22 episodes

Between the Liner Notes is an award winning documentary-style podcast about music, why it is the way it is and how it got to be that way. Each episode highlights a piece of lost, forgotten or obscured music history. This show is hosted by Matthew Billy and produced by the Goat Rodeo podcast network.
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Between the Liner Notes Goat Rodeo

    • Music
    • 5.0 • 4 Ratings

Between the Liner Notes is an award winning documentary-style podcast about music, why it is the way it is and how it got to be that way. Each episode highlights a piece of lost, forgotten or obscured music history. This show is hosted by Matthew Billy and produced by the Goat Rodeo podcast network.
See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    Introducing Bleeped - A New Show About Censorship

    Introducing Bleeped - A New Show About Censorship

    Bleeped is a new podcast about censorship and the people who stand up to it. Coming June 18th.
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    • 1 min
    21: Stone

    21: Stone

    Joe Stone is the youngest son of the founder of TK Records, Henry Stone, and wanted to follow in his father's footsteps. Henry, however, refused to allow any of his children to work in the music industry. Listen as Joe chronicles how he convinced his father to take a chance on him.
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    • 50 min
    20: Take Me Out to the Ball Game

    20: Take Me Out to the Ball Game

    If you attend a baseball game today, during the seventh inning stretch you’re likely to hear the entire stadium sing, “Take Me Out to the Ball Game.” We’ve grown so accustomed to singing the song during ballgames that it feels like the ritual has been around forever, but if it wasn’t for a device called the magic lantern, first-wave feminism, and a sportscaster named Harry Caray, our familiar custom wouldn’t exist. This is the story of how a simple Tin Pan Alley ditty embedded itself in baseball tradition.
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    • 38 min
    19: Discophobia (Disco Part 2)

    19: Discophobia (Disco Part 2)

    1978 set the record for most album sales with disco surpassing rock & roll for the first time ever. Industry insiders predicted the following year would continue to break sales records, but an economic downturn and a fierce anti-disco backlash proved their predictions false. This is the story of how disco became a four-letter-word.
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    • 28 min
    18: The Dance Floor Doesn't Lie (Disco Part 1)

    18: The Dance Floor Doesn't Lie (Disco Part 1)

    In 1970, two deejays discovered they had the ability to take the dance floor on a journey by playing records back-to-back, continuously throughout the night. Soon clubs all over the world adopted this style of deejaying, and a new culture and music genre called "disco" emerged. Eight years later, in 1978, disco was the best selling music genre in the world. This is the story of how it got there.
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    • 39 min
    17: The Colored American Opera Company

    17: The Colored American Opera Company

    The Colored American Opera Company was born at St. Augustine’s Catholic Church — the first all-black church in the nation’s capitol — where an Italian priest invited a white Spanish American veteran of the U.S. Marine Band, and teacher of march legend John Philip Sousa, to teach a French style of opéra bouffe to an African American choir. In doing so, in 1873, just a decade after President Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation, together, they created the first American opera company — black or white — in the nation. Listen as Shelley Brown, producer and former artistic director of the Strathmore theater in Bethesda, Maryland, and Patrick Warfield, a professor of musicology at the University of Maryland and author of Making the March King: John Philip Sousa's Washington Years,1854-1893 discuss this hidden American story.
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    • 26 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
4 Ratings

4 Ratings

TobiasF87 ,

Motivated and informative

Really nice podcast this - seemless editing between interviews and the enthusiastic host. Well worth a listen.

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