40 épisodes

This podcast is written and produced by psychiatry residents at the University of Toronto and is aimed at medical students and residents. Listeners will learn about fundamental and more advanced topics in psychiatry as our resident team explore these topics with world-class psychiatrists at U of T and abroad.

PsychEd: educational psychiatry podcast PsychEd

    • Forme et santé

This podcast is written and produced by psychiatry residents at the University of Toronto and is aimed at medical students and residents. Listeners will learn about fundamental and more advanced topics in psychiatry as our resident team explore these topics with world-class psychiatrists at U of T and abroad.

    PsychEd Episode 38: Clinical High Risk for Psychosis with Dr. Thomas Raedler

    PsychEd Episode 38: Clinical High Risk for Psychosis with Dr. Thomas Raedler

    Welcome to PsychEd, the psychiatry podcast for medical learners, by medical learners. This episode covers Clinical High Risk for Psychosis with Dr. Thomas Raedler, Psychiatrist and associate professor at the University of Calgary and one of the authors of the Canadian Treatment Guidelines for Individuals at Clinical High Risk of Psychosis.
     
    The learning objectives for this episode are as follows:
    By the end of this episode, you should be able to…
     
    Recognize a patient who may be clinically high-risk for psychosis and provide a differential diagnosis 
    Understand the importance, utility and prognosis of these risk categories 
    Have an approach to initial management and the array of treatment options for a patient with 
     
    Hosts: Dr. Luke Fraccaro (PGY-2), Dr. Rebecca Marsh (PGY-1), Dr. Alex Raben
    Episode lead: Dr. Luke Fraccaro
    Audio-engineered by: Dr. Rebecca Marsh
    Guest experts: Dr. Thomas Raedler
    Show Notes by: Dr. Luke Fraccaro
     
    Resources:
     
    Addington, J., Francey, S., Morrison, A.  (2006). Working with People at High Risk of Developing Psychosis: A Treatment Handbook 
    McGlashan, T., Walsh, B., & Woods, S. (2010). The psychosis-risk syndrome: handbook for diagnosis and follow-up. Oxford University Press.
     
    References :
    Addington, J., Addington, D., Abidi, S., Raedler, T., & Remington, G. (2017). Canadian treatment guidelines for individuals at clinical high risk of psychosis. The Canadian Journal of Psychiatry, 62(9), 656-661.
    Addington, J., Cornblatt, B. A., Cadenhead, K. S., Cannon, T. D., McGlashan, T. H., Perkins, D. O., ... & Heinssen, R. (2011). At clinical high risk for psychosis: outcome for nonconverters. American Journal of Psychiatry, 168(8), 800-805.
    Addington, J., & Heinssen, R. (2012). Prediction and prevention of psychosis in youth at clinical high risk. Annual review of clinical psychology, 8, 269–289. 
    Carrión, R. E., McLaughlin, D., Goldberg, T. E., Auther, A. M., Olsen, R. H., Olvet, D. M., Correll, C. U., & Cornblatt, B. A. (2013). Prediction of functional outcome in individuals at clinical high risk for psychosis. JAMA psychiatry, 70(11), 1133–1142. https://doi.org/10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2013.1909
    Fusar-Poli, P., Bonoldi, I., Yung, A. R., Borgwardt, S., Kempton, M. J., Valmaggia, L., Barale, F., Caverzasi, E., & McGuire, P. (2012). Predicting psychosis: meta-analysis of transition outcomes in individuals at high clinical risk. Archives of general psychiatry, 69(3), 220–229. 
    Fusar-Poli P, Salazar de Pablo G, Correll CU, et al. Prevention of Psychosis: Advances in Detection, Prognosis, and Intervention. JAMA Psychiatry. 2020;77(7):755–765. doi:10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2019.4779
    Fusar-Poli, P., Schultze-Lutter, F., Cappucciati, M., Rutigliano, G., Bonoldi, I., Stahl, D., Borgwardt, S., Riecher-Rössler, A., Addington, J., Perkins, D. O., Woods, S. W., McGlashan, T., Lee, J., Klosterkötter, J., Yung, A. R., & McGuire, P. (2016). The Dark Side of the Moon: Meta-analytical Impact of Recruitment Strategies on Risk Enrichment in the Clinical High Risk State for Psychosis. Schizophrenia bulletin, 42(3), 732–743. 
    Kuharic, D. B., Kekin, I., Hew, J., Kuzman, M. R., & Puljak, L. (2019). Interventions for prodromal stage of psychosis. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, (11).
    Nelson, B., Amminger, G. P., Bechdolf, A., French, P., Malla, A., Morrison, A. P., ... & Wood, S. J. (2020). Evidence for preventive treatments in young patients at clinical high risk of psychosis: the need for context. The lancet. Psychiatry, 7(5), 378.
    Schmidt, S. J., Schultze-Lutter, F., Schimmelmann, B. G., Maric, N. P., Salokangas, R. K. R., Riecher-Rössler, A., ... & Morrison, A. (2015). EPA guidance on the early intervention in clinical high risk states of psychoses. European psychiatry, 30(3), 388-404.
    Yung, A. R., Yung, A. R., Pan Yuen, H., Mcgorry, P. D., Phillips, L. J., Kelly, D., ... & Buckby, J. (2005). Mapping the onset of psychosis: the comprehensive

    • 52 min
    PsychEd Episode 37: Treating Eating Disorders with Dr. Randy Staab

    PsychEd Episode 37: Treating Eating Disorders with Dr. Randy Staab

    Welcome to PsychEd, the psychiatry podcast for medical learners, by medical learners. This is the second of two episodes covering the topic of eating disorders. In this episode, we explore the treatment of these illnesses with Dr. Randy Staab, a psychiatrist at Trillium Health Partners and medical director of the eating disorders program at Credit Valley Hospital. 
     
    The learning objectives for the episode are as follows:
     
    By the end of this episode, you should be able to…
    Outline the management of eating disorders using a biopsychosocial framework. Identify the indications for various levels of care (inpatient, residential, day hospital, outpatient, etc). Understand the ethical and medicolegal dilemmas (i.e. involuntary treatment) that may arise in treatment of eating disorders. Consider the treatment of special populations (i.e. children and adolescents, older adults, men, LGBTQ+ individuals).  
    Guest: Dr. Randolf “Randy” Staab
     
    Hosts: Dr. Lucy Chen, Dr. Nikhita Singhal (PGY3), Dr. Vanessa Aversa (PGY4)
     
    Audio editing by: Dr. Vanessa Aversa
     
    Show notes by: Dr. Vanessa Aversa, Dr. Nikhita Singhal
     
    Interview Content:
    Introduction - 0:00  Learning objectives - 00:39 Biological approaches to treatment: Nutritional rehabilitation - 03:47 Medications - 06:00 Psychological approaches to treatment -16:35 Treatment of comorbidities - 23:45 Levels of care - 26:00 Ethical dilemmas - 32:40 Special populations: Children and adolescents - 35:35 Older adults - 36:45 Men - 37:55 LGBTQ+ - 40:23 Novel interventions - 42:48 Closing - 51:47  
    Resources:
    The National Eating Disorder Information Centre (NEDIC) provides information, resources, referrals and support to Canadians affected by eating disorders: https://nedic.ca. The National initiative for Eating Disorders (NIED) provides access to educational, informational, and other recovery-oriented resources related to eating disorder prevention and treatment: https://nied.ca. Body Brave provides accessible eating disorder treatment and support, as well as community training and education: https://bodybrave.ca.  
    References:
    American Psychiatric Association. Feeding and eating disorders. In Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders. 5th ed. https://doi.org/10.1176/appi.books.9780890425596.dsm10 Gaudiani J. Sick Enough: A Guide to the Medical Complications of Eating Disorders. New York, NY: Routledge; 2019. Mehler PS, Andersen AE. Eating Disorders: A Guide to Medical Care and Complications. 3rd ed. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press; 2017. American Psychiatric Association. Practice Guideline for the Treatment of Patients with Eating Disorders. 3rd ed. 2006. Geller J, Isserlin L, Seale E, et al. The short treatment allocation tool for eating disorders: current practices in assigning patients to level of care. J Eat Disord. 2018;6(45). https://doi.org/10.1186/s40337-018-0230-2 McClain Z, Peebles R. Body image and eating disorders among lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender youth. Pediatr Clin North Am. 2016 December; 63(6):1079–1090. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2016.07.008 Mangweth-Matzek B, Hoek HW, Rupp CI, Lackner-Seifert K, Frey N, Whitworth AB, Pope HG, Kinzl J. Prevalence of eating disorders in middle-aged women. Int J Eat Disord. 2014 April; 47(3):320–324. https://doi.org/10.1002/eat.22232 Treasure J, Claudino AM, Zucker N. Eating disorders. Lancet. 2010;375(9714):583–593. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(09)61748-7 Smink FR, van Hoeken D, Hoek HW. Epidemiology, course, and outcome of eating disorders. Curr Opin Psychiatry. 2013;26(6):543‐548. https://doi.org/10.1097/yco.0b013e328365a24f  
    CPA Note: The views expressed in this podcast do not necessarily reflect those of the Canadian Psychiatric Association.
     
    For more PsychEd, follow us on Twitter (@psychedpodcast), Facebook (PsychEd Podcast), and Instagram (@psyched.podcast). You can provide feedback by email at psychedpodcast@gmail.com. Fo

    • 52 min
    PsychEd Episode 36: Understanding Eating Disorders with Dr. Randy Staab

    PsychEd Episode 36: Understanding Eating Disorders with Dr. Randy Staab

    Welcome to PsychEd, the psychiatry podcast for medical learners, by medical learners. This is the first of two episodes covering the topic of eating disorders. In this episode, we explore the diagnosis, etiology, and symptomatology of these illnesses with Dr. Randy Staab, a psychiatrist at Trillium Health Partners and medical director of the eating disorders program at Credit Valley Hospital. Dr. Staab joins us again for Part 2, which will focus on eating disorder treatment.
     
    By the end of this episode, you should be able to…
    Recognize the clinical features of the following eating disorders using DSM-5 diagnostic criteria:  Anorexia Nervosa (AN) Bulimia Nervosa (BN) Binge Eating Disorder (BED) Avoidant/Restrictive Food Intake Disorder (ARFID) Other Specified Feeding or Eating Disorder (OSFED) Identify predisposing factors for eating disorders using a biopsychosocial framework. List common comorbid psychiatric conditions associated with eating disorders. Identify and describe the medical complications of eating disorders.  
    Guest: Dr. Randolf “Randy” Staab
     
    Hosts: Dr. Lucy Chen, Dr. Nikhita Singhal (PGY2), Dr. Vanessa Aversa (PGY3)
     
    Audio editing by: Dr. Nikhita Singhal, Dr. Vanessa Aversa
     
    Show notes by: Dr. Vanessa Aversa
     
    Interview Content:
    Introduction - 0:00  Learning objectives - 2:08 DSM-5 definition, clinical features, and associated comorbidities of: Anorexia Nervosa (AN) - 4:27 Bulimia Nervosa (BN) - 12:36 Binge Eating Disorder (BED) - 18:08 Avoidant/Restrictive Food Intake Disorder (ARFID) - 21:43 Other Specified Feeding or Eating Disorder (OSFED) - 26:21 Approach to the initial assessment of a patient with an eating disorder - 29:45 Predisposing factors and explanatory models for the development of eating disorders: Biological factors - 38:10 Psychological factors - 44:00 Sociocultural factors - 48:02 Onset of eating disorders - 49:34 Possible precipitating factors - 51:50 Medical complications of eating disorders: Cardiovascular - 56:13 Endocrine - 58:09 Musculoskeletal - 1:03:20 Gastrointestinal - 1:05:17 Neurological - 1:08:13 Renal - 1:08:59 Dermatological - 1:09:26 Relevant laboratory investigations - 1:11:27 Overview of refeeding syndrome - 1:12:30 Closing - 1:14:27  
    Resources:
    The National Eating Disorder Information Centre (NEDIC) provides information, resources, referrals and support to Canadians affected by eating disorders: https://nedic.ca. The National initiative for Eating Disorders (NIED) provides access to educational, informational, and other recovery-oriented resources related to eating disorder prevention and treatment: https://nied.ca. Body Brave provides accessible eating disorder treatment and support, as well as community training and education: https://bodybrave.ca.  
    References:
    American Psychiatric Association. Feeding and eating disorders. In Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders. 5th ed. https://doi.org/10.1176/appi.books.9780890425596.dsm10 Gaudiani J. Sick Enough: A Guide to the Medical Complications of Eating Disorders. New York, NY: Routledge; 2019. Mehler PS, Andersen AE. Eating Disorders: A Guide to Medical Care and Complications. 3rd ed. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins University Press; 2017. McClain Z, Peebles R. Body image and eating disorders among lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender youth. Pediatr Clin North Am. 2016 December; 63(6):1079–1090. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pcl.2016.07.008 Mangweth-Matzek B, Hoek HW, Rupp CI, Lackner-Seifert K, Frey N, Whitworth AB, Pope HG, Kinzl J. Prevalence of eating disorders in middle-aged women. Int J Eat Disord. 2014 April; 47(3):320–324. https://doi.org/10.1002/eat.22232 Treasure J, Claudino AM, Zucker N. Eating disorders. Lancet. 2010;375(9714):583–593. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(09)61748-7 Smink FR, van Hoeken D, Hoek HW. Epidemiology, course, and outcome of eating disorders. Curr Opin Psychiatry. 2013;26(6):543‐548. https://doi.org/10.1097/

    • 1h 15 min
    PsychEd Episode 35: Pain Psychiatry with Dr. Leon Tourian

    PsychEd Episode 35: Pain Psychiatry with Dr. Leon Tourian

    Welcome to PsychEd, the psychiatry podcast for medical learners, by medical learners.
     
    This episode covers the psychiatric aspects of chronic pain with expert guest:
     
    Dr. Leon Tourian, Associate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at McGill University, and psychiatrist at the MUHC Alan Edwards Pain Management Unit.
     
    The learning objectives for this episode are as follows:
    By the end of this episode, you should be able to
    Explore the role of psychiatry in the management of pain Discuss the epidemiology of psychiatric comorbidities in pain disorders. Outline the pathophysiology of pain and its relationship to psychiatric disorders. Outline the role of non-pharmacological management/treatment of pain including psychotherapy and central neuromodulation Discuss a general psychopharmacology approach in the management of pain relief and psychiatric comorbidities with chronic pain (including SNRI, TCAs, anticonvulsants, antipsychotics and cannabinoids). Discuss the intersection of pain medicine with somatic symptom and related disorders  
    Guest: Dr. Leon Tourian
    Hosts: Dr. Sarah Hanafi (PGY3), Dr. Nima Nahiddi (PGY3), Audrey Le (CC4)
    Audio editing by Audrey Le
    Show notes by Dr. Nima Nahiddi
    Episode Infographic by Dr. Luba Bryushkova
     
     
    Interview Content:
    Introduction and learning objectives – 0:00 Role of psychiatry in management of chronic pain – 1:45 Psychiatric co-morbidities in patients with chronic pain – 5:45 Biological link between pain and psychiatric co-morbidities – 11:00 Psychological approach to understanding and management of chronic pain– 14:30 Central neuromodulation strategies for chronic pain – 21:00 General pharmacological approach to the management of chronic pain – 22:30 Pathogenesis of neuropathic and somatic visceral pain – 30:00 Antipsychotics in the management of chronic pain – 37:00 Cannabis in the management of chronic pain – 40:30 Somatic symptom disorder – 46:00 Stigma in chronic pain disorders – 53:10 Treatment of somatic symptom disorder – 58:30 Psychiatry and the stigma of chronic pain disorders– 61:00 Closing remarks – 65:15  
    Articles and Resources:
    Guideline for opioid therapy and chronic noncancer pain (CMAJ)
    Guideline The 2017 Canadian Guideline for Opioids for Chronic Non-Cancer Pain (McMaster University)
    List of Pain & Opioid Initiatives (2017) (CFPC)
    Canadian Pain Task Force Report: June 2019
     
    References:
    Dersh, J., Polatin, P. B., & Gatchel, R. J. (2002). Chronic pain and psychopathology: research findings and theoretical considerations. Psychosomatic medicine, 64(5), 773–786. https://doi.org/10.1097/01.psy.0000024232.11538.54
     
    Katz, J., Rosenbloom, B. N., & Fashler, S. (2015). Chronic Pain, Psychopathology, and DSM-5 Somatic Symptom Disorder. Canadian journal of psychiatry. Revue canadienne de psychiatrie, 60(4), 160–167. https://doi.org/10.1177/070674371506000402
     
    O'Connell, N. E., Marston, L., Spencer, S., DeSouza, L. H., & Wand, B. M. (2018). Non-invasive brain stimulation techniques for chronic pain. The Cochrane database of systematic reviews, 4(4), CD008208. https://doi.org/10.1002/14651858.CD008208.pub5
     
    Ratcliffe, G. E., Enns, M. W., Belik, S. L., & Sareen, J. (2008). Chronic pain conditions and suicidal ideation and suicide attempts: an epidemiologic perspective. The Clinical journal of pain, 24(3), 204–210. https://doi.org/10.1097/AJP.0b013e31815ca2a3
     
    Tunks, E. R., Crook, J., & Weir, R. (2008). Epidemiology of chronic pain with psychological comorbidity: prevalence, risk, course, and prognosis. Canadian journal of psychiatry. Revue canadienne de psychiatrie, 53(4), 224–234. https://doi.org/10.1177/070674370805300403
     
    CPA Note: The views expressed in this podcast do not necessarily reflect those of the Canadian Psychiatric Association.
    For more PsychEd, follow us on Twitter (@psychedpodcast), Facebook (PsychEd Podcast), and Instagram (@psyched.podcast). You can p

    • 1h 6 min
    PsychEd Episode 34: Ketamine for Treatment-Resistant Depression with Dr. Sandhya Prashad

    PsychEd Episode 34: Ketamine for Treatment-Resistant Depression with Dr. Sandhya Prashad

    Welcome to PsychEd, the psychiatry podcast for medical learners, by medical learners.
    This episode covers ketamine for treatment-resistant depression (TRD) with Dr. Sandhya Prashad, a psychiatrist and the founder and medical director of Houston Ketamine Therapeutics. She has extensive expertise using ketamine and is one of the most experienced ketamine psychiatrists in the United States, with her clinical practice focusing on TRD and incorporating transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), sometimes in conjunction with ketamine. Dr. Prashad is also a founding member and current president of the American Society of Ketamine Physicians (ASKP), a non-profit organization created to advocate for the safe use of ketamine for mental illness and pain disorders and to expand access to ketamine therapy.
     
    We’re also experimenting with something new for this episode — providing a transcript of the entire interview! The transcript can be found at psychedpodcast.org/transcripts/ketamine. We’d love to hear your feedback as listeners on this as a feature, including whether it’s something you’d be interested in seeing for other episodes moving forward!
     
    The learning objectives for this episode are as follows:
     
    By the end of this episode, you should be able to…
    Describe ketamine and how it came to be used in the field of psychiatry. Develop an appreciation for benefits and potential harms associated with ketamine and how this compares to other treatments for depression. Understand how ketamine fits into the treatment of depression and suicidality, patient characteristics to consider before initiation, potential mechanisms of action, different models of administration, and incorporation of psychotherapy.  
    Guest expert: Dr. Sandhya Prashad
     
    Hosts: Jimmy Qian (MS2), Dr. Nikhita Singhal (PGY2), Dr. Chase Thompson (PGY3)
     
    Audio editing by: Dr. Chase Thompson
     
    Show notes by: Gray Meckling (MS4)
     
    Interview transcript by: Gray Meckling
     
    00:00 – Introduction
    03:00 – Learning objectives
    03:30 – History of ketamine
    06:20 – Recreational use of ketamine, phenomenology of the ketamine experience
    09:45 – Where does ketamine fall in the algorithm for treatment of depression?
    11:50 – Ketamine’s use in acute suicidality
    13:40 – Ketamine contraindications
    14:40 – Ketamine efficacy
    19:00 – Combining ketamine with rTMS
    21:15 – Limitations to ketamine
    24:35 – Ketamine mechanism of action
    26:05 – Ketamine formulations, and integrating ketamine into psychotherapy
    33:10 – Combining ketamine with traditional antidepressant treatment
    37:30 – Practicalities of administering ketamine
    39:40 – Ketamine as treatment for OCD and PTSD
    41:40 – Closing remarks
     
    Resources:
    American Society of Ketamine Physicians, Psychotherapists & Practitioners (ASKP) Sandhya Prashad, MD (Website) NEJM interview with Dr. Roy Perlis: Esketamine for Treatment-Resistant Depression — First FDA-Approved Antidepressant in a New Class  
    References:
    Berman, R., Cappiello, A., Anand, A., Oren, D., Heninger, G., Charney, D.. (2000) Antidepressant effects of ketamine in depressed patients. Biol Psychiatry 47: 351–354. Daly, E. J., Trivedi, M. H., Janik, A., Li, H., Zhang, Y., Li, X., ... & Thase, M. E. (2019). Efficacy of esketamine nasal spray plus oral antidepressant treatment for relapse prevention in patients with treatment-resistant depression: a randomized clinical trial. JAMA psychiatry, 76(9), 893-903. J.W. Murrough, D.V. Iosifescu, L.C. Chang, et al. Antidepressant efficacy of ketamine in treatment-resistant major depression: a two site randomized controlled trial. Am. J. Psychiatry, 2013 (170) (2013), pp. 1134-1142 Kim, J., Farchione, T., Potter, A., Chen, Q., & Temple, R. (2019). Esketamine for treatment-resistant depression-first FDA-approved antidepressant in a new class. N Engl J Med, 381(1), 1-4. McIntyre, R. S., Rosenblat, J. D., Nemeroff, C. B., Sanacora, G., Murrough, J.

    • 43 min
    PsychEd Episode 33: Treating Borderline Personality Disorder with Dr. Robert Biskin and Dr. Ronald Fraser

    PsychEd Episode 33: Treating Borderline Personality Disorder with Dr. Robert Biskin and Dr. Ronald Fraser

    Welcome to PsychEd, the psychiatry podcast for medical learners, by medical learners.
    This episode covers the treatment of borderline personality disorder with expert guests:
    Dr. Robert Biskin, Associate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at McGill University, and inpatient psychiatrist at the Borderline Personality Disorder Clinic at the McGill University Health Centre, as well as the inpatient psychiatrist at the Jewish General Hospital. Dr. Ronald Fraser, Associate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at McGill University, Adjunct Professor at Dalhousie University, and head of the Inpatient Detoxification Services and Addictions Unit, as well as director of the Extended Care Borderline Personality Disorder Clinic at the McGill University Health Centre. The learning objectives for this episode are as follows: 
    By the end of this episode, you should be able to…
    Understand the frame and principles of care for the treatment of individuals with borderline personality disorder. Explore the approach to the treatment of individuals with borderline personality disorder: On presentation in crisis to the emergency department. During an inpatient psychiatric admission. In the context of psychiatric outpatient care. Understand the use of psychotherapy in the treatment of individuals with borderline personality disorder. Understand the use of pharmacotherapy in the treatment of individuals with borderline personality disorder Guest: Dr. Robert Biskin and Dr. Ronald Fraser
    Hosts: Dr. Sarah Hanafi (PGY3), Dr. Nima Nahiddi (PGY3), Audrey Le (CC4)
    Audio editing by Audrey Le
    Show notes by Dr. Nima Nahiddi
    Interview Content:
     Introduction – 0:00 Learning objectives – 0:35 Principles of care for treatment of BPD – 1:16 The therapeutic frame – 5:40  Approach to the management of emergency department presentations – 9:10 Dialectical behaviour therapy (DBT) – 16:15 Suicidality and self-harm in BPD diagnosis – 21:05 Pharmacotherapy for symptom treatment – 22:40 Treatment of co-morbid disorders – 32:35  Management of safety risk – 39:30 Stigma in treatment of BPD – 46:05 Closing remarks – 52:00 Resources/Articles:
    The Treatment of Borderline Personality Disorder: Implications of Research on Diagnosis, Etiology, and Outcome | Annual Review of Clinical Psychology (annualreviews.org) Efficacy of Psychotherapies for Borderline Personality Disorder: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis | Psychiatry | JAMA Psychiatry | JAMA Network National Education Alliance for Borderline Personality Disorder References:
     
    Cristea I.A., Gentili C, Cotet CD, Palomba D, Barbui C, Cuijpers P. (2017) Efficacy of Psychotherapies for Borderline Personality Disorder: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis. JAMA Psychiatry. 74(4):319–328. doi:10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2016.4287 Ingenhoven T, Lafay P, Rinne T, Passchier J, Duivenvoorden H  J. (2010) Effectiveness of pharmacotherapy for severe personality disorders: meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials. Clin Psychiatry. 71(1):14.  Paris J. (2009). The Treatment of Borderline Personality Disorder: Implications of Research on Diagnosis, Etiology, and Outcome. Review of Clinical Psychology. 5:1, 277-290 Stoffers J, Vollm BA, Rucker G, Timmer A, Huband N. (2010) Pharmacological interventions for borderline personality disorder. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Issue 6. Art. No.: CD005653. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD005653 Storebø  OJ, Stoffers-Winterling  JM, Völlm  BA, Kongerslev  MT, Mattivi  JT, Jørgensen  MS, Faltinsen  E, Todorovac  A, Sales  CP, Callesen  HE, Lieb  K, Simonsen  E.  (2020) Psychological therapies for people with borderline personality disorder. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Issue 5. Art. No.: CD012955. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD012955.pub2  
     
    CPA Note: The views expressed in this podcast do not necessarily reflect those of the Canadian Psychiatric Association.
    For more PsychEd,

    • 54 min

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