5 épisodes

The concept of the frontier among scholars has changed considerably over the past 25 years. This symposium invited historians, literary scholars, and cultural critics to revisit the famed Frontier Thesis written by Frederick Jackson Turner more than 100 years ago.

In three panel discussions, scholars explored the significance of the frontier for the study of U.S. imperialism, American culture, and settler colonialism. The conference included keynote addresses by Kerwin Lee Klein, of University of California, Berkeley (audio unavailable); and Patrick Wolfe, of La Trobe University.

The conference took place at the Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens on Feb. 25, 2012, and was convened by graduate students Erik Altenbernd (University of California, Irvine) and Alex Young (University of Southern California). It was sponsored by the Huntington-USC Institute on California and the West; USC-Huntington Early Modern Studies Institute; the Research Division of The Huntington Library; the Salvatori Fund, USC Dornsife College of Arts and Letters; the Department of English, USC; the University of California Multi-Campus Research Unit in World History; and the Department of American Studies and Ethnicity, USC.

The Significance of the Frontier in an Age of Transnational History The Huntington

    • Culture et société
    • 5.0, 1 note

The concept of the frontier among scholars has changed considerably over the past 25 years. This symposium invited historians, literary scholars, and cultural critics to revisit the famed Frontier Thesis written by Frederick Jackson Turner more than 100 years ago.

In three panel discussions, scholars explored the significance of the frontier for the study of U.S. imperialism, American culture, and settler colonialism. The conference included keynote addresses by Kerwin Lee Klein, of University of California, Berkeley (audio unavailable); and Patrick Wolfe, of La Trobe University.

The conference took place at the Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens on Feb. 25, 2012, and was convened by graduate students Erik Altenbernd (University of California, Irvine) and Alex Young (University of Southern California). It was sponsored by the Huntington-USC Institute on California and the West; USC-Huntington Early Modern Studies Institute; the Research Division of The Huntington Library; the Salvatori Fund, USC Dornsife College of Arts and Letters; the Department of English, USC; the University of California Multi-Campus Research Unit in World History; and the Department of American Studies and Ethnicity, USC.

    Opening Remarks

    Opening Remarks

    Erik Altenbernd and Alex Young welcome participants to the conference “The Significance of the Frontier in an Age of Transnational History,” held at The Huntington Library on Feb. 25, 2012. They are introduced by William Deverell, director of the Huntington-USC Institute on California and the West.

    • 15 min
    The U.S. Frontier in its Global Contexts (Panel 1)

    The U.S. Frontier in its Global Contexts (Panel 1)

    Panelists discuss “The U.S. Frontier in its Global Contexts” at the conference “The Significance of the Frontier in an Age of Transnational History,” held at The Huntington Library on Feb. 25, 2012. On the panel were Brian Delay, University of California, Berkeley, History; Jay Gitlin, Yale University, Howard R. Lamar Center for the Study of Frontiers and Borders; David Igler, University of California, Irvine; Patricia Nelson Limerick, University of Colorado at Boulder, Center of the American West; David Wrobel, University of Oklahoma, History; William Deverell, University of Southern California, History.

    • 1h 29 min
    The Significance of the Frontier in American Culture after the Cold War (Panel 2)

    The Significance of the Frontier in American Culture after the Cold War (Panel 2)

    Panelists discuss “The Significance of the Frontier in American Culture after the Cold War” at the conference “The Significance of the Frontier in an Age of Transnational History,” held at The Huntington Library on Feb. 25, 2012. On the panel were Krista Comer, Rice University, English; Melody Graulich, Utah State University, English; William Handley, University of Southern California, English; Enrique Lima, University of Oregon, English; Donald Pease, Dartmouth College, English; and John Carlos Rowe, University of Southern California, English, American Studies and Ethnicity.

    • 1h 25 min
    Settler Colonialism, Indigenous Studies, and the Concept of the Frontier (Panel 3)

    Settler Colonialism, Indigenous Studies, and the Concept of the Frontier (Panel 3)

    Panelists discuss “Settler Colonialism, Indigenous Studies, and the Concept of the Frontier” at the conference “The Significance of the Frontier in an Age of Transnational History,” held at The Huntington Library on Feb. 25, 2012. On the panel were Jodi Byrd, University of Illinois, American Indian Studies, English; Margaret Jacobs, University of Nebraska, History, Women’s and Gender Studies; Laura Mitchell, University of California, Irvine; Aziz Rana, Cornell University, Law; and Mark Rifkin, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, English, Gender Studies.

    • 1h 29 min
    Settler Colonialism in the United States and Israel/Palestine (Keynote Address)

    Settler Colonialism in the United States and Israel/Palestine (Keynote Address)

    Patrick Wolfe, of La Trobe University (Melbourne), delivers the concluding keynote address to the conference “The Significance of the Frontier in an Age of Transnational History,” held at The Huntington Library on Feb. 25, 2012.

    • 1h 6 min

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