46 épisodes

Wild and Precious Conversations takes a weekly theme related to you as hero of your one story, and invites a guest to share their expertise and experience with you. A podcast by the Underbelly Project.

underbelly.substack.com

Wild and Precious Conversations Wendy Kiana Kelly

    • Relations

Wild and Precious Conversations takes a weekly theme related to you as hero of your one story, and invites a guest to share their expertise and experience with you. A podcast by the Underbelly Project.

underbelly.substack.com

    Perception: Conversation with Stan Smith

    Perception: Conversation with Stan Smith

    Perception: It’s all in how you see — the angle, the lens, the depth. This week, we continue our conversation on family, immigration, vulnerability and beauty with Stan Smith, adjunct professor of social work at USC.

    You have to wait until the 37 minute mark to get there, but this is where we end up:

    “I think it's true. Family is beautiful.

    Not Just the family that I think I deserve to have, or my kid deserves to have, or the family you deserve to have, or the one sitting across the pew from me at St.

    Charles or whatever church body that I claim affiliation with, not just the ones that are part of the same school or part of the same culture. Family is beautiful simply because of what family is. Period. Family is beautiful across our. Institutional lines and across our affiliations of culture to a central more deeper place that I think that has meaning with our species.”

    It’s worth it, though. I have been learning all along, but recently set aside still more time to learn sound editing — I think you will agree that it paid off.

    We speak about keeping families together, the work many people are doing to keep kids safe, the reason that our own vulnerability or lack of vulnerability keeps us from making positive changes, and so much more.

    It’s all in our perception.

    Notes:

    Stan Smith — Contact email for Stan.

    Hull House — Jane Addams, the “patron saint” of social work.

    Onward. With deeper perception:

    The Underbelly Project: A weekly workout for your emotional strength and flexibility. If you’re not afraid to get dusty and maybe laugh a bit together, join me and let’s get emotionally strong.

    If you enjoyed this conversation, a small ask: Share with anyone you know who might like what we’re doing over here. Excited to stay in the arena with you.

    Get on the email list at underbelly.substack.com

    • 43 min
    Persistence: Conversation with Stan Smith

    Persistence: Conversation with Stan Smith

    Persist! It’s those little efforts we make that, over time, move mountains. Today I get to share the first part of a two part conversation with Stan Smith, social worker and adjunct professor of social work at USC (University of Southern California).

    So, awhile back, I asked Stan about children as possibly the most vulnerable members of our society.

    He responded with: “We are the vulnerable ones who are afraid of that vulnerability.”

    I start this episode off with that exchange, and we go from there. It’s obvious that Stan has taught for a decade because it didn’t seem to matter what question I threw at him, he answered with a depth and grace that I am really honoured to share.

    This episode is divided into two parts. Today, we mainly tackle what we as a society should provide families and children so that they can thrive. What should that framework look like?

    At around the three minute mark, Stan notes that what we might value is not necessarily what we make rules and regulations around because the stuff we value isn’t necessarily stuff that can be commodified.

    Unlikely adoptions are shared, where families end up with more children than were planned for, and what a positive outcome that can be.

    How having enough abundance, enough affluence, makes it sometimes more difficult to see the cracks in society.

    At around the 19 minute mark: “Think about it, right? Because that is in essence what a civil society is trying to do, right. Is create a commons for which children have certain basic needs met.”

    At around 28 minutes, I ask, “what if we just flip that script and when we see somebody suffering and it could be a welfare region suffering — instead of wanting to punish them, we ask them what they need and we give it to them.”

    We end with: “If somebody points a finger and says, this woman went into a job interview and she committed abuse while doing it, that's one perspective. Another perspective was she didn't have enough resources.”

    Another perspective…

    Next week, we continue this wild and precious conversation. Thanks for listening!

    Notes:

    Dare mo Shira Nai — Nobody Knows — I mention this movie in the introduction to this episode. It’s a 2004 movie set in Tokyo. Four kids are living alone in an apartment as they try to figure out how to survive.

    Onward. We persist.

    The Underbelly Project: A weekly workout for your emotional strength and flexibility. If you’re not afraid to get dusty and maybe laugh a bit together, join me and let’s get emotionally strong.

    If you enjoyed this conversation, a small ask: Share with anyone you know who might like what we’re doing over here. Excited to stay in the arena with you.

    Get on the email list at underbelly.substack.com

    • 37 min
    Joy: Conversation with Anna Katarina of Rumour Mill

    Joy: Conversation with Anna Katarina of Rumour Mill

    Joy! This week, Anna Katarina and I speak about Rumour Mill, the band she created with Aline Daigle — and why you (we) should all sing, support live music, and music, music, music.

    Sing! Singing helps us move from our reactive (fight, flight, freeze or fawn) “lizard-brains” and into our grounded, responsive, fully-alive, fully-human selves.

    Singing makes it possible to access a full range of emotions. We *know* this, but sometimes we need a reminder.

    Anna Katarina (with lifelong friend Aline Daigle) created Rumour Mill, a West Coast Canadian indie band that has brought be to tears more than once.

    I feel so honoured to have had a chance to have a conversation with Anna recently. We speak about shame - and how it seems to stop us from singing, when really, singing should be part of our daily experience.

    We talk about harmony, and the lovely tension of harmony, where we all follow our own path, coming together on the same note, moving away again, then coming together.

    And - Rumour Mill will be performing live(stream) at the Capitol Theatre in Nelson, BC, on Friday, December 18, at 7:00. Link below.

    For a taste of their music, I included Song for a Winter Night and Only Love at the end of this episode. Enjoy!

    Notes:

    Rumour Mill — Aline Daigle (violin and vocals) and Anna Katarina (piano and vocals)

    Capitol Theatre Instagram post about Rumour Mill Livestream — Friday, December 18

    Rumour Mill Livestream at the Capitol Theatre — December 18, at 7:00 pm (PST)

    Onward. Toward a more joyful way of living together.

    The Underbelly Project: A weekly workout for your emotional strength and flexibility. If you’re not afraid to get dusty and maybe laugh a bit together, join me and let’s get emotionally strong!

    If you enjoyed this conversation, a small ask: Share with anyone you know who might like what we’re doing over here. Excited to stay in the arena with you.

    Get on the email list at underbelly.substack.com

    • 39 min
    Peace: Conversation with Dr. Jennie Barron

    Peace: Conversation with Dr. Jennie Barron

    Welcome to another episode of Wild and Precious Conversations. This week, a conversation with Dr. Jennie Barron, executive director of the Mir Center for Peace.

    Jennie spoke with me about her dissertation which is her research into urban orchards.

    Urban orchards is code, I found, for some awfully subversive ideas.

    Jennie unpacked these for me as one might a series of very cherished gifts — first, by challenging my understanding of ownership. Imbuing it with the sense that it’s something we’re responsible to. (@10:55)

    There’s a decoupling of inputs and outputs…”they thought not what they were getting from the community orchard, but really what they were giving”

    We talk about the “Why” of the community orchard, and one response given is “It makes us whole”

    We are ostensibly talking about orchards but what happens when we use an orchard — a friendly, nonthreatening concept like a bunch of fruit trees — to talk about concepts like giving and gifts and sharing and community is that we are able to talk about our responsibility to one another and how we can live together in harmony, in peace, without touching a nerve.

    Have a listen. This conversation goes very well with last week’s conversation with Cam Brewer, also about the Commons.

    Notes:

    Community Orchards and Hyde’s Theory of the Gift — by Jennie Barron

    Mir Centre for Peace

    Onward. Toward a more peaceful way of living together.

    The Underbelly Project: A weekly workout for your emotional strength and flexibility. If you’re not afraid to get dusty and maybe laugh a bit together, join me and let’s get emotionally strong!

    If you enjoyed this conversation, a small ask: Share with anyone you know who might like what we’re doing over here. Excited to stay in the arena with you.

    Get on the email list at underbelly.substack.com

    • 46 min
    Hope: Conversation with Cam Brewer

    Hope: Conversation with Cam Brewer

    Welcome to another episode of Wild and Precious Conversations. This week, a conversation with Cam Brewer, lawyer, activist, author.

    I told Cam that we would be speaking about the commons.

    Ha.

    I planned to have this conversation and then put it out as a helpful adjunct to another couple conversations I am waiting to share with you about both our collective responsibility as a society and our how we can use that collective responsibility as an empowering force for good in the world.

    Well, as we conversed, I realized wholeheartedly that this conversation was filling me with hope.

    Hope for us as humans. Hope for us — that we really can wrap our brains around the idea that we are enough, we have enough, and we can share.

    As much as we had to learn that as little children, as much as we teach our own children.

    We can step into our responsibility and make really mature, good, healthy choices about how to use our natural commons, our economic commons, our digital commons and our communities.

    Have a listen!

    Notes:

    Cam Brewer — Bio in the Tyee

    Grameen Bank

    Founders of BioNTech

    Onward. Excited to begin more conversations again. I have HOPES and plans for the next few weeks. Stay tuned :)

    The Underbelly Project: A weekly workout for your emotional strength and flexibility. If you’re not afraid to get dusty and maybe shed a few tears together, join me and let’s get emotionally strong!

    And please, if you know anyone who might like to share this journey, share this project. Excited to stay in the arena with you.

    Get on the email list at underbelly.substack.com

    • 44 min
    Integrity: Conversation with David Hall

    Integrity: Conversation with David Hall

    Welcome to another episode of Wild and Precious Conversations. This week, I speak with David Hall, soon-to-be Registered Nurse specializing in Geriatrics.

    This week I had a chance to speak with my cousin, David Hall. Deciding to make a career chaing in midlife is one thing, becoming a registered nurse specializing in geriatrics is another.

    First, fingers crossed as I upped my sound editing game this week. Feedback welcome.

    I start the conversation (I feel) rather abruptly, throwing us into a contemplation of the commodification of self care.

    As a future nurse, David introduces us to really what nursing is in this modern era and we move quickly into talking about nursing ethics…

    Which leads us to thinking about what happes when you don’t have a code of ethics…which leads us to…what if you do have a code of ethics but you are a serial killer? Emma Goldman — Anarchist.

    Onward. Excited to begin more conversations again. Next week, we introduce the first in a series of what I am calling “shadow” conversations with Deirdre McClaughlin. In this series, we tackle themes that no one wants to hear about in a way that you will want to listen to... I have, at this point, had this conversation…you won’t want to miss this one.

    The Underbelly Project: A weekly workout for your emotional strength and flexibility. If you’re not afraid to get dusty and maybe shed a few tears together, join me and let’s get emotionally strong!

    And please, if you know anyone who might like to share this journey, share this project. Excited to stay in the arena with you.

    Get on the email list at underbelly.substack.com

    • 1h

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