17 episodes

Welcome to Apple Science Profiles. In this lineup of podcast stories, you'll learn how scientists are using Mac technology throughout their workflow - for computation, visualization, analysis, and general productivity. Viewpoints from all walks of science will be discussed - from medicine to paleontology, bioinformatics to physics, archaeology to oceanography. Find out how researchers are accelerating their time to insight and discovery using Apple hardware, the Mac OS X platform, and advanced applications made for Mac.

Apple Science Profiles Apple Inc.

    • Natural Sciences

Welcome to Apple Science Profiles. In this lineup of podcast stories, you'll learn how scientists are using Mac technology throughout their workflow - for computation, visualization, analysis, and general productivity. Viewpoints from all walks of science will be discussed - from medicine to paleontology, bioinformatics to physics, archaeology to oceanography. Find out how researchers are accelerating their time to insight and discovery using Apple hardware, the Mac OS X platform, and advanced applications made for Mac.

    • video
    Author Claire Nouvian

    Author Claire Nouvian

    This Apple Science podcast features Claire Nouvian, a French journalist who became fascinated with the deep-sea after seeing a museum exhibit in 2001. She wanted to see and learn more, but soon discovered how few materials were available. This motivated her to collect the countless photos she knew must be scattered in the computers of deep-sea scientists around the globe. Nouvian amassed over 6,000 photos of deep-sea creatures that required navigation and manipulation. Nouvian appreciates the simplicity of the Mac operating system. To process her photo library, she needed only a PowerBook and a collection of external hard drives. To review photos, she used Apple Preview, and to manipulate photographs she turned to Adobe Photoshop. Her publisher connected her with graphic designer Anne-Marie Bourgeois, who works exclusively with Macs:three Power Macs and two PowerBooks. The two easily exchanged files as they produced the book. Nouvian sent photo files and Bourgeois laid them out in book format using Quark XPress, then converted them to PDF files for Nouvian's review. The countless photos that were collected were compiled into a book, The Deep, which has just been released.

    • 8 min
    • video
    PathCon Laboratories

    PathCon Laboratories

    This Apple Science podcast features CEO Brian Shelton and Director of Technology Joseph Canady of PathCon Laboratories. From two 100% Mac computer based facilities, researchers fight against pathogenic menaces such as MRSA, Legionella, Anthrax, and virulent new strains of influenza. Their Mac-based workflow includes multiple MacBook Pros, Mac Pros, iMacs and Xserve servers. Proprietary software provides PathCon’s team of top scientists the tools to identify and prevent the spread of dangerous pathogens. With screening, analysis, and custom designed software, they detect and intercept these and other microbiological adversaries before they become a threat.

    • 7 min
    Dr. Fernando Cucchietti

    Dr. Fernando Cucchietti

    This Apple Science podcast features Dr. Fernando Cucchietti, scientist at Los Alamos National Laboratory who credits his presentation skills in giving him an advantage when applying for grants—and even in helping him get his job. Cucchietti uses a combination of tools to build graphics for his presentations, ultimately importing and organizing his files in Keynote, part of Apple’s iWork ’08 suite of productivity applications. Dr. Cucchietti noticed that the system never crashed. He started doing short simulations on it and found he never had to reboot. Before switching to Apple technology, he used Linux. His favorite open-source applications and programs were written to work with any flavor of UNIX. In the event that he or his colleagues ever want to use Linux-specific applications or do any Linux development, it’s easy to install and run Linux on a Mac.

    • 7 min
    • video
    Building A Better Pre-Clinical PET Imaging System

    Building A Better Pre-Clinical PET Imaging System

    This Apple Science podcast features Professor Tom Lewellen in the Department of Radiology’s Nuclear Medicine Division at the University of Washington. He and his team are designing Mac-based imaging systems that give investigators a closer look at metabolic functions in a mouse that weighs about an ounce. The primary design goal of these pre-clinical research tools is higher resolution images. The ultimate goals are better understanding of disease, more effective therapy, and better outcomes from patient care. The Physics Group is tasked with providing the Department of Radiology with superior imaging tools. The technology used in their development workflow includes 15 MacBook Pro and six iMac systems to design circuit boards, write code, and simulate scanner systems under development. They run simulations on an eight-core Apple Xserve cluster with seven terabytes of RAID storage. An 8-core Mac Pro with two Apple Cinema Displays is used exclusively for viewing scanner images with OsiriX, an open-source, Mac-only, DICOM viewer. No technology out there could give them the kind of resolution they need. So they use the Mac to design, build and run positron emission tomography – or PET - scanners that push the resolution envelope. Off-the-shelf hardware components couldn’t provide the performance they need, so they started from scratch, using the Mac to design hardware and write code. Asked why we they like the Mac better, their answer is that it’s easier to use.

    • 10 min
    • video
    MIT Media Laboratory: The Human Speechome Project

    MIT Media Laboratory: The Human Speechome Project

    This Apple Science podcast features MIT’s Deb Roy, whose Human Speechome Project at the MIT Media Lab is exploring how children learn language. In its observation phase, the project will archive 200,000 hours of audio and video recordings, nearly a petabyte of data. Macintosh Xserves and Xserve RAIDs, interfaced with other computing platforms, collect, process, and store the vast dataset. TotalRecall, a Mac OS X-based application being developed at MIT, is the central tool for navigating and making sense of it all. With his research team at the MIT Media Lab, computing tools from Apple, and offering himself and his family as test subjects, Roy is developing that technology.

    • 10 min
    • video
    Digital Medical Imaging for Pets

    Digital Medical Imaging for Pets

    This Apple Science podcast features Michael Broome, DVM, a principal at Advanced Veterinary Medical Imaging in Tustin, California. He was unhappy with the hardware and software costs of commercially available image viewing systems. He wanted a Picture Archive Communication System that would enable him to share DICOM images on high-quality viewing stations across his network; reduce the costs of viewing; and provide a reliable, no-downtime central archive. The practice used Apple technology to implement a Mac-Based SecureVault PACS solution running on an Apple Xserve RAID. DICOM images are archived in SecureVault and viewed in OsiriX on iMac and Power Mac systems across the AVMI network. The combination of the Mac and OsiriX gives AVMI a powerful, efficient solution at a very attractive cost.

    • 9 min

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