400 épisodes

Ryan and Bev Ellis are partners in film nerdery who share their often humorous musings on the AFI's 1998 & 2007 lists of the greatest 100 American films ever made. But we finished with that in December 2015, so now we just review anything we feel like!

The Top 100 Project Ryan Ellis & Bev Ellis

    • Télévision et cinéma

Ryan and Bev Ellis are partners in film nerdery who share their often humorous musings on the AFI's 1998 & 2007 lists of the greatest 100 American films ever made. But we finished with that in December 2015, so now we just review anything we feel like!

    Donnie Darko

    Donnie Darko

    Wait, hang on, another movie about a giant rabbit? Only this time the rabbit doesn’t drink booze and pal around with Jimmy Stewart, but leads a teenager with mental problems down the path of scientific discovery and time travel? Well, yeah! Donnie Darko has been analyzed half to death and that’s impressive considering how indifferently the picture was received 20 years ago. Richard Kelly was only 26 back then and he was making his first (and certainly best) feature film. It’s far from perfect, although it has a slew of incredible moments and a dynamite soundtrack. Jake Gyllenhaal sports a solid Kubrick glower and he showed us many glimpses of how good an actor he was going to become. The whole eclectic cast is up to the task, really, and what a trippy movie they’re in.  Okay, but, what about that plot? We give that question a shot! So stay in your comfy bed, but don’t doubt our commitment to Sparkle Motion as the 397th Ellises’ Analysis rips into the story of Donnie D.
    You’d like to be awake when a jet engine is about to crush you, so order many bags of Sparkplug Coffee to give you the boost. Your beans will be 20% cheaper if you use our promo code (“top100project”).
    If you spend any time on Twitter, say hi to us: @moviefiend51 and @bevellisellis
    Our website remains top100project.com
    Ryan also jaws about sports motion pictures on Scoring At The Movies

    • 49 min
    A.I. Artificial Intelligence

    A.I. Artificial Intelligence

    We began our talk about A.I. at the ending of the movie because the last 15 or 20 minutes have always been controversial. Didn’t it already have the most poetic ending possible before wishes started coming true? We debate that hot topic. Merging the visions of Steven Spielberg and Stanley Kubrick was always going to be an odd mix, but you might be surprised to learn which of them brought the negative and which of them brought the positive to this story. What shouldn’t be surprising is that Haley Joel Osment is terrific in one of the best performances by any child in any movie. He managed to top his great work in The Sixth Sense with this beautifully crafted evolution of a robot who becomes a real boy…or as close to it as a robot can. Spielberg’s fairy tale about a mecha Pinocchio is gorgeous to look at and to listen to, even if it’s episodic and a mite too long. Maybe more than a mite. So let a teddy bear and a gigolo tag along on a quest for your mother’s love as the 396th Ellises’ Analysis continues with Sci-Fi Month and prattles on about Stan & Steve's Artificial Intelligence.
    Well, Actually: Spielberg had 6 movies on the AFI’s 1998 and 2007 Top 100 Lists (we overlooked Raiders Of The Lost Ark).
    Sparkplug Coffee might not be GOOD for androids, robots or mechanical people, but nobody can prove it’s BAD for them either. Check out Sparkplug’s site and keep in mind that they will pony up a 20% discount if you use our promo code (“top100project”) at checkout.
    Tweeting? Don’t mind if we (sometimes) do: @moviefiend51 and @bevellisellis
    Our website is top100project.com
    Ryan also has a sports movie podcast on Scoring At The Movies

    • 48 min
    The Fly

    The Fly

    Be Sci-Fi Month, be very Sci-Fi Month. The 395th Ellises’ Analysis is the first of 4 flicks we’ll discuss in June that identify with that creative genre. When you talk about David Cronenberg’s 3 or 4 best pictures, The Fly has got to be a part of that shortlist. Sure, there’s his trademark body horror and some jump scares and plenty of creepiness throughout, but it’s also got more heart than almost any other horror movie. It’s really a tragic love story sold as a fright flick. Jeff Goldblum is at his best here (putting up with extensive, Oscar-winning make-up that eventually swallows him right up), but Geena Davis’ performance is wonderful too. She’s the reason the last scene could make a person require eye-drying tissues. Lauded at the time, The Fly is maturing like a fine Canadian wine and it’s even better now. So don’t liquify your food in disgusting ways. Just curl up with our podcast and a few (solid) donuts to hear us dig into the nooks and crannies of the legend of Brundlefly.
    Well, Actually: Ronnie’s character is briefly in The Fly II, but Saffron Henderson plays her, not Geena Davis. Also, Jeff Goldblum HAS been in other movies we’ve covered beyond the ones that were mentioned, including his non-speaking role in Nashville and his one-line cameo in Annie Hall.
    Scientists who keep strange hours and transform into strange things would be well served to head over to Sparkplug Coffee. They’ve got the good stuff and they’ll also provide you a one-time 20% discount. All you have to do is apply our promo code (“top100project”) when you’re ready to fly.
    We’re in the Twittersphere: @moviefiend51 and @bevellisellis
    Our website is top100project.com
    Ryan also talks sports on another channel called Scoring At The Movies

    • 50 min
    Nomadland

    Nomadland

    It’s only been about a month since this year’s weird Oscars, but this was a good time for the 394th Ellises’ Analysis to spend a solid hour unraveling the beauty of the heartfelt winner of Best Picture. A she so often is, Frances McDormand is quiet, stern and so real. She lets her fellow performers and Chloe Zhao’s story come to her. Fern/Fran accomplishes more with a simple gesture than most people do in a 10-minute monologue. And she’s working with mostly unprofessional actors! They’re real nomads basically just playing themselves, but they all shine (especially Bob and Swankie). Nomadland gets better with multiple viewings and we’ll explain why some elements were more personal to us this time than they were when we saw it for the first time back in early April. So don’t be a loner who can’t be tied down. Or do, if that’s what you want and need. But whichever path you take, toss our chat into your ears and feel every feeling in this movie right along with us.
    This episode is dedicated to Jason Ellis. If you’re struggling and you need emotional support, please go to this link.
    Well, Actually: The director of Miss Pettigrew Lives For A Day is indeed Bharat Nalluri. Also, the movie WAS shot digitally. Also also, in yet again watching the scene between Fern and Bob towards the end, there is practically no doubt that Fern was always a wanderer at heart and—love for her husband aside—she never wanted to be stuck in one place.
    Coffee while driving as much as these characters do seems like a prerequisite and we have just the company for you non-nomads. Sparkplug Coffee is our sponsor and they’d like to give you a 20% discount. Just plug in “top100project” into the appropriate place at check-out.
    Tweet us on the road or wherever your home is: @moviefiend51 and @bevellisellis
    Our website is top100project.com
    Ryan yibbers about sports flicks on Scoring At The Movies

    • 59 min
    Victoria Day Grab Bag

    Victoria Day Grab Bag

    Bonus episode! Taking a page from our COVID-19 specials last year, we each made 2 movie recommendations in this episode, using the caveat that we had to sell the flicks to you using only 19 words. Each of us also tossed around some trivia questions. And we opened up the emailbag! Gender identification at the Oscars came up. Unlikeable directors came up. Desert island movies came up. The Golden Globes controversy came up. And classic flicks that we’ve previously reviewed like The Shining, E.T., Back To The Future, Pulp Fiction, Jaws and Django Unchained came up too. So bonus it up!
    Note: Ryan has seen Wonderstruck since this recording. The verdict? It’s handsomely made and the actors are pretty good, but the story isn’t very compelling and, while the ending is heartfelt, it’s not very believable.
    If you do some Tweetin’, Tweet us: @moviefiend51 and @bevellisellis

    • 33 min
    Shrek

    Shrek

    You’ll get 2 reviews for the price of one in the 393rd Ellises’ Analysis because the sequel came up a lot in this chat about Dreamworks’ groundbreaking Shrek. The snarky and often meta sense of humour that was so fresh at the time is still pretty gut-busting 2 decades later. Getting comedy superstars like Mike Myers and Eddie Murphy to provide the voices for the two iconic main roles was not as common as it's become ever since, but, wow, did the Myers/Murphy stunt casting (not to mention Cameron Diaz and especially John Lithgow) work perfectly. And while Pixar was and is the benchmark for digital animation, the look of Shrek is comparatively awesome in its own right. Well, mostly. So as you digest our gab about the ogre, please don’t bully the bad guy about his pintsizedness when there are so many other reason to dislike him, but DO love yourself no matter what you look like.
    You can live happily ever after if you become a customer of Sparkplug Coffee. Man, that’s a big promise. Okay, you can just get a great bunch of beans to go with your waffles. And, hey, they continue to offer a 20% discount if you use our promo code (“top100project”) at checkout.
    If you like to tweet, you can find us @moviefiend51 and @bevellisellis
    Our website is top100project.com
    Ryan also has a sports movie podcast on Scoring At The Movies

    • 44 min

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