140 épisodes

The Let’s Go To Court podcast brings together two of the greatest legal minds of our time. Just kidding.

We’re your hosts Brandi Egan and Kristin Caruso. What we lack in legal training we more than make up for in being completely obsessed with lawsuits. Every week, we discuss two juicy legal battles. Each episode is peppered with Brandi’s booming laugh and Kristin’s Olympic-level talent for putting the word “so” into every sentence.

The podcast started in 2018, but we’ve been having these conversations for years. What can we say? We’re just a couple of lifelong friends who love the drama of a trial. Our other interests include: liquid eyeliner, Fresca, and begging Noodles and Company to bring back the spicy chicken caesar wrap.

Let's Go To Court! Let's Go To Court!

    • Criminologie

The Let’s Go To Court podcast brings together two of the greatest legal minds of our time. Just kidding.

We’re your hosts Brandi Egan and Kristin Caruso. What we lack in legal training we more than make up for in being completely obsessed with lawsuits. Every week, we discuss two juicy legal battles. Each episode is peppered with Brandi’s booming laugh and Kristin’s Olympic-level talent for putting the word “so” into every sentence.

The podcast started in 2018, but we’ve been having these conversations for years. What can we say? We’re just a couple of lifelong friends who love the drama of a trial. Our other interests include: liquid eyeliner, Fresca, and begging Noodles and Company to bring back the spicy chicken caesar wrap.

    High Schoolers

    High Schoolers

    As the Civil War came to an end, Alexander Clark saw possibilities. He’d helped dismantle slavery, and now he wanted a piece of the next big fight -- the fight for equality. So he and other black men lobbied Iowa for voting rights. When they won that fight, Clark turned his attention to education. His home sat next door to Grammar School No. 2. It was a good public school. But his children couldn’t attend it. Instead, they had to go to a poorly funded school about a mile away. So when his daughter Susan was 12 years old, Alexander and his wife Catherine sent her to Grammar School No. 2. When she was turned away, they sued.

    Then Brandi tells us about 17-year-old Ashley Reeves. Ashley had always been a dependable kid, so when she broke curfew one April night in 2006, her mom immediately knew that something was wrong. Initially, police suspected Ashley’s boyfriend. But when that lead didn’t go anywhere, they turned their focus on a 27-year-old physical education teacher named Samson Shelton.

    And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

    In this episode, Kristin pulled from:

    The documentary “Lost in History: Alexander Clark” by Iowa PBS

    “Clark v. Board of School Directors: Reflections After 150 Years,” by Drake School of Law

    “Alexander Clark,” entry on Wikipedia

    “Muscatine, Iowa,” entry on Wikipedia

    “Clark v. Board of School Directors,” entry on Wikipedia

    In this episode, Brandi pulled from:

    “Deadly Lessons” episode On the Case with Paula Zahn

    “Midwestern Teen Left For Dead In Woods” episode Crime Watch Daily

    “Did Teacher Strangle Teen, Go Dancing?” by Christine Lagorio, CBS News

    “Mother: Ashley Reeves Neck Not Broken” by Beth Hundsdorfer, The Belleville News-Democrat

    “‘Miracle’ Girls Sees Attacker Sentenced” Associated Press, The Oklahoman

    • 2 h 10 min
    A Facebook Stalker & a Foreclosure

    A Facebook Stalker & a Foreclosure

    It all started with a friend request. Amanda Playle was flattered to see the Facebook request come in from her old high school boyfriend, Anthony Reynolds. The two hadn’t spoken for a while, but they quickly reconnected. They talked about their lives. So much had changed since their high school days. Amanda was married to her husband Paul. She’d become a mother. Over time, she admitted to Anthony that her marriage wasn’t perfect. But when Anthony pressed her to meet up, she declined. She didn’t want to cross a line. But Anthony refused to take no for an answer. Soon, he began stalking and harassing her.

    Then Kristin tells us about a man who fell behind on his mortgage payments. Tony Kiritsis planned to turn his real estate into a shopping center, but after falling behind on his payments a few too many times, he found himself under the threat of foreclosure. He was livid, but didn’t blame himself. He blamed Meridian Mortgage. So he showed up at their offices one winter morning with a sawed off shotgun and took mortgage broker Dick Hall hostage.

    And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

    In this episode, Kristin pulled from:

    The documentary “Dead Man’s Line”

    Deadmansline.com

    “Tony Kiritsis” entry on Wikipedia

    “Kin testify Kiritsis held sister hostage in 1969,” by Carolyun Colwell for The Courier-Journal

    “Kiritsis jury ‘far from a decision,’” by Kristie Hill for the Associated Press

    In this episode, Brandi pulled from:

    “The Stalker Inside My House” episode BBC Outlook

    “Amanda was terrorised by a stalker for two years. Then she learned her husband was to blame.” by Jessica Clark, mamamia.com

    “Man jailed for stalking wife by impersonating ex-boyfriend” by Damien Gayle, The Guardian

    “Bexhill stalking victim speaks out and urges others to seek help” by Isabelle Cipirska, The Bexhill-On-Sea Observer

    “SLEEPING WITH THE ENEMY Mum-of-three terrorised by stalker for two years horrified to discover it was her own HUSBAND” by Carl Stroud, The Sun

    “'Calculating and cruel' husband, 43, set up fake Facebook accounts to pose as his wife's EX-boyfriend to threaten her and quiz her over past sex life is jailed for more than three years” by Thomas Burrows, The Daily Mail

    • 2 h 2 min
    The Ken and Barbie Killers & the Cocoanut Grove Fire

    The Ken and Barbie Killers & the Cocoanut Grove Fire

    In the early 1940s, Boston’s Cocoanut Grove nightclub was *the* place to see and be seen. The club owner, Barnet “Barney” Welansky, was a sharp businessman. He ensured that the club was beautifully decorated with blue satin hanging from the ceilings, heavy drapes, and support columns that were made to look like palm trees. He also kept a watchful eye on the finances by ensuring that no one left without paying. He locked almost every exit and covered windows with draperies. On November 28, 1942, the Cocoanut Grove gained the horrific distinction of becoming the deadliest nightclub fire in American history.

    Then Brandi brings in her sister, Kaci, to tell us about Paul Bernardo and Karla Homolka, aka, the Ken and Barbie Killers. In the late 80s, the people of Scarborough, Ontario, were on edge. There’d been a string of rapes in their community, and all anyone seemed to know about the rapist was that he was blonde and in his twenties. On little more than hunches, two women called the police to report that they suspected Paul Bernardo as the perpetrator. The women were right, but it’d be years before Paul faced justice. 

    And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

    In this episode, Kristin pulled from:

    The documentary “Six locked doors: the legacy of Cocoanut grove” 

     “The Cocoanut Grove Inferno” by Jack Thomas for the Boston Globe
    “Grove Owner Starts 12-15 Year Sentence,” The Boston Globe

    “Court Upholds Prison Term in Night Club Fire,” Universal Press
    “Night Club Owner Guilty In Boston,” The New York Times

    “The Cocoanut Grove Fire,” BostonFireHistory.org

    In this episode, Kaci pulled from:

    An episode of Autopsy from HBO “Autopsy 8: Dead Giveaway”

    “Paul Bernardo & Karla Homolka” by Marilyn Bardsley, The Crime Library

    “Karla Leanne Homolka,” Murderpedia.org

    “Paul Kenneth Bernardo,” Murderpedia.org

    “Karla Homolka,” Wikipedia.org

    “Paul Bernardo,” Wikipedia.org

    • 2 h 23 min
    A Poisoner & A True Douche Canoe

    A Poisoner & A True Douche Canoe

    Audrey Marie Frazier defies true crime labels. Was she a black widow? Was she a master of disguise? An escape artist? We like to think she was all three! See, ladies? We really can have it all. Audrey was a chronic spender. She never had enough money to support her expensive tastes. So she got creative. She bought life insurance policies, and umm…. All of a sudden, the people around her got sick. Super sick.

    Then Kristin tells us about John Darwin. This man is a douche canoe if we’ve ever heard of one. On March 21, 2002, John hopped in his handmade canoe and set out into the North Sea. The waters were calm and he was an experienced canoeist, but John didn’t show up for work that evening. His wife, Anne, panicked. She called the authorities. Rescue crews worked tirelessly to find John, but all they found was his paddle and the wreckage of his canoe. Don’t worry about John, though. He was just fine.

    And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

    Oh good, you're still reading! Would you like to get your hands on a Bed Bath & Beyond bag filled with our first round of merch? And would you like to get that merch by donating to a worthy cause? You're in luck!

    We've donated two t-shirts, a package of stickers, a shout-out on an upcoming episode and a personalized video to Harmony Project KC's silent auction. If you're able, please bid on it! DO IT FOR THE KIDS!  https://casbid.com/NECC

    In this episode, Kristin pulled from:

    An episode of the podcast Redhanded, “How Not To Fake Your Death: John Darwin - Canoe Man”

    “‘Canoe man’ John Darwin who faked his own death has extraordinary new life,” by Emily Retter for The Mirror

    “Canoe pair lose jail term appeals,” BBC News

    “Canoe man’s ‘lover’: Darwin the Druid is psychotic - and I was terrified of him,” the London Evening Standard

    “Canoeist sons ‘put through hell,” BBC News

    “Sea search for missing canoeist,” BBC News

    “Missing canoeist admits deception,” BBC News

    “Anne Darwin’s week in court: ‘A woman able to lie and deceive at length,” by David Randall for the Independent

    “John Darwin disappearance case” entry on Wikipedia

    “Canoe man and wife jailed for six years,” by Tom Wilkinson for The Independent

    In this episode, Brandi pulled from:

    “Marie Hilley: Inscrutable Black Widow” by Marlee MacLeod, The Crime Library

    “The Great Escape Artist” by Mark Gribben, The Malefactors Register

    “Alabama Woman Who Poisoned Her Husband And Daughter Dies After Escaping Prison” by Benjamin H. Smith,http://oxygen.com

    • 2 h 19 min
    The Great Molasses Flood & a Father's Love

    The Great Molasses Flood & a Father's Love

    It was the winter of 1919, and the folks at the Purity Distilling Company were working their asses off. Prohibition was right around the corner, and they wanted to make as much rum as they could -- while it was still legal. They received shipment after shipment of a key ingredient: Molasses. All of it went in a tank in Boston’s North End. The tank was 50 feet tall and 90 feet in diameter. It held up to 2.3 million gallons of molasses. But the tank had problems. It leaked constantly, and it made strange groaning sounds. It had been poorly constructed. On January 15, 1919, the tank collapsed.

    Then Brandi tells us about pedofile Jeff Doucet. Jeff ran a karate studio in the 80s, and that’s how he gained the trust of 11 year old Jody Plauche. Over time, Jeff groomed Jody. For a year, he sexually abused the boy. Then, in February of 1984, he kidnapped Jody. Investigators tracked Jeff down to a motel in California, and returned Jody to his parents. Jody’s parents were devastated to hear what had happened to their son. And Jody’s father Gary decided to get revenge.

    And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

    In this episode, Kristin pulled from:

    The book, “Dark Tide: The Great Boston Molasses Flood of 1919” by Stephen Puleo

    “The Great Molasses Flood,” by Robert Stanly for New England Today

    “Why the Great Molasses Flood Was So Deadly” by Emily Sohn for history.com

    “Great Molasses Flood” entry on Britannica

    “Great Molasses Flood” entry on Wikipedia

    In this episode, Brandi pulled from:

    “Survivors Perspective with Jody Plauché” episode, Criminal Perspective podcast

    “Molested, abducted as a child in infamous Baton Rouge case, Jody Plauché wants his story to help others” by George Morris, The Advocate

    “A Father’s Justice” by Rick Reilly, ESPN

    “Man Who Shot Son’s Alleged Kidnapper Pleads Innocent” by Guy Coates, AP

    “Plauche Pleads No Contest To Manslaughter Charges” by Ray Formaker Jr., AP

    “Father Who Killed Alleged Abuser on TV Avoids Jail” Los Angeles Times

    “Gary Plauché” wikipedia.org

    • 1h 58 min
    Love Stories

    Love Stories

    This week, we covered two romantic entanglements that’ll have you reaching for the puke bucket.

    Burt Pugach was a wealthy, married lawyer when he met 21-year-old Linda Riss on a park bench in New York City. Linda wasn’t particularly attracted to Burt, but he was pushy. They’d been dating a while when Linda discovered that Burt was married. Burt had a million excuses, but Linda didn’t buy any of them. She decided to move on with her life. But Burt made that impossible.

    Then Kristin tells us a truly revolting catfishing tale. In 2005, Thomas Montgomery was living the life of a married suburban dad. But Tom was unfulfilled. So he got online. He quickly fell into conversation with an 18-year-old high school student who went by the screenname Talhotblond. She sent him pictures of herself. She was gorgeous, and she wanted to see pictures of him. What was a balding, 40-something man to do? Lie his ass off. 

    And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

    In this episode, Kristin pulled from:

    The documentary “Talhotblond”

    And several unsuccessful google searches

    In this episode, Brandi pulled from:

    “Crazy Love” Documentary

    “It’s Me and Burt Against The World” by Paul Schwartzman, The Washington Post

    “Meet the Pugachs” by Marianne Macdonald, The Guardian

    “Linda Riss Pugach, Whose Life Was Ripped From Headlines, Dies at 75” by Margalit Fox, The New York Times

    • 2 h 38 min

D’autres se sont aussi abonnés à