24 episodes

Most kids can?t buy music online. Kids in many towns can only buy music at chain stores like Walmart. For that reason Lucid Nation decided to archive all our music up till now for free download. To make it a special event for us and for people who like our music, we came up with the idea of the Hundred Song March: one song a day for a hundred days. Actually it will be closer to 150 songs and there will be missed days, and two missed weeks when our programmer goes on vacation. Consequently on some days we?ll put up more than one song to make up for lapses. All songs will have a story to go with them even if only a few sentences. We?ll include some pictures, too. When the Hundred Song March is complete the archive will remain available at Lucidnation.com. Brain Floss Records retains all copyright ownership. We hereby grant podcasters and radio DJs the right to broadcast all tracks. We hereby grant listeners the right to make copies for themselves and others. We reserve rights for use in soundtracks of any kind, and for any duplication for sale or other commercial use.

100 SONG MARCH Lucid Nation / Brain Floss Records

    • Music

Most kids can?t buy music online. Kids in many towns can only buy music at chain stores like Walmart. For that reason Lucid Nation decided to archive all our music up till now for free download. To make it a special event for us and for people who like our music, we came up with the idea of the Hundred Song March: one song a day for a hundred days. Actually it will be closer to 150 songs and there will be missed days, and two missed weeks when our programmer goes on vacation. Consequently on some days we?ll put up more than one song to make up for lapses. All songs will have a story to go with them even if only a few sentences. We?ll include some pictures, too. When the Hundred Song March is complete the archive will remain available at Lucidnation.com. Brain Floss Records retains all copyright ownership. We hereby grant podcasters and radio DJs the right to broadcast all tracks. We hereby grant listeners the right to make copies for themselves and others. We reserve rights for use in soundtracks of any kind, and for any duplication for sale or other commercial use.

    song 167 : My Bad (Cat Cult: The Origins of Lucid Nation)

    song 167 : My Bad (Cat Cult: The Origins of Lucid Nation)

    This fragment is the first recording of Ronnie and me playing together. We had just begun playing guitar a couple months before so our timing sucked, but I like the way it sounds like some kind of forgotten recording from the days of the Delta Blues, a couple of drunk sharecroppers learning to strum. I include it because it is the only remaining baby picture of Lucid Nation and you can see how deeply the blues had us under its spell. I said “my bad’ when I made a mistake so even though I didn’t want to sing at all I was the first vocalist for Cat Cult! The band is mine! Mine I tell you! My unconscious was all set to go go go but it would take riot grrrl to kick open the door. Listen to the song: Click Here

    song 166 : Fox On Ice (Cat Cult: The Origins of Lucid Nation)

    song 166 : Fox On Ice (Cat Cult: The Origins of Lucid Nation)

    This is Ronnie’s first and by far most primitive experiment with multi-track recording and effects. At first, it seems by fox Ronnie means foxy like the rock stars of yore he mentions but really this title is lifted from the I Ching. Ronnie’s a big Lee Scratch Perry fan as mentioned and I think you can hear a bit of that in this mix. He plays the big solo near the end; I do the meandering bluesy slide licks the rest of the song. There are two kinds of rock and roll: entertainment and enlightenment. Sometimes an artist is both. Any real rock fan is wondering, along with me, what happened to rock as enlightenment? The electric troubadour poets who crystallized and galvanized generations, we haven’t had a real one of those in a long ass time. In this song I think Ronnie captures one reason for that. He sings about Jimi Hendrix, John Lennon and Jim Morrison, three of the most devoted rock as enlightenment poets. Their deaths resonate with an isolation and resentment that would make any sensitive artist think twice about following the trail they blazed. I’m sure Kurt Cobain would have had a verse in this song but he was still alive when it was written. Listen to the song: Click Here

    song 165 : Ways Across (Cat Cult: The Origins of Lucid Nation)

    song 165 : Ways Across (Cat Cult: The Origins of Lucid Nation)

    I wrote the music for Ronnie’s lyrics about patience overcoming violence at a time when AC/DC and Muddy Waters were all I would listen to. “Backed into a corner of mirrors You got only yourself to blame Change is original sin When you play the sacrifice game Sometimes you find it even in your family Like being at the mercy of Nazi charity “Baby, ain’t no need for suicide or murder there’s always a way across if you walk a little further you gotta walk a little further you will find ways across.” You’ll notice that Ronnie at the time had a bad case of baby-itis. Almost every song gets at least one “baby”. It reminds me of a story I was told about the guy who sang for horrible hit band Foreigner. He had “hey-itis”. He had to sing “hey” at least twice in every song, and sometimes he’d add a “hey” after every line. Finally the producer said one more “hey” and you’re fired. That was the cure. Ronnie required nothing so drastic. Listen to the song: Click Here

    song 164 : Wounded Knee (Cat Cult: The Origins of Lucid Nation)

    song 164 : Wounded Knee (Cat Cult: The Origins of Lucid Nation)

    I wrote the music for this song, Ronnie wrote the vocals. I could never sing anything like: I have an ancestor who was a chief on the Cherokee Trail of Tears. Because of the fate of so many of his family at the hands of the Nazis, Ronnie has strong feelings about the genocides suffered by Native Americans and slaves. Check out Ronnie’s way with lyrics: “Devil headed people came over on a boat They had a disease that made ‘em want to choke The life out of everything beautiful, wild and free, Inside those pilgrim eyes were highways of concrete.” “Don’t it make you wish poor Bob had possession over Judgment Day” is a nod to his obsession at the time with all things Robert Johnson. But what I want to know is how did a first generation American immigrant kid become such a total redneck (as proven by this drawly bluesy rasp of a vocal that sounds like it was lifted off a 78)? Listen to the song: Click Here

    song 163 : You Got Soul (Cat Cult: The Origins of Lucid Nation)

    song 163 : You Got Soul (Cat Cult: The Origins of Lucid Nation)

    I wrote the music for this song, Ronnie wrote the vocals. I could never sing anything like: “You come knockin at my bedroom door like some kind of guilty conspirator lke a spy in the night like an angel on the sly like the southern sun in the morning sky talk to me all night about your boyfriend follow me home into my bed Tell me all and everything you’ve seen You’re first love and last dream Tell me your secrets with a kiss Use the talk of fingertips.” I think those are lyrics are beautiful but I would never sing anything so blatantly romantic, and neither would Bon Scott or Ronnie van Zandt, so I’m okay about it. Listen to the song: Click Here

    song 162 : What You Do (Cat Cult: The Origins of Lucid Nation)

    song 162 : What You Do (Cat Cult: The Origins of Lucid Nation)

    That glitch at the beginning shows how close we came to recording over this song! Way too silly and romantic for Tamra to ever sing, but cute, in a Marc Bolan with a dash of silly Lennon kinda way. I love the bluesy interplay of our guitars. I guess our instincts were good because we had no clue and a lot to learn! We were convinced we could not be good because we had not been playing long enough. Columbia Records’ interest in us was like some kind of strange cosmic joke. Instead of ambitiously exploiting it, we were waiting for the punch line. Listen to the song: Click Here

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