possible range of perspectives. Our faculty represent an unparalleled depth of expertise in major world religions throughout their historical periods, and in other religious movements, past and present, in a manner that is deeply informed, rigorously critical, and honestly engaged.

Divinity School (audio) The University of Chicago

    • Religion et spiritualité
    • 4.0 • 1 note

The Divinity School is the graduate professional school for the academic study of religion at the University of Chicago, founded in 1891. The dominant ethos of the school -- toward the cultivation of new knowledge through research -- imbues the Ph.D. and masters programs (M.A., M.Div., A.M.R.S.). Our faculty and students engage in advanced research in pursuit of new knowledge about the human phenomenon of religion, as viewed from the broadest possible range of perspectives. Our faculty represent an unparalleled depth of expertise in major world religions throughout their historical periods, and in other religious movements, past and present, in a manner that is deeply informed, rigorously critical, and honestly engaged.

    Flipping the Classroom: How Online Resources Enable Pedagogical Innovation with Christine Hayes

    Flipping the Classroom: How Online Resources Enable Pedagogical Innovation with Christine Hayes

    If you experience any technical difficulties with this video or would like to make an accessibility-related request, please send a message to digicomm@uchicago.edu.

    Led by Christine Hayes (Yale University). The classic frontal lecture aimed at delivering content in real time is the mainstay of many university courses. How might classroom instruction be reimagined when content is delivered through online lectures in virtual time? This workshop explores the changing role of the instructor and the transformation of the classroom from lecture hall to learning laboratory in the digital age.

    Christine Hayes is Robert F. and Patricia R. Weis Professor of Religious Studies in Classical Judaica. Before joining the Yale faculty in 1996, she was Assistant Professor of Hebrew Studies in the Department of Near Eastern Studies at Princeton University for three years. Her published works include several books and many articles in Vetus Testamentum, The Journal for the Study of Judaism, The Harvard Theological Review, and various scholarly anthologies. Her first book, entitled Between the Babylonian and Palestinian Talmuds (Oxford University Press, 1997) was honored with a Salo Baron prize for a first book in Jewish thought and literature, awarded by the American Academy for Jewish Research (1999).

    The Craft of Teaching (CoT) is the Divinity School's program of pedagogical development for its graduate students, dedicated to preparing a new generation of accomplished educators in the field of religious studies. We bring together Divinity School faculty, current students, and an extensive alumni network of decorated teachers to share our craft and to advance critical reflection on religious studies pedagogy.

    • 47 min
    Laurie L. Patton, 2015 Alumna of the Year, on "Grandmother Language"

    Laurie L. Patton, 2015 Alumna of the Year, on "Grandmother Language"

    If you experience any technical difficulties with this video or would like to make an accessibility-related request, please send a message to digicomm@uchicago.edu.

    Laurie L. Patton (AM 1986, PhD 1991 in the History of Religions area) the Divinity School's Alumna of the Year for 2015, delivers her public lecture entitled "Grandmother Language: A Chicagoan Sojourn with Women, Sanskrit and The Ethnography of Reading.”

    See more: http://divinity.uchicago.edu/laurie-l-patton

    • 1h 23 min
    The 2010 Divinity School Alumnus of the Year Lecture, by Robert Michael Franklin, Jr.

    The 2010 Divinity School Alumnus of the Year Lecture, by Robert Michael Franklin, Jr.

    If you experience any technical difficulties with this video or would like to make an accessibility-related request, please send a message to digicomm@uchicago.edu.

    Robert Michael Franklin, Jr., Ph.D., the Divinity School’s Alumnus of the Year for 2010, delivers his Alumnus of the Year lecture.

    See more: http://divinity.uchicago.edu/robert-michael-franklin

    • 1h 25 min
    2015 Marty Center Senior Fellow Symposium with Betty M. Bayer

    2015 Marty Center Senior Fellow Symposium with Betty M. Bayer

    If you experience any technical difficulties with this video or would like to make an accessibility-related request, please send a message to digicomm@uchicago.edu.

    Encountering When Prophecy Fails, Encountering Cognitive Dissonance: A Forum

    When Prophecy Fails was published in 1956 and is considered a “classic” by many in the field of social psychology and, arguably, in religious studies (e.g., in history of religions, biblical studies) and other fields as well.
    Like many such works, the book as its theory of cognitive dissonance has shaped numerous fields – and wider culture – in ways often unacknowledged. But how do the book and its theory speak to us today? How best to understand the long resonances of this book and its theory within academic study and in everyday life? Does the book’s popularity tell us anything about the book’s influence on religion, psychology and science? Did the book alter the object of knowledge in religion and/or in psychology? Does critical reflection suggest new ways to think about the religion, science and psychology relation that moves beyond applying psychological models to religious experience or using religious or spiritual experience to secure psychological concepts or evidence?

    This symposium will begin with a brief talk on the history of the books' nearly sixty years. Several scholars will join Dr. Bayer to offer further reflection on their own use of the book in their teaching and research. Together these trackings and tracings lend themselves to what may be called an ethnography of encounters with the life-world of a book, its ideas,
    culture, habitus of its catchy concept of cognitive dissonance, and spheres of action amongst religion, psychology and science.

    FORUM PARTICIPANTS:

    Lowell Bloss, Professor Emeritus of Religious Studies and of Asian Languages and Cultures, (University of Chicago Divinity School, History of Religion, PhD 1972)
    W. Clark Gilpin, Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus of the History of Christianity and Theology in the Divinity School; also in the College; Interim Director of the Martin Marty Center for the Advanced Study of Religion

    Susan E. Henking, President, Shimer College (University of Chicago Divinity School, Religion and Psychological Studies, PhD 1988).
    Seth Patterson, MFA, a professional theater artist and current M.Div. student, will provide a dramatic reading.
    Betty M. Bayer is professor of Women’s Studies at Hobart and William Smith Colleges in Geneva, NY, where she teaches courses on notions of human nature in histories of women’s psyche, imagining peace, and debates amongst psychology, science, religion and spirituality. Most recently, she has published essays on spirituality and Enchantment in an Age of Occupy (2012). While a senior fellow at the Martin Marty Center she will be working on her book “Revelation or Revolution? Cognitive Dissonance and Persistent Longing in an Age Psychological.” This book entails a history and rethinking of the renowned 1956 book When Prophecy Fails by social psychologists Leon Festinger, Henry Riecken and Stanley Schachter.

    • 1h 32 min
    Wednesday Lunch with the Enhancing Life Project

    Wednesday Lunch with the Enhancing Life Project

    If you experience any technical difficulties with this video or would like to make an accessibility-related request, please send a message to digicomm@uchicago.edu.

    The Enhancing Life Project team will speak on this three-year grant project funded by the John Templeton Foundation. The project will draw together 35 international scholars to address the profound expansion of human power through technology, as well as advances in genetics, ecology, and other fields that impact both the vulnerability and the enhancement of life. William Schweiker, the Edward L. Ryerson Distinguished Service Professor of Theological Ethics, will be joined by his two colleagues from Bochum University colleague Günter Thomas.

    Wednesday Lunch is a Divinity School tradition started many decades ago. At noon on Wednesdays when the quarter is in session a delicious vegetarian meal is made in the Swift Hall kitchen by our student chefs and lunch crew. Once the three-course meal has reached dessert each week there is a talk by a faculty member or student from throughout the University, a community member from the greater Chicago area, or a guest from a wider distance. Many times these talks focus on various aspects of religion in public life and the academic study of religion, but not always. Sometimes there are musical performances instead of a talk. All are welcome (you do not have to be a Divinity School student or faculty or staff to come.

    • 58 min
    Islam, Music, and the Divine | A Mellon Islamic Studies Initiative event (audio)

    Islam, Music, and the Divine | A Mellon Islamic Studies Initiative event (audio)

    If you experience any technical difficulties with this video or would like to make an accessibility-related request, please send a message to digicomm@uchicago.edu.

    See more at: http://divinity.uchicago.edu/Mellon-Islamic-Studies-Initiative2

    Sufism today has gained widespread interest mainly through its music and poetry, but also through its contrast with orthodox scriptural Islam. Sufism stands for an inclusive Islam focused on personal love of God and spiritual guidance within a wide range of devotional practices. Music and mystical poetry are the sonic embodiment of Sufism and its worldwide placeholder in the search for spiritual goals. Sufi, thus, can designate a broader spectrum of vernacular devotional and ritual identities. The core idea for this workshop allows us to approach this near-global vogue of a Sufi Imaginary through its music.

    “Islam and Sufism” also brings into conversation a range of ideascapes and practices, from the traditional South Asian spiritual lineages to a new generation of Muslim popular culture. Sufi music is founded in ritual and its constraints, but its practice is also open to creative agency. Reaching for the gift of the sublime enables embodied engagement on multiple levels—through rhythm, repetition of words, even ecstatic dance, to reach for the gift of the sublime, individually or collectively.

    Panel 1:
    The Sublime and Music: Islam and the West
    Regula Qureshi and Philip V. Bohlman in Conversation
    Discussant: Michael Sells

    Recitation and Discussion of Poetry
    Michael Sells, Love Lyrics of Ibn al-Farid and Ibn al-`Arabi
    Saleem Qureshi, Sublime Rebellion: Iqbal's Urdu and Farsi Verse
    Chair: Thibaut d'Hubert

    Colloquy 1
    Deborah A. Kapchan, Witnessing the Sublime: Sufi Samaa in Secular France
    Moderator: Hakan Karateke


    Music and Sublime Across the Muslim World
    Bertie Kibreah, Sufi Tattva: The Sound and Space of Mystical Song in Bangladesh
    Shayna Silverstein, Performing Sacred Popular: Syrian Sufi Dance as National Heritage
    Michael O’Toole, Staging the Sublime: Music and Islam on Stage in Germany
    Lauren Osborne, Locating Experience and Emotion in the Recited Qur'an
    Moderator: Marcia K. Hermansen

    The Labor of Sublimity: A Conversation
    Kaley Mason, Robert L. Kendrick, Regula Qureshi

    Colloquy 2
    Peter L. Manuel, Qawwali as the Anti-Sublime
    Moderator: Regula Qureshi

    • 1h 6 min

Avis d’utilisateurs

4.0 sur 5
1 note

1 note

Nioukhoussa ,

bible louis second

je voudrais avoir la traduction de la bible louis second en francais
please i want to have a traduction for bible louis second in french

Classement des podcasts dans Religion et spiritualité

D’autres se sont aussi abonnés à

Plus par The University of Chicago