49 episodes

Mongol Invasions, Napoleonic Wars, Diadochi Wars, Rome and the Cold War. Every part of your life -the words you speak, the ideas you share- can be traced to our history, but how well do you really know the stories? We’ll take you to the events, the times and the people that shaped our world. Hosted by David Schroder for Kings and Generals.

Ages of Conquest: a Kings and Generals Podcast Kings and Generals

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    • 5.0, 27 Ratings

Mongol Invasions, Napoleonic Wars, Diadochi Wars, Rome and the Cold War. Every part of your life -the words you speak, the ideas you share- can be traced to our history, but how well do you really know the stories? We’ll take you to the events, the times and the people that shaped our world. Hosted by David Schroder for Kings and Generals.

    2.19. History of the Mongols: Mongol Occupation of Europe

    2.19. History of the Mongols: Mongol Occupation of Europe

    A discussion on the Mongols presence in Hungary and Eastern Europe after the climactic battle of Mohi in 1241, up to their withdrawal in early 1242, touching on theories for the withdrawal and the reality of it

    • 29 min
    2.18. History of the Mongols: Legnica and Mohi

    2.18. History of the Mongols: Legnica and Mohi

    First Mongol Invasion of Hungary and Poland

    • 24 min
    2.17. History of the Mongols: Fall of Rus

    2.17. History of the Mongols: Fall of Rus

    Western Invasion II

    • 26 min
    2.16. History of the Mongols: To Russia with Hate

    2.16. History of the Mongols: To Russia with Hate

    Western Invasion I

    • 29 min
    2.15. History of the Mongols: Mongols went down to Georgia

    2.15. History of the Mongols: Mongols went down to Georgia

        While Ogedai Khaan led his armies in the final war against the Jurchen Jin Dynasty, covered in our previous episode, this was far from the only theatre his forces operated in. As the conquest of northern China was completed, Chormaqun Noyan brought Mongols armies back to the west, returning to Iran to hunt down the energetic Khwarezmian Prince, Jalal al-Din Mingburnu, hoping to restore his father’s empire. In the course of this, the Mongols effectively completed the conquest of Iran, the Caucasus and entered Anatolia- a great southwestern expansion of the empire. At the same time, Mongol armies under Subutai conquered the western steppes and Rus’ principalities, a vast, two pronged pincer assault on western Eurasia, and the subject of our following episodes.
     
        First, we must wind the clock back from the 1230s to the Khwarezmian campaign of Chinggis Khan in the 1220s. As you’ll recall from that episode, the Mongol invasion at the end of 1219 brought about the near total collapse of the Khwarezmian defense and flight of the empire’s ruler, Muhammad II Khwarezm-Shah. Muhammad died at the end of 1220, harried to his end by Jebe and Subutai. On his death in December, Shah Muhammad’s son Jalal al-Din Mingburnu, a far braver and more talented general, took up the mantle of leadership- or rather, what was left of it. Rallying what forces he could, he eventually made his way into what is now Afghanistan, defeating two Mongol armies but finally crushed by Chinggis Khan himself on the Indus river in November 1221. At the battle's climax, Mingburnu spurred his horse off the cliff and into the Indus, swimming across and making into the Punjab. Chinggis Khan, to give the devil his due, is said to have personally ordered archers not to fire on him, admiring Jalal al-Din’s courage. The same mercy was not spread to other Khwarezmian troops trying to make it across the river.
     
        Jalal al-Din spent the next three years in northwestern India. At that time, northern India was ruled by several Muslim warlords, mainly former generals of the Ghurid Empire which had once stretched from Iran across northern India. Among these was the general Iltutmish, based in Delhi- the origins of the Delhi Sultanate. At the end of the thirteenth century, the Delhi Sultanate had the strength to repel Mongolian invasion, but in the 1220s was only one power among several. At the time of Jalal al-Din’s arrival,  Iltutmish of Delhi’s main rival was Qubacha, a fellow Ghurid controlling the Punjab and lower reaches of the Indus River. Despite being fellow Muslims, the post-Ghurid powers had little love for the Khwarezmians. Jalal al-Din’s father Muhammad had been a stalwart foe of the Ghurids, and after the Ghurid collapse in the early 1200s, it was the Khwarezm-shah who had gobbled up their western territories in Iran and Afghanistan, bringing Khwarezmian influence right to the borders of India.  Jalal al-Din’s own appanage given to him by his father was the former Ghurid capital of Ghazna. Further, the Khwarezmians had also become foes of the ‘Abbasid Caliph in Baghdad, who provided his holy support to those generals battling the Khwarezm-shah. The Khwarezmian reputation was that of an aggressive, unreliable and expansionist empire, and the chief scion of that house, Jalal al-Din, was not destined to enjoy a warm welcome among his co-religionists in India, nor among those Hindu rulers still extant in the region. 
     
        Upon his defeat on the Indus, Jalal al-Din needed to make space for himself from the Mongols, who initially turned back from the river but soon sent parties to hunt for Mingburnu.  Managing to gather survivors from the Indus battle and other refugees from the invasion, his victory over local Hindus in the Salt Range brought defections to Jalal al-Din’s force. Charismatic and with a reputation as

    • 31 min
    2.14. History of the Mongols: Fall of the Jin

    2.14. History of the Mongols: Fall of the Jin

    Ogedei finishes what Chinggis started

    • 30 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
27 Ratings

27 Ratings

leaf fantasy ,

Well researched, deep and well-presented…

Great podcast - highly recommended if you are interested in the subject matter…

Surfing the Crowds ,

Amazing, informative and entertaining

Very much up to the standard of their YouTube channel. Gives you great detail on the history while bringing it to life with a narrative that makes you feel like your experiencing the events. An absolute must for any history buff or someone casually wanting to learn.

NaoiseSwansonCooney ,

Quality history podcast

I love the kings and generals YouTube channel and think it’s great that they are making a podcast

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