14 episodes

Welcome to the Barbican's ScreenTalks Archive where we dust off the tapes and release rarely heard recordings of live conversations with some of the world's leading filmmakers and film fans from across the decades. 


We curate conversations with important voices in the cinema industry and beyond, to learn more about the film and unpack the issues it raises. See upcoming ScreenTalk events at the Barbican: https://www.barbican.org.uk/screentalks 

ScreenTalks Archive Barbican Centre

    • TV & Film
    • 4.5, 16 Ratings

Welcome to the Barbican's ScreenTalks Archive where we dust off the tapes and release rarely heard recordings of live conversations with some of the world's leading filmmakers and film fans from across the decades. 


We curate conversations with important voices in the cinema industry and beyond, to learn more about the film and unpack the issues it raises. See upcoming ScreenTalk events at the Barbican: https://www.barbican.org.uk/screentalks 

    ScreenTalks Archive / Sir Richard Attenborough on Brighton Rock

    ScreenTalks Archive / Sir Richard Attenborough on Brighton Rock

    In the final episode from our ScreenTalks Archive, Sir Richard Attenborough talks to Quentin Falk about the film adaptation of Graham Greene’s novel, 'Brighton Rock'. He reveals what motivated him to move behind the lens, directing hits like 'Oh What A Lovely War' and 'Gandhi'. And he shares failsafe advice given by David Lean on the set of his very first feature, 'In Which We Serve'. When Attenborough died in 2014, at the age of 90, he’d amassed an extraordinary range of cinematic experiences, both in Britain and Hollywood. And it’s the benefit of all this filmic wisdom that you’re about to hear… 
     
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    • 42 min
    ScreenTalks Archive / Robert Altman on Gosford Park

    ScreenTalks Archive / Robert Altman on Gosford Park

    After a stint as a co-pilot in the US Air Force, Robert Altman moved to California, deciding to enter the world of filmmaking on a whim. Starting as a director-for-hire on film and television in the nineteen fifties, Altman didn’t become a household name until 1970 with the release of Korean War satire MASH. The film’s success led to a string of nearly forty mould-breaking movies, in every conceivable genre, often featuring sprawling ensemble casts. In this conversation from 2002, Robert Altman talks to film and TV producer David Thompson about his British period drama Gosford Park. 
     
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    • 42 min
    ScreenTalks Archive / B. Ruby Rich on Queer Cinema

    ScreenTalks Archive / B. Ruby Rich on Queer Cinema

    New Queer Cinema champion, feminist film critic, educator and agitator, B. Ruby Rich introduces Sara Gomez’s 1974 film, De Cierta Manera, a study of the interplay of race, class and gender. The film also provides a jumping off point for Rich to discuss her developing thoughts on Queer representation in cinema, to explore how online viewing platforms are changing film, and to reflect on the continuing influence of her book, Chick Flicks
     
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    • 40 min
    ScreenTalks Archive / Asif Kapadia on Senna

    ScreenTalks Archive / Asif Kapadia on Senna

    Hackney-born Asif Kapadia started out as the director of critically-lauded art films such as The Warrior and Far North. However, his career really went into overdrive in 2010, when he turned his hand to documentary film-making with Senna. Focusing on the life and death of Brazilian Formula 1 legend Ayrton Senna, Kapadia’s remarkable biopic managed to break entirely new ground. Not only was it a documentary that proved extremely lucrative at the box office - it was also a sports film that even the most sport-averse could enjoy.
     
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    • 25 min
    ScreenTalks Archive / Kasi Lemmons on Eve's Bayou

    ScreenTalks Archive / Kasi Lemmons on Eve's Bayou

    Kasi Lemmons began her career playing supporting roles such as Jodie Foster’s roommate in 'Silence Of The Lambs' and Nicolas Cage’s victim in 'Vampire’s Kiss'. Frustrated by the limited opportunities available for black actresses in Hollywood, she started to write, using time between auditions to pen short stories and scenes for friends to perform in acting classes. In the latest from our ScreenTalks Archive, Lemmons discusses her debut film - Eve’s Bayou, widely viewed as a classic of contemporary black cinema, and cited as an influence on films like 'Beasts of the Southern Wild' and Beyonce’s visual album 'Lemonade'.
     
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    • 33 min
    ScreenTalks Archive: Park Chan-wook

    ScreenTalks Archive: Park Chan-wook

    One of the most well-known directors to come out of South Korea, Park Chan Wook made his name internationally with a string of bleak, brutal films released in the early noughties, Sympathy for My Vengeance, Old Boy and Lady Vengeance - dubbed The Vengeance Trilogy by critics.  But in this ScreenTalk from 2008, Park Chan-wook talks to film journalist Damon Wise about a  very different feature – the romantic comedy, I’m A Cyborg, But That’s OK.  
     
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    • 32 min

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5
16 Ratings

16 Ratings

graecam ,

Excellent and insightful

Great guests and always excellent questions from Ben. A good podcast to dip in and out of and definitely encourages me to see films I wouldn’t normally bother with. Well worth subscribing

Vicsyz ,

Great interviews

I kind of pick and choose which interview I am going to listen to depending on who is the guest but when I do listen I love it

Bozwina ,

Interesting and I informative interviews

I really love this podcast. Ben Eshmade is such a good interviewer. He clearly knows his stuff and he always asks interesting questions I would t have thought to ask, which gives you unexpected and interesting answers. If there's a film out that I'm thinking of seeing, I'm always happy when I discover the director or star (or both) have been interviewed for the podcast. Ben will always get the best out of the interview and I'll always learn something. That's the best thing I take away from listening- I always learn something. My only teeny weeny qualm would be the production or the sound of the mic. It doesn't sound as clean as some others I've heard. But that really is just me being picky. If you like your podcasts intelligent and informative, have a listen. Enjoy!

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