50 episodes

Beyond Japan is an interdisciplinary podcast which invites you to take a look at the broad reach of Japanese Studies both within and beyond Japan. The series is hosted by Oliver Moxham (@OllieMox on Twitter), researcher of Japanese war heritage, and brought to you by the Centre for Japanese Studies at the University of East Anglia in collaboration with the Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Cultures.

Beyond Japan with Oliver Moxham Centre for Japanese Studies at UEA

    • Education
    • 3.8 • 4 Ratings

Beyond Japan is an interdisciplinary podcast which invites you to take a look at the broad reach of Japanese Studies both within and beyond Japan. The series is hosted by Oliver Moxham (@OllieMox on Twitter), researcher of Japanese war heritage, and brought to you by the Centre for Japanese Studies at the University of East Anglia in collaboration with the Sainsbury Institute for the Study of Japanese Arts and Cultures.

    [S2E3] 🔞 Studying Pornography with Maiko Kodaka

    [S2E3] 🔞 Studying Pornography with Maiko Kodaka

    This week we are joined by Maiko Kodaka, PhD candidate at the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS) at the University of London, the challenges that come with researching such a contentious subject and the insights we can gain from it. Maiko will also share her research on josei-muke (女性向け) pornography, or “porn for women”, being produced in the Japanese Adult Video industry and how this new genre has challenged mainstream pornography shot for the heterosexual male gaze.

    Keen to know more?

    Website of Erika Lust, advocate of feminist pornography 🔞

    Journal of Porn Studies 🔞

    Image and audio credits

    Intro-outro audio: jasonszklarek / MotionElements.com

    [L] Shunga by Kitagawa Utamaro.

    [R] "Pixelated Pornography" by thedescrier is licensed under CC BY 2.0

    Copyright © 2021 Oliver Moxham, ℗ 2021 Oliver Moxham. May be freely distributed in a classroom setting.


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    • 29 min
    [S2E2] 👐 Power Spots with Caleb Carter

    [S2E2] 👐 Power Spots with Caleb Carter

    This week we are joined by Caleb Carter, Assistant Professor of Japanese Religions and Buddhist Studies at Kyushu University, to discuss power spots, or pawā-supotto as they are known in Japan. Caleb walks us through how a global movement which began in 1960s USA and UK claiming the healing energies at key sites of natural beauty came to be embraced in Japan, peaking in popularity as recently as 2010. We explore how this communal term has been applied at Shinto shrines and Buddhist temples to a mixed reception from religious authorities, as well as unexpected uses of the term at heritage sites of a more grisly nature.

    Image and audio credits

    Intro-outro audio: jasonszklarek / MotionElements.com

    [L] & [R] Visitors drawing on healing energies from power spots. Photographs provided by Caleb Carter.

    Copyright © 2021 Oliver Moxham, ℗ 2021 Oliver Moxham. May be freely distributed in a classroom setting.


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    • 36 min
    [S2E1] 👂 Reinterpreting Difficult Heritage: Mimizuka, "Hill of Ears" with Oliver Moxham

    [S2E1] 👂 Reinterpreting Difficult Heritage: Mimizuka, "Hill of Ears" with Oliver Moxham

    Welcome back to the second series of Beyond Japan! This week the tables are turned as Professor Simon Kaner, Director of the Sainsbury Institute, interviews host Oliver Moxham on the topic of his recently completed master’s thesis, Reinterpreting Difficult Heritage. The case study of Oliver's research is Mimizuka, the Hill of Ears, a burial mound containing tens of thousands of pickled ears and noses taken from Joseon Korean and Ming Chinese soldiers in Toyotomi Hideyoshi’s 16th century invasion of Korea, the Imjin War. Located in a tourist hub of Kyoto, Higashiyama district, his research explored how the language barrier limits international engagement at the site and how analysing multilingual Google Maps reviews reveals how tourist stakeholders in its war history engage with it and their desire, or lack of, for it to be interpreted by others. Oliver also talks to Simon about the challenges and benefits of taking a digital approach to ethnographic research and offers some reflections on the first series of Beyond Japan.

    Image and audio credits

    Intro-outro audio: jasonszklarek / MotionElements.com

    [L] A man dressed in traditional Korean clothing performs in front of Mimizuka's mound. Source: Noriyasu Hagimoto

    [R] Excerpt from an extreme Japanese-language Google Maps review on Mimizuka. Source: 湯浅洋一

    Copyright © 2021 Oliver Moxham, ℗ 2021 Oliver Moxham. May be freely distributed in a classroom setting.


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    • 29 min
    [S1E46] Gardens of War Memory with Prof Toshio Watanabe

    [S1E46] Gardens of War Memory with Prof Toshio Watanabe

    For the series finale, this week we are joined by Toshio Watanabe, Professor of Japanese Art and Cultural Heritage at the Sainsbury Institute, to discuss gardens of war memory, going over his latest project of transnational gardens across the Pacific with ties to the Asia-Pacific War (1937-45). Toshio invites us to consider gardens as spaces of memory and healing, but also as reminders of colonialism past and present across former territories of the Japanese empire throughout Asia. We also look at gardens as peopled places, looking at the motives for visitors coming to these places: do they come for the memories or just to enjoy nature?

    For a comprehensive list of Japanese time periods, please see Japanese History: A Timeline of Periods and Events

    Toshio's recommendations for Japanese gardens:

    War in Japan


    Yasukuni gardens dedicated to Japanese military war dead, Tokyo
    Chidorigafuchi National Cemetery for Japanese war dead, both military & civilian, Tokyo
    Kaiten Memorial Museum, Ōzushima

    Peace in Japan


    Hiroshima and Nagasaki Peace Parks
    Aoto Peace Park, Tokyo
    Fukuchiyama Peace Park, Kyoto Prefecture

    War memory of a place still under colonial conditions


    Various parks of Okinawa

    Image and audio credits

    Intro audio: hase-dera, kamakura, japan - garden path by OR poiesis

    Outro audio: jasonszklarek / MotionElements.com

    [L] Nagasaki Peace Park monument by MShades is licensed under CC BY-ND 2.0

    [R] Sakura at Chidorigafuchi Park by Yoshikazu TAKADA is licensed under CC BY 2.0



    Copyright © 2021 Oliver Moxham, ℗ 2021 Oliver Moxham. May be freely distributed in a classroom setting.


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    • 54 min
    [S1E45] The Ainu in Japan with Amanda McGuire

    [S1E45] The Ainu in Japan with Amanda McGuire

    This week we are joined by Amanda McGuire, PhD candidate at the University of East Anglia, to discuss the Ainu in Japan, exploring their historical and contemporary relationship with the peoples of mainland Japan and what the withdrawal of the Ainu dance from the Tokyo 2020 Olympics Opening Ceremony says about the theme of "unity in Japan".

    For a comprehensive list of Japanese time periods, please see Japanese History: A Timeline of Periods and Events

    Image and audio credits

    Intro-outro audio: tonkori suite by Yirara Hanawo, improvised music with the yonkori, a musical instrument used by the Ainu.

    [L] "Ainu group dancing tutorial (11)" by avlxyz is licensed under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

    [R] "Espaço Tokyo 2020" by Secretaria Especial do Esporte is licensed under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0



    Copyright © 2021 Oliver Moxham, ℗ 2021 Oliver Moxham. May be freely distributed in a classroom setting.


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    • 21 min
    [S1E44] Prehistoric Tragedy: The Oldest Shark Attack Victim with J. Alyssa White

    [S1E44] Prehistoric Tragedy: The Oldest Shark Attack Victim with J. Alyssa White

    This week we are joined by J. Alyssa White, PhD candidate in Archaeology at the University of Oxford, to discuss the prehistoric tragedy of the world’s oldest shark attack victim. The 3,000-year-old remains of Tsukumo No. 24 were first excavated in Okayama prefecture in the early 20th century covered in hundreds of small cuts to the bone which had baffled archaeologists until now after Alyssa, along with a team of researchers, compared the damage to that of contemporary shark attack victims. Join us as we explore the final moments of Tsukumo No. 24 in amazing detail.

    Read Alyssa's article: 3000-year-old shark attack victim from Tsukumo shell-mound, Okayama, Japan

    For a comprehensive list of Japanese time periods, please see Japanese History: A Timeline of Periods and Events

    Image and audio credits

    Intro clip: tiger sharks by dinger154 is licensed under the Creative Commons 0 License

    Intro-outro audio: jasonszklarek / MotionElements.com

    [L] Excavation photo - Original excavation photograph of Tsukumo No. 24, courtesy of the Laboratory of Physical Anthropology, Kyoto University

    [R] "IMG_1794bcra Tiger Shark (Galeocerdo cuvier)" by Kevin Bryant, DMD is licensed under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0



    Copyright © 2021 Oliver Moxham, ℗ 2021 Oliver Moxham. May be freely distributed in a classroom setting.


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    • 22 min

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