111 épisodes

Maghrib in Past & Present | Podcasts is a forum in which artists, writers, and scholars from North Africa, the United States, and beyond can present their ongoing and innovative research on and cultural activities in the Maghrib. The podcasts are are based on lectures or performances before live audiences across the Maghrib. Aiming to project the scientific and cultural dynamism of research in and on North Africa into the classroom, we too hope to reach a wider audience across the globe.

Maghrib in Past & Present | Podcast‪s‬ themaghribpodcast.com

    • Éducation
    • 5.0 • 1 note

Maghrib in Past & Present | Podcasts is a forum in which artists, writers, and scholars from North Africa, the United States, and beyond can present their ongoing and innovative research on and cultural activities in the Maghrib. The podcasts are are based on lectures or performances before live audiences across the Maghrib. Aiming to project the scientific and cultural dynamism of research in and on North Africa into the classroom, we too hope to reach a wider audience across the globe.

    Non-State Actors and State-Building in Libya after 2011

    Non-State Actors and State-Building in Libya after 2011

    In this podcast, Professor Amal El-Obeidi discusses power struggles in Libya, as well as the country's instability since 2011. In the absence of a central state after the fall of Qaddafi's regime, processes of national reconciliation and transitional justice have been ineffective. Additionally, the increased number of municipalities after 2014 has led to new political divisions. El-Obeidi argues that local-level governing coalitions have often filled the void of state sovereignty and worked to reduce marginalization, as well as ensure equal access to resources. She focuses specifically on the increasing role of non-state actors in national reconciliation. In this context, tribes played a significant role in Libya's political and social life through ‘urf, or customary law. El-Obeidi highlights the position of women in local reconciliation dialogs within male-dominated councils. In addition to her research, El-Obeidi also speaks of the ways in which academic life has changed significantly for Libya scholars since 2011. The conflict in Libya has not only impacted academic facilities, but has made field research difficult, if not impossible. 
     
    Amal El-Obeidi is Professor of Comparative Politics in the Department of Political Science at the University of Benghazi, Libya. Currently she is a fellow researcher at the Institute for African Studies at Bayreuth University, Germany. She is a founding member and vice president of the Libyan Experts Forum for Development since 2017. Author of Political Culture in Libya, her work has appeared in Open Democracy and Middle East Monitor. Prof. El-Obeidi's research interests include gender issue, local reconciliation, governance and security issues, migration, conflict resolution, and peace building. Her current research addresses tribalism in Libya from a gender perspective. 
     
    Jacob Mundy, Associate Professor of Peace and Conflict Studies at Colgate University, conducted this interview on November 23, 2020. This podcast is part of the "Supporting Critical Research and Strengthening Scholarly Capacity in Algeria, Libya, and Tunisia" project organized by the Centre d'Études Maghrébines à Tunis (CEMAT) and the Centre d'Études Maghrébines en Algérie (CEMA), and funded by the Carnegie Corporation of New York. Prof. Mundy heads the contemporary Libya studies research unit, of which Prof. El-Obeidi is a member.

    Posted by: Hayet Lansari, Librarian, Outreach Coordinator, Content Curator (CEMA).

    • 28 min
    Centralization and Decentralization in the Middle East and North Africa

    Centralization and Decentralization in the Middle East and North Africa

    In this podcast on local governance in Morocco and Jordan, Dr. Janine A. Clark, Professor of Political Science at the University of Toronto, examines how decentralization and centralization mechanisms are implemented at the municipal level. She asks why Morocco decentralized while Jordan did not. Relying on the history of electoral politics and municipal laws in both countries, her research covers the periods from Morocco's independence until 2015, and from 1995 to 2015 in Jordan. Her work specifically considers the 2009 municipal elections in Morocco, and the 2007 municipal elections in Jordan. Clark argues that decentralization processes are determined by governments' coalition strategies since regimes tend to build alliances with certain social groups that keep them in power through elite capture. This, decentralization offers numerous opportunities for local elites to pursue their interests. Clark too shows how decentralization stabilizes authoritarian regimes while centralization can have destabilizing effects.

    Janina A. Clark. is author of Local Politics in Jordan and Morocco (Columbia University Press, 2018), Islam, Charity, and Activism: Middle-Class Networks and Social Welfare in Egypt, Jordan, and Yemen (Indiana University Press, 2004) and co-editor of Economic Liberalization, Democratization and Civil Society in the Developing World (Palgrave, 2000), and of numerous single and co-authored articles. She is editor-in-chief of Middle East Law and Governance (MELG).

    This episode is part of the Society & Politics in the Maghrib series and was recorded on January 13th, 2020 at the Centre d'Études Maghrébines à Tunis (CEMAT).

    Posted by: Hayet Lansari, Librarian, Outreach Coordinator, Content Curator (CEMA).

    • 43 min
    Bread and Circuits: Illness, Food, and the Course of Empire in Algeria

    Bread and Circuits: Illness, Food, and the Course of Empire in Algeria

    In the midst of ongoing drought, famine, and epidemic disease in the 1860s, a few settlers in Algiers got sick with a mysterious illness. Investigations determined that the culprit was construction debris from the Haussmannization of Paris, shipped across imperial channels and then used as fuel in a few Algiers bakeries. Lead pain become poison in loaves as this material combusted in colonial bread ovens. The modernization of the imperial metropole, that is, turned into toxic debris in the colony. In this podcast, Dr. Brock Cutler takes a look at how this story about poisoned bread can expose the filaments that tied together an imperial space in the western Mediterranean, along the way illuminating the role bread played in performances of modern imperialism.

    Dr. Brock Cutler is an Associate Professor in the Department of History at Radford University. He is the author of numerous articles and book chapters dealing with ecology and history in North Africa. His forthcoming book, "Crisis Ecologies: Imperialism, Death, and Debris in Algeria," centered around a massive ecological disaster in which 800,000 Algerians died between 1865 and 1872, explores how the new eco-social dynamics in the late nineteenth century cleaved societies from environments and people from society, creating the new insides and outsides of modernity and imperialism.

    This episode is part of “Health and Humanities in the Maghrib” a lecture series by the American Institute for Maghrib Studies (AIMS), organized by the Centre d'Études Maghrébines à Tunis (CEMAT) and the Centre d'Études Maghrébines en Algérie (CEMA), in close collaboration with the Tangier American Legation Institute for Moroccan Studies (TALIM). It was recorded on the 15th of October 2020 between Oran, Radford (VA), St. Petersburg (FL) and Tunis. Dr. Adam Guerin, Associate Professor in the Department of History at Eckerd College, moderated the lecture and debate.

    To see related slides visit our web site www.themaghribpodcast.com

    Realization and editing:  Hayet Lansari, Librarian, Outreach Coordinator, Content Curator (CEMA).

    • 50 min
    Anti-Elitism in Tunisia: Condition of Political Success?

    Anti-Elitism in Tunisia: Condition of Political Success?

    In this podcast, Associate Professor Tarek Kahlaoui reflects on populism in the post-revolutionary context of Tunisia. Kahlaoui questions the idea of an umbrella definition of Tunisian populism, a misleading term that overlooks important nuances. He asks whether populism is a real threat to representative democracy. He compares the two distinctive frontrunners of the 2019 presidential elections, Kais Saied and Nabil Karoui.

    Associate Prof. Kahlaoui taught history and Islamic civilization at Rutgers University for a decade after completing his Ph.D. at the University of Pennsylvania in 2008. After serving as the general director of the Tunisian Institute of Strategic Studies, Tunisia's leading think tank tied to the Presidency of the Republic, he resumed teaching history of the Arab World at the South Mediterranean University in Tunis. He is author of a 2020 book on Ahmed Ben Salah, a powerful super-minister under Tunisia's first president, Habib Bourguiba.

    This podcast, in CEMAT's Politics Now lecture series, was recorded as part of the roundtable on "Populism, Politics and Popularity - Reflections on the Politics of Today," organized by the Centre d'Études Maghrébines à Tunis (CEMAT) on February 6, 2020, at Le 15 in downtown Tunis.

    Posted by: Hayet Lansari, Librarian, Outreach Coordinator, Content Curator (CEMA).

    • 20 min
    الشعبوية: قراءة حول المثال التونسي

    الشعبوية: قراءة حول المثال التونسي

    في هذا التسجيل الصوتي، يناقش الأستاذ محمد شفيق صرصار آثار الخطاب الشعبوي الذي عرفه المشهد السياسي التونسي منذ 2011 على نتائج الانتخابات المتعاقبة في البلاد، كما يربط هذه الظاهرة ببروز الشخصيات السياسية الشعبوية في الإنتخابات الرئاسية والتشريعية ل 2019. ويأتي الأستاذ صرصار على العوامل التي أعدت المناخ السياسي التونسي لصعود الخطابات الشعبوية مؤكدا على أن تظافر أزمة الأحزاب السياسية والمؤسسات الديمقراطية بتعمق الإشكاليات الاجتماعية والاقتصادية، قد عبّد الطّريق لظهور اوليغارشية سياسية جديدة سيطرت على مسار البناء السياسي والديمقراطي في تونس منذ 2011. ويعتبر الأستاذ أن المناخ السياسي المتسم بفشل السياسيين في تحقيق المطالب الاجتماعية والاقتصادية للثورة وإيغالهم في الانعزال عن المشاغل الشعبية يفسر إلى حد كبير شعبية الشخصيات السياسية التي تتماهى وفكرة "الشعب" محاولة تقمص مشاعره ومطالبه عبر الخطاب والممارسة الشعبوية.

    محمد شفيق صرصار هو أستاذ القانون العام بكلية الحقوق والعلوم السياسية بتونس- جامعة تونس المنار والرئيس السابق للهيئة العليا المستقلة للانتخابات (2014-2017). وقد تولى الأستاذ صرصار، غداة الثورة التونسية في 2011 عضوية لجنة الخبراء بالهيئة العليا المستقلة لتحقيق أهداف الثورة والإصلاح السياسي والانتقال الديمقراطي.

    تم تسجيل هذه الحلقة من المحاضرات عن "السياسة اليوم" في إطار الندوة التي نظمها مركز الدراسات المغاربية بتونس بتاريخ 6 فيفري 2020 حول "الشعبوية، السياسة والشعبية: تأملات حول سياسات اليوم" بفضاء "Le Quinze " بتونس.

    Posted by: Hayet Lansari, Librarian, Outreach Coordinator, Content Curator (CEMA).

    • 14 min
    Populism and the Crisis of the Republic

    Populism and the Crisis of the Republic

    In this podcast, Professor Charles Tripp argues that populism is a form of collective politics that embodies distinct ideas, particularly those about popular sovereignty. Populism, he stresses, claims to communicate and respond directly to the political base – the people – by passing increasingly unpopular political elites and institutions. Three features characterize populism: (1) demagogic simplification; (2) anti-representative confrontation of below and above; and (3) assertion of a clear and uniform will of the people. The rise of populism is a symptom of a crisis of governance and particularly a crisis of the republic, which fails to fulfill its promises of citizen equality. From this perspective, populism becomes a technique for disguising deep inequalities of power.

    Charles Tripp is Professor Emeritus of Politics with reference to the Middle East and North Africa at the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), University of London, and is a Fellow of the British Academy. His PhD was from SOAS and examined Egyptian politics in the latter years of monarchy. At SOAS he had been head of the Centre for Middle Eastern Studies and is one of the co-founders of the Centre for Comparative Political Thought. His research has mainly focused on political developments in the Middle East and includes the nature of autocracy, war and the state, as well as Islamic political thought, the politics of resistance and the relationship between art and power. He is currently working on a study of the emergence of the public and the rethinking of republican ideals in North Africa.

    This podcast, in CEMAT's Politics Now lecture series, was recorded as part of the roundtable on "Populism, Politics and Popularity - Reflections on the Politics of Today," organized by the Centre d'Études Maghrébines à Tunis (CEMAT) on February 6, 2020, at Le 15 in downtown Tunis.

    Posted by: Hayet Lansari, Librarian, Outreach Coordinator, Content Curator (CEMA).

    • 17 min

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