122 episodes

Airing Pain is the online radio programme and podcast from Pain Concern (http://painconcern.org.uk/) .
Each month we bring together people with chronic pain and top specialists to talk about resources that can help.
You can listen to Airing Pain every Tuesday and Sunday at 8pm via Able Radio (https://www.ableradio.com/radio1.html) , with all episodes available on demand here and on our website (http://painconcern.org.uk/airing-pain/) .
Or subscribe via Apple Podcasts, Spotify or your favourite podcast app to get the latest progs delivered straight to your mobile or tablet.
Pain Concern is a charity registered in Scotland SC023559.

Airing Pain Airing Pain

    • Health & Fitness
    • 5.0, 7 Ratings

Airing Pain is the online radio programme and podcast from Pain Concern (http://painconcern.org.uk/) .
Each month we bring together people with chronic pain and top specialists to talk about resources that can help.
You can listen to Airing Pain every Tuesday and Sunday at 8pm via Able Radio (https://www.ableradio.com/radio1.html) , with all episodes available on demand here and on our website (http://painconcern.org.uk/airing-pain/) .
Or subscribe via Apple Podcasts, Spotify or your favourite podcast app to get the latest progs delivered straight to your mobile or tablet.
Pain Concern is a charity registered in Scotland SC023559.

    122. The Many Faces of Research

    122. The Many Faces of Research

    Visiting the forefront of research into pain conditions
    This edition of Airing Pain has been supported with a grant from The Mirianog Trust donated for this purpose. It was recorded at the end of April 2020, the second month of the UK’s Covid-19 lockdown. All interviews were recorded prior to the crisis.
    As research for a Covid-19 vaccine is a priority for the scientific community, this edition of Airing Pain focuses on the roles of researchers, and in particular the many disciplines that come together to increase the understanding, and therefore the management of chronic pain.
    First up, Paul Evans speaks to neurologist Claudia Sommer, whose research into fibromyalgia opens debate as to whether the condition should be treated as neuropathic pain.
    Physiotherapist David Easton then talks about the research-led ESCAPE PAIN rehabilitation exercise programme for people with osteoarthritis in their hips or knees.
    And finally, Paul visits the University of Bristol, where neuroscientist Bridget Lumb talks of the need for further research into the link between familiar contact and social interaction with chronic pain – particularly relevant at a time of social distancing – and social anthropologist Rachael Gooberman-Hill explains the role of the anthropologist in health and pain research.
    Contributors:
    Dr Claudia Sommer, Professor of Neurology at the University of Würzburg in Germany and President-Elect of the International Association for the Study of Pain
    David Easton, Physiotherapist at the Hywel Dda University Health Board in West Wales
    Dr Bridget Lumb, Professor of Neuroscience at the University of Bristol
    Dr Rachael Gooberman-Hill, Professor of Health and Anthropology and Director of the Elizabeth Blackwell Institute for Health Research at the University of Bristol.
    More information:
    Fibromyalgia Action UK - fmauk.org (https://www.fmauk.org/)
    With thanks to:
    The British Pain Society (BPS), who facilitated the interviews at their Annual Scientific Meeting in 2019 - britishpainsociety.org (https://www.britishpainsociety.org/)
    The International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP) iasp-pain.org (https://www.iasp-pain.org/) .

    • 29 min
    121. Living with Persistent Pain in Wales

    121. Living with Persistent Pain in Wales

    Discussing the future of chronic pain services across Wales
    This edition of Airing Pain has been partially funded by an educational grant from Grünenthal Limited, donated for this purpose
    In April 2019, the Minister for Health and Social Services in Wales launched the guidance document Living with Persistent Pain in Wales. Later, in December, the Chronic Pain Policy Coalition brought together some of Wales’s leading pain experts at the home of the Welsh parliament (or Senedd Cymru) in Cardiff, at an event chaired by Neil Betteridge, co-chair of the Chronic Pain Policy Coalition, a group which brings together a wide range of chronic pain stakeholders including professional bodies, patient organisations, parliamentarians and industry representatives from across the UK.
    This edition of Airing Pain was recorded live at the event, where clinicians, academics, policy-makers and people living with pain came together to discuss both the new document and the future of chronic pain services across the region.
    With thanks to the Chronic Pain Policy Coalition, the Welsh Government and the conference organisers for facilitating the recording of this event.
    Contributors:
    Neil Betteridge, Co-Chair, Chronic Pain Policy Coalition
    Dr Paul Cameron, Specialty Advisor to the Chief Medical Officer for Scotland 
    Professor Ernest Choy, Head of Rheumatology, Cardiff University
    Mary Cowern, Wales Director, Versus Arthritis
    David Easton, Physiotherapist,  Hywel Da NHS Trust
    Dr Lucy Morris, GP partner, Bellevue Practice, Newport
    Professor Ann Taylor, Professor in Medical Education, Cardiff University.
    More information:
    The Chronic Pain Policy Coalition – chronicpainpolicycoalition.com (https://chronicpainpolicycoalition.com/)  
    Versus Arthritis – http://www.versusarthritis.org 
    Welsh Pain Society – welshpainsociety.org.uk (https://www.welshpainsociety.org.uk/)
    Living with Persistent Pain in Wales (https://gov.wales/sites/default/files/publications/2019-05/living-with-persistent-pain-in-wales.pdf) PDF guidelines.

    • 41 min
    120. Osteoporosis

    120. Osteoporosis

    How we prevent, manage and diagnose this ‘silent disease’
    This edition of Airing Pain has been supported by a grant from The D’Oyly Carte Charitable Trust.
    Osteoporosis is a largely ignored condition that affects over 3 million people in the UK, with women being more at risk; a condition which, because the symptoms are difficult to notice by patients, is often referred to as the ‘silent disease’. In this edition of Airing Pain, we learn why prevention, assessment and management are key factors to deal with this condition and develop a correct model of care in the health services.
    First-off, Paul Evans speaks to Dr Emma Clark, Consultant in Rheumatology & Osteoporosis at North Bristol Trust, to find out about the causes and characteristics of osteoporosis. She discusses how osteoporosis can be ignored or misdiagnosed as osteoarthritis, as well as ways in which we can look after our bone health. Dr Clark also talks about how she is currently developing a clinical tool for primary care professionals to help them identify signs of osteoporosis when they meet with their patients.
    Paul also speaks to Sarah Leyland, Nurse Consultant at the Royal Osteoporosis Society, about the new focus on prevention, mainly in terms of lifestyle changes and developing a model of care designed to identify people who are at higher risk of osteoporotic fractures. She also describes the range of physical exercises she has developed to reduce the risk of fractures and help with pain after fractures.
    Contributors:
    Dr Emma Clark, Rheumatology & Osteoporosis Consultant at North Bristol NHS Trust
    Sarah Leyland, Osteoporosis Nurse Consultant at the Royal Osteoporosis Society. 
    More information:
    Royal Osteoporosis Society - ros.org.uk (https://theros.org.uk/)

    • 29 min
    119. Experts by Experience: Working together in pain management programmes

    119. Experts by Experience: Working together in pain management programmes

    Patient volunteers and healthcare professionals on working together in pain management programmes
    This edition of Airing Pain has been supported by a grant from the Plum Trust.
    In September, the British Pain Society’s special interest group on pain management programmes held their annual conference. A workshop entitled ‘Experts by Experience – working together in Pain Management Programmes’ was run in parallel to this. The symposium brought together patient-volunteers and healthcare professionals from four pain management centres around the UK to share their experience of working together. 
    Dr Nick Ambler, Consultant Clinical Psychologist of the North Bristol NHS Trust’s Pain Management Programme (PMP), facilitated the workshop; chairing an uplifting, frank and empowering discussion on the psychological benefit to patients and the professional value to healthcare trusts of patient-volunteers working within pain management programmes. This special extended edition of Airing Pain comes to you live from the conference, letting you sit in on the discussion.  
    Patient-volunteer Primrose Granville opens by giving a funny, relatable and inspiring testimony of how volunteering with her PMP has transformed and empowered her life and experience of pain. 
    Dr Debbie Joy, Clinical Psychologist and Clinical Lead of Pain Services for NHS Solent Trust, addresses some of the initial anxieties she had around the introduction of patient-volunteers to a clinical setting, but ultimately asserts that they are ‘definitely stronger with experts by experience by their side’.
    Pain coaches for NHS Dorset – Penny and Debbie – offer constructive advice for professionals and volunteers on how you pain coach and engage with people living with pain effectively and sympathetically. 
    The founder of Glasgow Community Pain Education Sessions – John Bremner, talks about how this model of expert by experience in action works, and how they run it ethically and effectively. Lindsay talks about how rewarding an experience it has been, volunteering as a pain trainer for this initiative, encouraging others to get involved. 
    The symposium ends with the group sharing their experiences and insights in an open floor discussion. 
    Contact your GP or relevant pain management programme if you are interested in volunteering.
     
    Contributors:
    Dr Nick Ambler, Consultant Clinical Psychologist for the North Bristol NHS Trust’s Pain Management Programme
    Primrose Granville, person living with pain and patient volunteer with the North Bristol NHS Trust Pain Management Programme
    Dr Deborah Joy, Clinical Psychologist and Clinical Lead of Pain Services for the NHS Solent Trust
    Penny and Debbie, pain coaches for the Dorset NHS Trust 
    John Bremner, person living with pain, pain trainer and founder of Glasgow Community Pain Education Sessions   
    Lindsay, person living with pain and pain trainer for Glasgow Community Pain Education Sessions
    Dr Martin Dunbar, Clinical Lead and Consultant Psychologist for NHS Great Glasgow and Clyde.
    More information:
    Airing Pain 32: Pain Management Programmes (http://painconcern.org.uk/airing-pain-programme-32-pain-management-programmes/)
    Glasgow Community Pain Education Sessions (http://painconcern.org.uk/how-we-help/pain-education-sessions-glasgow/)
    Volunteer from home with Pain Concern: http://painconcern.org.uk/get-involved/volunteer/.

    • 59 min
    118. Pain Management in Young People

    118. Pain Management in Young People

    How chronic pain in adolescence requires different pain management strategies
    In this edition of Airing Pain, Paul Evans looks at the issues concerning pain amongst adolescents, including the impact on parents. First-off, Paul speaks to Dr Jeremy Gauntlet-Gilbert, principal clinical psychologist at the Bath Centre for Pain Services, to talk about the 'end of the road' residential pain management programme the Centre has for young people from across the UK who have not had success at other institutions.
    Paul also speaks to Amyra and Taylor, who have first-hand experience of the programme, about their time in Bath. They also discuss how chronic pain has affected their personal lives, including their performance at school and in exams.
    The parents’ experience is also explored as Paul speaks to Taylor’s mum Sandra McCann and Louise Bailey, the mother of another patient. They describe how the Bath Centre for Pain Management has made a positive impact on the ability of their children to have a more regular life. Paul also discusses with Louise and Dr Gauntlet-Gilbert about the wider impact on siblings and the rest of the family.
    Dr Gauntlet-Gilbert also talks about the Centre’s commitment to transitional support for individuals between adolescence and adulthood as well as beyond. This edition concludes with the parents and young people delivering their verdict on the Bath Centre for Pain Services’ programme. One that indicates it is a very hard but rewarding process, with the young people clearly finding enjoyment in their time there.
    Contributors:
    Dr Jeremy Gauntlet-Gilbert, Principal Clinical Psychologist at the Bath Centre for Pain Services
    Louise Bailey, parent
    Sandra McCann, parent
    Amyra, young person
    Taylor, young person.
    More information:
    Bath Centre for Pain Services: www.bathcentreforpainservices.nhs.uk/

    • 29 min
    117. Patients as Research Partners

    117. Patients as Research Partners

    Involving patients in researching their own condition – it seems logical, so why is it not more common? Listen as Paul Evans discusses the benefits, challenges and future of including patients as research partners. With professionals, patients and policy leaders.
    This edition was facilitated by the British Pain Society and recorded at their Annual Scientific Meeting 2019. 
    In this edition of Airing Pain, Paul Evans investigates the potential for patients to play an integral role in research, alongside the professionals. Through discussions with patients John and Mark both of whom are part of research groups, he sheds light on the importance of patients shaping the research and treatment of their own condition. From patients being included in directing their own treatment plan to actually influencing the direction of original scientific research, there are many benefits to their involvement.
    Louise Trewern, a member of the BPS Patient Liaison Committee, speaks of her journey from coming off opioids to working with Doctors in order to help others in similar situations. She highlights need to break down the ‘language’ barrier between professionals and patients. 
    Margaret Whitehead and Julie Ashworth explore how the BPS and the University of Keele, respectively, are encouraging patient involvement. Specifically, Julie talks about the University of Keele’s efforts to improve primary care with their programme PROMPPT. 
    Finally, Paul discusses the future work required to challenge the “doctor knows better” attitude excluding patients from influencing the treatment of their condition for future generations.
    Contributors:
    John Norton, patient
    Mark Farmer, patient
    Louise Trewern, member of the BPS Patient Liaison Committee
    Margaret Whitehead, past co-chair of the BPS Patient Liaison Committee
    Julie Ashworth, Senior Lecturer University of Keele and Honorary Consultant at the Community Pain Service with Midlands Partnership Foundation Trust.
    More information:
    INVOLVE, National Institute for Health Research, https://www.invo.org.uk/
    National Voices, https://www.nationalvoices.org.uk/
    Citizen Science Association, https://www.citizenscience.org/
    BPS Patient Liaison Committee https://www.britishpainsociety.org/about/bps-committees/
    Proactive clinical Review of patients taking Opioid Medicines long-term for persistent Pain led by clinical Pharmacists in primary care Teams (PROMPPT) https://www.promppt.co.uk/.

    • 29 min

Customer Reviews

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7 Ratings

Leneux ,

Required listening for chronic pain

Helpful and informative podcast talking about the issues of living with chronic pain. Has really helped me.

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