113 épisodes

The Center for International Development (CID) at Harvard University is a university-wide center that works to advance the understanding of development challenges and offer viable solutions to problems of global poverty.

CID is Harvard’s leading research hub focusing on resolving the dilemmas of public policy associated with generating stable, shared, and sustainable prosperity in developing countries. Our ongoing mission is to apply knowledge to and revolutionize the world of development practice.
WWW.CID.HARVARD.EDU

Harvard Center for International Development Harvard University

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The Center for International Development (CID) at Harvard University is a university-wide center that works to advance the understanding of development challenges and offer viable solutions to problems of global poverty.

CID is Harvard’s leading research hub focusing on resolving the dilemmas of public policy associated with generating stable, shared, and sustainable prosperity in developing countries. Our ongoing mission is to apply knowledge to and revolutionize the world of development practice.
WWW.CID.HARVARD.EDU

    Emerging Evidence On The Socio-Economic Impacts Of COVID-19 On Households

    Emerging Evidence On The Socio-Economic Impacts Of COVID-19 On Households

    Originally recorded on December 4, 2020.

    Carolina Sanchez-Paramo, Global Director of Poverty & Equity Global Practice at the World Bank, continues her discussion after a virtual CID Speaker Series event on the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic and the associated economic crisis on households, which are significant, pervasive, and worsening in some cases. The design and implementation of an effective policy response requires that decision makers have access to timely information about who is affected and how. With COVID-19 having brought traditional data collection efforts to a halt, last spring the World Bank launched an unprecedented data collection effort aimed at filling this critical information gap. As part of this effort, phone surveys are currently under implementation or preparation in over 100 countries to obtain real-time information on the socioeconomic impacts of the pandemic on households and individuals.

    Carolina Sanchez is the Global Director of Poverty & Equity Global Practice at the World Bank. In her talk, she drew from from this data and other analysis to present the latest evidence on the poverty and distributional impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic and the associated economic crisis.

    • 19 min
    Smart Containment with Active Learning: Proposal for a Data-Responsive & Graded Approach to COVID-19

    Smart Containment with Active Learning: Proposal for a Data-Responsive & Graded Approach to COVID-19

    Originally recorded on November 13th, 2020.

    CID Director Asim I. Khwaja joined us after CID's virtual Speaker Series event for further discussion on his research proposal for governments to face the challenges of COVID-19 faster and better, using the Smart Containment with Active Learning (SCALE) strategy. SCALE is an active learning strategy that tests and refines policy in real-time through a context-specific approach, according to the local prevalence of COVID-19.

    In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, governments face a difficult tradeoff, particularly in developing countries. Government officials must decide either to keep their economies open and risk thousands of lives or implement a lockdown and risk economic collapse, which may also result in many non-COVID related deaths. Even worse they must make these decisions without knowing what the real tradeoff between them is.

    Lockdowns hit low-income countries especially hard. Larger informal workforces mean newly vulnerable populations are harder to target for support. Chains of food production and distribution are more fragile. With many people living on the margins of starvation, a higher prevalence of disease, and poor healthcare, non COVID related morbidity risks are high. The government also has limited money and public capacity to rely upon.

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    To learn more about SCALE, please visit CID's website: https://www.hks.harvard.edu/centers/cid/publications/smart-containment-with-active-learning

    • 19 min
    The Millions Learning Project: Scaling Quality Education to Children & Youth

    The Millions Learning Project: Scaling Quality Education to Children & Youth

    Originally recorded on November 20, 2020

    Jenny Perlman Robinson and Molly Curtiss joined us at CID's virtual Speaker Series event and sat down with us for further discussion on their work on scaling and education at the Center for Universal Education(CUE), Brookings Institution.

    Despite growing evidence on what works to improve access and quality in education, the world continues to face a global learning crisis, with 258 million children already out of school and 617 million children and adolescents in school but not learning the basics even before the COVID-19 pandemic shut down schools around the globe. While there are many initiatives working to address this challenge at a small-scale, they often do not translate into the large-scale, systemic change required. Since 2014, the Millions Learning project, led by the Center for Universal Education (CUE) at the Brookings Institution, has examined how and under what conditions education policies and programs have gone to scale in developing contexts. Drawing upon literature and case studies from around the world, the 2016 report, Millions Learning: Scaling up quality education in developing countries, identified 14 core ingredients that, in different combinations depending on the context, contribute to scaling effective practices and approaches that improve learning. Now in the second phase of the project, CUE is implementing Real-time Scaling Labs, an action research project undertaken in partnership with local institutions and governments in several countries to support, learn from, and document the scaling process in real-time. The ultimate goal of these labs is to support initiatives as they deepen and expand while simultaneously gaining deeper insight into how policymakers, civil society, and the private sector can most effectively work together to bring about large-scale transformation in the quality of children’s learning and their development. This presentation will share key insights and lessons learned from the Millions Learning project to date, including the key drivers of scaling impact in education and common scaling barriers, alongside illustrative examples from the Real-time Scaling Labs currently underway.



    Jenny Perlman Robinson is senior fellow at the Center for Universal Education (CUE) at the Brookings Institution where she leads CUE’s efforts to build the evidence and produce practical guidance for scaling effective education initiatives through the Millions Learning project. Molly Curtiss is a senior research analyst at the Brookings Institution Center for Universal Education (CUE), where she has worked on the Millions Learning project since 2017.

    • 24 min
    Catalyzing Global Leadership to Contain the Impact of COVID-19

    Catalyzing Global Leadership to Contain the Impact of COVID-19

    At this week's virtual CID Speaker Series event, Catalyzing Global Leadership to Contain the Impact of COVID-19 we are joined by featured guest Peter Sands, Executive Director of The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria after his appearance at the virtual JKF Jr. Forum on October 28, 2020.

    How do we galvanize a global response to COVID-19 that truly leaves no-one behind? So far OECD countries have mobilized over $10 trillion for their own domestic responses, but foreign aid to low and middle countries remains broadly flat. Will we succeed in making everyone safe from COVID-19, or will we replicate what we did with HIV and tuberculosis, the two most recent big pandemics affecting humanity, which are largely eliminated as a public health threat in rich countries, but still kill millions in poor, vulnerable and marginalized communities?

    • 13 min
    Bringing Credibility, Discipline & Transparency to Impact Investing

    Bringing Credibility, Discipline & Transparency to Impact Investing

    At this week's virtual CID Speaker Series event we are joined by Neil Gregory, Chief Thought Leadership Officer of the International Finance Corporation or the private investment arm of the World Bank Group for a discussion moderated by Shawn Cole, a professor in the Finance Unit at Harvard Business School, where he teaches and conducts research on financial services, social enterprise, and impact investing.

    // Recorded virtually October 23, 2020.

    Impact investing in private markets could be as large as $2.1 trillion in assets under management, but only a quarter of that, $505 billion, is clearly measured for its impact, both for development impact and financial returns, according to the report Growing Impact—New Insights into the Practice of Impact Investing.

    Impact investing can be defined as “investments made into companies or organizations with the intent to contribute to measurable positive social or environmental impact, alongside financial returns.” This week's speaker is Neil Gregory, Chief Thought Leadership Officer of the International Finance Corporation, the private investment arm of the World Bank Group. The conversation moderator is Shawn Cole, a professor in the Finance Unit at Harvard Business School, where he teaches and conducts research on financial services, social enterprise, and impact investing.

    Neil is going to speak on The Operating Principles for Impact Management, launched in April 2019 to provide a framework for investors to ensure that impact considerations are purposefully integrated throughout the investment life cycle. The Impact Principles bring greater discipline and transparency to the impact investing market, requiring annual disclosure statements and independent verification of Signatories' impact management systems and processes. As the number of Signatories continues to grow, these asset managers, asset owners, Multilateral Development Banks and Development Finance Institutions have become a collaborative community, working together to shape the future of impact investing.

    Neil Gregory is Chief Thought Leadership Officer of the International Finance Corporation, the private investment arm of the World Bank Group. He has held a range of senior strategy and management roles at IFC, including research, business planning, investment and advisory functions. He was previously Adviser to the UK Executive Director of the World Bank and International Monetary Fund, and an Economic Adviser to the UK Government. He has extensive work experience in South Asia, China, Africa and the Caribbean. A British national, Neil has MA and MSc degrees in Economics from Cambridge and Oxford and an MBA from Georgetown.

    • 11 min
    A Temporary Basic Income for Developing Countries

    A Temporary Basic Income for Developing Countries

    On this week's Speaker Series virtual event, we were joined by George Gray Molina, Chief Economist at UN Development Programme's Global Policy Bureau. COVID-19 and the response to the pandemic is driving millions of informal sector and self-employed workers into poverty. George Gray Molina discussed the findings of a recent UNDP brief that provides estimates of a temporary basic income for all poor and vulnerable people in the developing world.

    // Recorded virtually on October 9, 2020.

    Speaker:
    ​George Gray Molina, Chief Economist at UNDP's Global Policy Bureau

    About the speaker:
    George Gray Molina is Chief Economist at UN Development Programme's Global Policy Bureau. His policy and research work focuses on poverty, inequality and policy reforms in the developing world. He has over twenty years of work experience in government, the United Nations, and academia. In his home country, Bolivia, he was head of UDAPE, the Ministry of the Presidency's economic think tank and professor of public policy at the Catholic University of Bolivia. He has also worked as Chief Economist at UNDP's Latin American and Caribbean bureau and has taught public policy at Columbia's SIPA MPA program. He holds a BA in Economics and Anthropology at Cornell University, an MPP at Harvard's Kennedy School of Government, a Dphil in Politics at Nuffield College, Oxford University and has conducted post-doc research on global economic governance at Princeton and Oxford.

    • 15 min

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