53 épisodes

FHI Events Duke University

    • Livres

    • video
    Little Freedoms: Immigrant Labor & the Politics of Fast Fashion with Jessamyn Hatcher

    Little Freedoms: Immigrant Labor & the Politics of Fast Fashion with Jessamyn Hatcher

    This talk investigates the use of fast fashion -- cheap chic pedaled by behemoths such as Zara and H&M -- by a group of undocumented immigrant women who wear the clothes to labor in New York City's nail salons. In the wake of Rana Plaza, how can we move forward with a critique of fast fashion that accounts for the diversity of users and uses?
    Jessamyn Hatcher teaches fashion studies and the humanities in the Global Liberal Studies program at New York University. She is working on a book about the politics of fast fashion. She is the co-editor, with Cathy N. Davidson, of No More Separate Spheres!: A Next Wave American Studies Reader (Duke University Press).

    Learn more at http://sites.fhi.duke.edu/phdlab/!

    • 1h 16 min
    • video
    Public Books: A Conversation with Sharon Marcus

    Public Books: A Conversation with Sharon Marcus

    Launched in 2012, Public Books is an online monthly review magazine devoted to spirited debate about books and the arts and was recently named a "Best Site" by the Daily Beast. Publishing timely, provocative essays that bring academic ideas to bear on recently published works of fiction, non-fiction, and media culture, Public Books establishes a forum where scholars can write in a publicly appealing voice, develop strong arguments, and bring their deep knowledge of their subjects to bear on important questions that define both public debate and important scholarship." In this conversation with FHI Director Ian Baucom, Public Books fiction editor Sharon Marcus discusses the project in detail, with a particular interest in engaging the Duke public and potential reviewers and writers.
    Sharon Marcus is the Orlando Harriman Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Columbia University. Her specializations include 19th century French and English literature, architecture and urbanism, and feminist theory and LGBT studies. Her books include Apartment Stories: City and Home in Nineteenth-Century Paris and London (University of California Press, 1999) and Between Women: Friendship, Desire, and Marriage in Victorian England (Princeton: 2007). Marcus has won a myriad of awards and fellowships, including the Fulbright, Woodrow Wilson, and ACLS fellowships, the Lambda Literary award for best book in LGBT studies, and the Perkins Prize for best study of narrative, among others.

    • 1h 3 min
    • video
    Defining Lines: Cartography in the Age of Empire at the Nasher

    Defining Lines: Cartography in the Age of Empire at the Nasher

    BorderWork(s) Lab (http://sites.fhi.duke.edu/borderworks/) students Elizabeth Blackwood, Mary Kate Cash, Katie Contess, Rachel Fleder, Lauren Jackson, Jordan Noyes, and Jeremy Tripp led a gallery tour of Defining Lines: Cartography in the Age of Empire (http://sites.fhi.duke.edu/defininglines/).
    Defining Lines is on view at Duke's Nasher Museum from September 9 - December 15, 2013. This student-curated installation draws exclusively from the holdings of Duke University's David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library and explores the mutual relationships between maps and empires.
    As imperial colonial structures rose, consolidated, and ultimately collapsed, the legacy of how their maps delineated colonial holdings, visualized spaces, and reinforced control remains with us. As varied and conflicted as their purposes and perspectives may be, maps continue to function as a powerful and popular medium through which we understand the world and the man-made lines that define and ultimately control it.

    The BorderWork(s) Lab is housed at the Franklin Humanities Institute (http://fhi.duke.edu/) and supported by the Mellon Foundation Humanities Writ Large grant (http://humanitieswritlarge.duke.edu/).

    • 25 min
    • video
    Trading Races, A Historical Role Playing Game by Adeline Koh

    Trading Races, A Historical Role Playing Game by Adeline Koh

    Trading Races is an elaborate paper-based role-playing game set at the University of Michigan in April 2003. Players take on the roles of real historical characters and multi-ethnic and multi-national members of an imaginary Student Assembly as they tackle the Supreme Court affirmative action cases brought against the university. Adeline Koh is Director of DH@Stockton and and assistant professor of literature at Richard Stockton College in NJ. She came to Duke on a fellowship.

    • 58 min
    • video
    PAL: Writing is Thinking II

    PAL: Writing is Thinking II

    Writing is Thinking II: Taking It to the Next Level, a writing event and workshop sponsored by the Center for Philosophy, Arts and Literature (PAL), The Thompson Writing Program, and the Graduate School, built on the concepts introduced in the original workshop held on Friday, January 28, 2011, titled “Writing as Thinking: Writing as a Way of Life in the Academy.”
    Here, the next step was taken by posing key questions necessary to the graduate student writer. How do we figure out what to keep and what to throw away? How do we revise without fear and without tears? Among the key questions are: how to be your own editor, how to cut without fear, how to peer review, how to make your writing clearer.

    Writing is Thinking II provides a unique opportunity for graduate students and other young scholars at Duke to develop their craft and to get inspiration for their future life of writing and thinking.

    • 2 h 50 min
    • video
    A Conversation with Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

    A Conversation with Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

    Chimamanda Adichie, author of the novels Purple Hibiscus (2003), Half of a Yellow Sun (2006), and the short story collection That Thing Around Your Neck (2009), discusses her work with the Africa Initiative, a co-sponsored event with the Center for African and Africa American Research . Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie was born in Nigeria in 1977. She has received numerous awards and distinctions, including the Orange Broadband Prize for Fiction (2007) and a MacArthur Foundation Fellowship (2008). Half of a Yellow Sun is set to be released this year as a major motion picture starring Thandie Newton and 12 Years a Slave's star Chiwetel Ejiofor.

    • 1h 38 min

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