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Foot & Ankle International (FAI), in publication since 1980, is the official journal of the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS). This monthly medical journal emphasizes surgical and medical management as it relates to the foot and ankle with a specific focus on reconstructive, trauma, and sports-related conditions utilizing the latest technological advances.

Foot and Ankle Orthopaedics SAGE Publications

    • Sciences

Foot & Ankle International (FAI), in publication since 1980, is the official journal of the American Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle Society (AOFAS). This monthly medical journal emphasizes surgical and medical management as it relates to the foot and ankle with a specific focus on reconstructive, trauma, and sports-related conditions utilizing the latest technological advances.

    FAI October 2020: Comparison of Patients’ and Surgeons’ Expectations in Foot and Ankle Surgery

    FAI October 2020: Comparison of Patients’ and Surgeons’ Expectations in Foot and Ankle Surgery

    Aligning patient and surgeon expectations may improve patient satisfaction and outcomes. This study aimed to assess differences in expectations of foot and ankle surgery between patients and their surgeons.
    In conclusion, more than two-thirds of patients had significantly higher expectations than their surgeons. Higher BMI was associated with higher patient than surgeon expectations. These results emphasize the importance for foot and ankle surgeons to adequately educate patients preoperatively.
     
    To view the article click here.

    • 12 min
    FAI September 2020: Comparison Between Polyvinyl Alcohol Implant and Cheilectomy With Moberg Osteotomy for Hallux Rigidus

    FAI September 2020: Comparison Between Polyvinyl Alcohol Implant and Cheilectomy With Moberg Osteotomy for Hallux Rigidus

    In 2016, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the use of a polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) hydrogel implant for the surgical management of hallux rigidus. Though recent studies have evaluated the safety and efficacy of the implant, no study has compared outcomes following PVA implantation with those following traditional joint-preserving procedures for hallux rigidus, such as cheilectomy with Moberg osteotomy. The purpose of this study was to compare clinical and patient-reported outcomes for patients undergoing cheilectomy and Moberg osteotomy, with or without PVA implant, at a single multisurgeon academic center.
    In conclusion, though our results generally support the safety and utility of the PVA implant as previously established by the clinical trial, at 1 to 2 years of follow-up, CM without a PVA implant may provide equivalent or better relief compared with a PVACM procedure, while avoiding potential risks associated with the implant.
     
    To view the article click here.

    • 14 min
    FAI August 2020: Patient Characteristics of Possible Responders and Nonresponders to Total Ankle Arthroplasty

    FAI August 2020: Patient Characteristics of Possible Responders and Nonresponders to Total Ankle Arthroplasty

    Characteristics of responders, or those who achieve a clinical improvement above the level of a minimal clinically important difference, have not been defined for total ankle arthroplasty (TAA). The purpose of this study was to determine patient characteristics that distinguish possible responders from possible nonresponders after TAA using criteria established for other arthroplasty surgeries.
    In conclusion, our data reveal that a higher baseline SF-36 MCS score was associated with increased improvement in SMFA function scores, while rheumatic disease was associated with worse improvement in SMFA function scores after TAA. Patients with rheumatic disease or poor mental health may not achieve as favorable results after TAA and should be counseled appropriately.
     
    To view the article click here.

    • 10 min
    FAI July 2020: Comparison of 5-Year Patient-Reported Outcomes (PROMs) of Total Ankle Replacement (TAR) to Total Knee Replacement (TKR) and Total Hip Replacement (THR)

    FAI July 2020: Comparison of 5-Year Patient-Reported Outcomes (PROMs) of Total Ankle Replacement (TAR) to Total Knee Replacement (TKR) and Total Hip Replacement (THR)

    Total ankle replacement (TAR) is becoming a more common alternative to ankle arthrodesis for the improvement of pain and function in end-stage arthritis of the ankle. The effects of end-stage arthritis of the ankle are similar to those of end-stage hip arthritis. There is a paucity of literature on patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) following TARs in comparison with total hip replacement (THR) or total knee replacement (TKR). We aimed to study the 1-, 3-, and 5-year outcomes of TAR in comparison with TKR and THR.
    TAR patients had similar outcomes to THR and TKR patients for disease-specific and mental health domains, and lower patient satisfaction rates in terms of pain relief, ADL, and recreation. Further research is warranted including clinical outcomes along with PROMs with a long-term follow-up.
     
    To view the article click here.

    • 10 min
    FAI June 2020: Effect of Microfracture on Functional Outcomes and Subchondral Sclerosis Following Distraction Arthroplasty of the Ankle Joint

    FAI June 2020: Effect of Microfracture on Functional Outcomes and Subchondral Sclerosis Following Distraction Arthroplasty of the Ankle Joint

    Treatment for post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA) of the ankle remains challenging. Distraction arthroplasty (DA) is an alternative for patients who are averse to or poor candidates for arthrodesis or joint replacement. The purpose of this study was to examine the role of microfracture (MFX) and concentrated bone marrow aspirate (CBMA) on the outcome of patients undergoing DA for end-stage PTOA of the ankle joint.
    The current study showed no benefit from MFX when combined with DA in the treatment of PTOA. CBMA may have helped mitigate the adverse effect of MFX but conferred no benefit when used with DA alone. DA remains a useful alternative to ankle arthrodesis and arthroplasty in patients with PTOA. However, MFX and biologic augmentation using CBMA appeared to have no additional benefit.
     
    To view the article click here.

    • 14 min
    FAI May 2020: Mobility Limitation After Surgery for Degenerative Pathology of the Ankle, Hindfoot, and Midfoot vs Total Hip Arthroplasty

    FAI May 2020: Mobility Limitation After Surgery for Degenerative Pathology of the Ankle, Hindfoot, and Midfoot vs Total Hip Arthroplasty

    Surgery for degenerative foot and ankle conditions often results in a lengthy recovery. Current outcome measures do not accurately assess postoperative mobility, especially in older patients. The Life-Space Assessment (LSA), a questionnaire quantifying patients’ mobility after a medical event, was used in this study to assess perioperative mobility in total hip arthroplasty (THA) and foot and ankle surgery patients. We hypothesized that patients undergoing elective foot and ankle surgery would have greater postoperative mobility limitation than THA patients.
    Compared with THA, recovery of mobility after foot and ankle surgery was slower. THA patients exhibited improved mobility as early as 3 months after surgery, whereas foot and ankle patients did not show full improvement until 12 months. This work will assist the foot and ankle specialist in educating patients about challenges in mobility during their recovery from surgery.
     
    To view the article click here.

    • 11 min

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