7 épisodes

Earth Tones is a limited weekly podcast covering groundbreaking environmental research by University of Washington students, faculty, and affiliates. Hosts Alanna Greene and Rachel Fricke explore the intricacies of human interactions with the natural world through science storytelling with guest aquatic, terrestrial, and atmospheric scientists.

Earth Tones UW's Sound Bite Network

    • Sciences de la Terre

Earth Tones is a limited weekly podcast covering groundbreaking environmental research by University of Washington students, faculty, and affiliates. Hosts Alanna Greene and Rachel Fricke explore the intricacies of human interactions with the natural world through science storytelling with guest aquatic, terrestrial, and atmospheric scientists.

    What’s the deal with Salmon?

    What’s the deal with Salmon?

    Salmon have such an ecological, environmental, and cultural importance. Very locally relevant,
    they have seen significant declines in the last decade, as less and less are returning to their natal streams to spawn each year. This has pretty gnarly implications for not only salmon, but the organisms that rely on them for food, like whales, bears, and forests, to name a few. Alex Lincoln (https://alexlincoln.weebly.com/) joins the podcast to discuss her research on the relationship between bears and sockeye salmon in Alaska.

    • 21 min
    Songs of Science

    Songs of Science

    Whether you are in academia or otherwise, you are likely well acquainted with data regarding climate change. While this information is undoubtedly important to pay attention to, it can become both mentally and emotionally taxing. Judy Twedt, an interdisciplinary PhD student at UW, specializes in making this data a lot more enjoyable. Through climate data sonification, Judy weaves together data sets and digital sound arts to create soundtracks that bring greater expression to climate communication. You can learn more about Judy’s work and listen to her sonification projects on her website: https://www.judytwedt.com.

    • 27 min
    Ground Zero for Landslides

    Ground Zero for Landslides

    The Oso Landslide of 2014 devastated a community near the Stillaguamish River in Washington, leaving lawsuits and deaths in its wake. This disastrous event raised important questions regarding landslide prediction, mitigation, and future land use. Now, current technology allows researchers like UW’s Sean Lahusen to dig beneath the surface to find hidden clues left from landslides in years past, which can reveal a region’s vulnerability to future landslides. You can read about Sean’s research here: https://bit.ly/2DGs2dP

    • 17 min
    The Big One

    The Big One

    Chatter about the big earthquake destined to destroy the West Coast has seen an uptick in the past few years thanks to an article published by the New Yorker (https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2015/07/20/the-really-big-one). To deconstruct the story and figure out how concerned West Coast resident should be about The Big One, we chat with Erik Fredrickson of UW’s Oceanography Department. Erik’s work focuses on understanding deep sea subduction zones and seafloor dynamics, particularly in relation to the Cascadia Subduction Zone.

    • 22 min
    Clever Crows – Why They’re Smarter Than You Think

    Clever Crows – Why They’re Smarter Than You Think

    In urban and suburban neighborhoods, it seems like crows are everywhere – retrieving food from our garbage cans, digging up our lawns, even pooping on us. These clever corvids have a long history of interacting with humans, and possess an incredible intellectual capacity for identifying those they can trust. Here we talk to Loma Pendergraft of UW’s Avian Conservation Lab to learn more about crow cognition and understand why he has to disguise himself while studying crows in the field. You can learn more about Loma’s work on his website (https://www.lomapendergraft.com/).

    • 22 min
    What’s With All These Wildfires?

    What’s With All These Wildfires?

    Inhabitants of the American West are well-acquainted with wildfires (news clip courtesy ABC, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r906ikuszjA&t=118s). These large infernos are particularly associated with California, and the state has weathered many of its most destructive fires on record in only the past few summers. In this episode, we chat with Michelle Agne to learn more about wildfire disturbances and their implications for forests and human communities. You can learn more about Michelle on the Harvey Lab website (https://depts.washington.edu/bjhlab/lab-members/) and follow her latest discoveries on Twitter (https://twitter.com/michelle_agne).

    • 21 min

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