27 episodes

Want to discover more about how animals navigate their environment, find food, court mates and raise young? Then subscribe to the Behavioural Ecology and Evolution Podcast: The Beepcast! Every month Dr. Hannah Rowland of Cambridge University & ZSL brings you the newest, most fascinating research on the evolved behaviour of animals. Featuring interviews with emerging and established experts in animal behaviour from all over the world.

The Behavioural Ecology and Evolution Podcast (the Beepcast) noreply@blogger.com (Unknown)

    • Natural Sciences
    • 5.0 • 5 Ratings

Want to discover more about how animals navigate their environment, find food, court mates and raise young? Then subscribe to the Behavioural Ecology and Evolution Podcast: The Beepcast! Every month Dr. Hannah Rowland of Cambridge University & ZSL brings you the newest, most fascinating research on the evolved behaviour of animals. Featuring interviews with emerging and established experts in animal behaviour from all over the world.

    Oct 17: Iain Couzin's Scientific Spark, why do deer in Japan bow, and why are some plant nectars bitter?

    Oct 17: Iain Couzin's Scientific Spark, why do deer in Japan bow, and why are some plant nectars bitter?

    This month I meet some very polite deer who have a special way of asking for food. I discover why some plant nectars contain poisonous toxins. And in the scientific spark, I talk to Iain Couzin from the Max Planck Department of Collective Behaviour. Iain tells me what sparked his interest in becoming a scientist, and how, if his teachers had had their way, he might have been doing something entirely different. 

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    Feeding a sika deer in Nara Park, Japan


    Today I met the sika deer of #Nara #Japan who have learned to bow for treats. Seems to be a #sociallytransmitted #behaviour pic.twitter.com/jTedabe2hW
    — Dr. Hannah Rowland (@HannahMRowland) October 1, 2017 Quicklinks:

    Variation and social influence of bowing behavior by sika deer (Cervus nippon) in the journal Ethology
    Patty Jone' lab webpage at Bowdoin
    Patty's paper on the consequences of toxic secondary compounds in nectar for mutualist bees and antagonist butterflies.
    Iain Couzin's Collective Behaviour Department

    Sept 2015: Kate Umbers, burying beetle parental care, and tasteless monkey thieves

    Sept 2015: Kate Umbers, burying beetle parental care, and tasteless monkey thieves

    This month I find out that animals should be careful when choosing a mate, picking a partner that matches them in quality, else they might face an early grave! I discover that a mutation in a taste receptor gene has helped macaques in Japan to become thieves. And in the scientific spark, I talk to Kate Umbers from the University of Western Sydney, who works on a variety of topics, mainly related to understanding the mechanisms, functions and evolution of biological colouration. She tells me what sparked her interest in becoming a scientist. 

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    A Japanese Macaque munching on fruit (image: https://www.flickr.com/photos/gingiber/)


    Quicklinks:

    Becky Kilner's Burying Beetle Lab 
    Burying Beetle paper in eLife 
    Japanese Macaque taste receptor paper in PLOS One
    Kate Umbers' lab page 

    Aug 2015: ZSL Scientist Patricia Brekke, polar bear welfare at Yorkshire Wildlife Park, and self-medicating ants

    Aug 2015: ZSL Scientist Patricia Brekke, polar bear welfare at Yorkshire Wildlife Park, and self-medicating ants

    This month I hear how a wildlife park in Yorkshire is providing the perfect retirement setting for an old polar bear. I discover that social insects make trips to natures pharmacy to fight infections. And in the scientific spark, I talk to Patricia Brekke from the Zoological Society of London, who tells me about her research on the endangered new Zealand bird the Hihi, and what inspired her to become a scientist.

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    Victor is Yorkshire Wildlife Park's polar bear. 
    He is one of the biggest polar bears in Europe, weighing 500Kg

    Quicklinks:

    Yorkshire Wildlife Park's Project Polar Bear

    Ants medicate to fight disease in the journal Evolution

    Patricia Brekke from The Institute of Zoology at the Zoological Society of London

    July 2015: Johan Nilson, sea ducks, and horse facial expressions

    July 2015: Johan Nilson, sea ducks, and horse facial expressions

    This month I find out about sea ducks who enjoy a rather sophisticated fast food diet of mussels. I discover that horses horse around with lots of different facial expressions. And in the scientific spark, I talk to Johan Nilsson from the university of Lund, who researches the physiology and evolutionary ecology of birds.

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    What does this face say?!


    Quicklinks:

    EquiFACS: The Equine Facial Action Coding System

    Elisabeth Varennes' research gate page

    Johan Nilsson's research page

    June 2015: Lucy Nash from OUP, Dottybacks change colour to hide from prey, and moths that slow their brains down

    June 2015: Lucy Nash from OUP, Dottybacks change colour to hide from prey, and moths that slow their brains down

    In this episode I discover that some species of coral reef fish change colour, and they do this to grab a sneaky meal! I also find out how moths find flowers in the dark. And in the scientific spark I talk to Lucy Nash, who is commissioning editor for science at Oxford University Press.

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    Copyright © N Justin Marshall/Courtesy of University of Basel

    Quicklinks:
    Will Feeney's webpage

    Fabio Cortesi's webpage

    The dottyback paper in Current Biology

    Hovering hawkmoth paper in science

    May 2015: Marie Herbenstein, deception and disguise of orchid mantis and owl butterflies with @jamohanlon @JohannaMappes and @SebaDeBona

    May 2015: Marie Herbenstein, deception and disguise of orchid mantis and owl butterflies with @jamohanlon @JohannaMappes and @SebaDeBona

    This month I’m joined by special guest James O’Hanlon from the Australian museum in Sydney for a deception and disguise special. James tells me about his PhD research on mantids that trick bees by mimicking flowers - or do they?! And we discuss a new paper showing that butterfly eyepsots might really be mimicking the eyes of a predator’s own predator. In the Scientific spark I talk to Marie Herbenstein, from Macquarie University in Sydney, who tells me that things might have not gone the way they have if she’d chosen a different research project!

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    The owl butterfly Photo Credit: 1funny.com


    Quicklinks:

    James O'Hanlon's webpage

    Predator mimicry, not conspicuousness, explains the efficacy of butterfly eyespots

    Marie Herbenstein's webpage

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
5 Ratings

5 Ratings

SadCorgi ,

New season. Yeah!!

Always love this podcast. I like how it is about real scientific research rather than just compilation of animal facts. Definitely a podcast for serious naturalist.

Michael Mole ,

Add it to your podcasts

Anyone interested in the natural world will enjoy the depth of information on offer here. Well presented too.

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