5 episodes

The field of neuroscience and brain health is rapidly expanding, and keeping on top of it is difficult even for doctors, let alone the public. The hosts of the Brain Hub podcast, Carlo Rinaudo and Matthew Holmes, distill this information into easily digestible bites to give you the latest information on improving your brain performance and longevity.

Brain Hub Podcast Brain Hub Podcast

    • Medicine

The field of neuroscience and brain health is rapidly expanding, and keeping on top of it is difficult even for doctors, let alone the public. The hosts of the Brain Hub podcast, Carlo Rinaudo and Matthew Holmes, distill this information into easily digestible bites to give you the latest information on improving your brain performance and longevity.

    Dizziness and Vertigo – Common Causes and Treatments

    Dizziness and Vertigo – Common Causes and Treatments

    Welcome to Brainhub Podcast where you will discover the top news and tips on keeping your brain healthy.

    Hello and welcome to the Brainhub Podcast I am Matthew Holmes and with me today is Dr. Carlo Rinaudo a chiropractor and the owner of Brain Hub Clinics in Sydney.

    Matthew: Good day Carlo, how are you going?

    Carlo: Good day Matt, good to be here today.

    Matthew: Indeed.  So what has been happening latterly I hear that Brain Hub has moved premises and you have no got two locations in Sydney where people can come along and see you.

    Carlo: That is correct, since our last podcast Matt I have since left the previous location in Annadale and now set up two very central locations scattered throughout Sydney, one in Leichhardtand the other one in Gladesville.  So I have been practising here for almost seven, nine years now. So I have got my roots firm in this area for both where I live, where I studied, where I went to school, where my kids attend school and where I have worked for the last seven, nine years as well as from the Lower North Shore of Sydney where it seems we have a number of patients that travel from the Northern beaches or from the North West that come to see us.  So at these two locations we are offering the same services, the same dizziness, balance and sort of treatments for those neurological based conditions.  We are offering all the services that we were offering previously and we have expanded to incorporate the services of massage therapist, acupuncturists, medical doctors, psychologists are all part of our team.  So I would say the move is great for our patients, we are able to offer more services from our central locations.

    Matthew: Yes, that sounds great, certainly with the psychology and so forth with dealing with a lot of those vestibular cases and balance cases that can certainly have an aspect particularly with anxiety.  So that probably ties in quite well with what we are going to talk about today.  Basically we got scheduled to go into a bit more deeply about dizziness and obviously with that vertigo, dizziness and vertigo are obviously very common conditions that you see a lot of in your practice Carlo, do you want to tell us a bit about what dizziness is and say how it differs from vertigo and things like that?

    Carlo: Sure, I would say out of the conditions that our clinics sees dizziness is certainly the most common and the most prevalence symptom that people call us up and seek some help with.  First of all dizziness is often very loosely described, people will come into the office saying that they have dizziness, and they will describe it in some way when we ask them a few more questions as to can you describe it a little bit further, when does is happen, what exactly do you experience, what are you not experiencing, the definition of dizziness comes out a little bit more.  Dizziness is one of those poorly defined conditions that we often need to tease out a little further. So I often say that the differences between dizziness and vertigo is this, is that dizziness is always described as a perception, it is a very none specific term but it is described as an unsteadiness, a light headiness or a giddiness rather than one perceiving that they are moving.  So it is more of an impaired or altered sensation of themselves, not necessarily a sensation that they are moving.  That sensation of movements is typically described as vertigo or as an impairment or a sensation of poor orientation is often described as dizziness and we often want to tease that out a little further as the clinician because the causes of it and obviously how we can help people with it varies quite considerably. So we certainly want to ask these questions as something that we teach in our cause to practitioners is to really elicit the correct diagnosis from a number of questions that we ask clients.

    Matthew:

    • 18 min
    Using Vagal Stimulation to Treat Brain and Gut Problems

    Using Vagal Stimulation to Treat Brain and Gut Problems

    Welcome to Brainhub Podcast where you will discover the top news and tips on keeping your brain healthy.

    Hello and welcome to the Brainhub Podcast my name is Matthew Holmes and with me today is Dr. Carlo Rinaudo a chiropractor and the owner of Brain Hub Clinics in Sydney.

    Matthew: G’day Carlo, how are you doing?

    Carlo: G’day Matt, glad to be here.

    Matthew: You sound you are a bit under the weather I believe it was a fairly big weekend in terms of some conferences that you were speaking at and so forth.  Apologies to the listeners today, Carlo was saying he is a bit bunged up, but you want to tell us a little bit about what you have been up to and what has been going on?

    Carlo: Yes, thanks Matt.  I apologise to the listeners to my very nasal and stuffy voice.  It has been a busy few months, most our listeners are aware that I have been presenting a series of seminars to practitioners across Australia on the vestibular and balance therapy which has been extraordinarily well received and we still have got some more planned for Perth, and Tasmania as well which is fantastic.  But over the weekend I was very fortunate to present to several hundred people practitioners, patients and parents at the international forum held by MINDD which is a rights initiative, it has been around now for about ten years, set up to help parents and adults and children and practitioners learn more about various chronic and nutritional, metabolic, immune, neurological and development disorders that unfortunately plaque many of us.

    Matthew: Indeed.  What did you chat about when you were speaking there?

    Carlo: I was very fortunate to be part of the teaching of a faculty there over the weekend.  My talk was on a problem that most people there were very familiar with which relates to gut function.  The direction which I took this was quite different than what most people are probably used to or exposed to.  My talk was on a brain based or a top down approach in helping people’s gut function, immunity and inflammatory conditions.  Whereas most of them have been exposed to very directed care to the gut through naturopathic or integrated medicine or other forms of health structures in getting the body to work to help the body, whereas my talk was get the brain to work better to help the gut to work better.  And it was quite novel for a lot of them and it was really well received.  I had a lot of parents and practitioners come up to me afterwards and share their thoughts and they were quite pleased that there was a different approach to problem unfortunately suffer from.

    Matthew: Yes, it’s a very common problem these days unfortunately.  What you are saying is a bit of a great segway into today’s topic which is we are looking at vagal stimulation for the treatment of brain disorders and other disorders within the body.  This isn’t a topic that I know much about so I am actually very interested to hear what you have got to say as I am sure our listeners will.  Do you want to start by maybe giving us an overview of what the vagus nerve is, where it’s located etc?

    Carlo: Before I get to the vagus nerve I will take a step back and talk about a part of the brain which the vagus nerve originates from, it’s called a brainstem, within this brainstem are many control centres and they record the autonomic nervous system.  There are many nucleo parts of the autonomic nervous system that sit within the brain stem.  The autonomic brain stem in itself is divided into two parts, there is sympathetic, that brain that helps coordinate our body and our response when we are under stress or when we are under attack and that’s very important and equally important is the flipside to that which our parasympathetic, our parasympathetic system is involved with our rest and digest, it’s involved with the part of the body that helps us

    • 19 min
    Whiplash – What It Is and Its Effects on the Brain

    Whiplash – What It Is and Its Effects on the Brain

    Welcome to BrainHub Podcast where you will discover the top news and tips on keeping your brain healthy.

    Hello and welcome to the BrainHub Podcast I am Matthew Holmes and with me today is Dr. Carlo Rinaudo a chiropractor and the owner of Brain Hub Clinic in Sydney.

    Matthew: Good day Carlo, how are you doing?

    Carlo: Great Matthew, excuse my rusty voice this morning after two weekends of presenting seminar content it’s a little husky today.

    Matthew: Yes, I was going to ask you a little bit about that, you have been doing some seminars for practitioners on the treatment of vestibular disorders, that’s, for those who aren’t practitioners the balance system within the body, do you want to tell us a little bit about how that went?

    Carlo: Yeah, thanks Matt, we were fortunate that we presented to approximately a hundred practitioners in Sydney and Melbourne over two day weekend, we explored vestibular system and how important it’s to many clinical conditions that practitioners see in their office.  We went through an examination and management of people suffering from a range of balance conditions like vertigo, cervical dizziness and other vestibular or balance based conditions.

    Matthew: I know, I was at the Melbourne one and I found it to be extremely interesting and the feedback that I believe you got from a lot of people was that the seminars were very well received so hopefully you will doing a lot of those soon.

    Carlo: Yeah, thanks Matt, we had very favourable comments from a lot of the practitioners and really pleasant to hear they are experience in their own clinic and how they have translated some of the content that we have covered into obtaining favourable patient outcome which is only one of the goals that we set out in putting this on and we have just announced that we are hitting over to Perth so those people in WA who would have also heard of this seminar series.

    Matthew: Yeah that’s great, I am sure we are going to talk a little bit more about vestibular dysfunction and so forth in coming episodes, this is obviously our fourth episode and so far we have looked at the effects of concussion on the brain and how to prevent concussion, how to improve recovery through pre-season screenings and so on and in our last episode we talked about how sugar can have a negative impact on the brain.  So if you haven’t had a chance to listen to those episodes be sure to visit brainhub.com.au/blog and you can find all those episodes there.  Alternatively if you subscribe on iTunes or Stitcher be sure that you won’t miss any episodes that way.  If you like the show be sure to leave us a four or five star review on iTunes, it gives us some nice feedback, it gives us a nice warm fuzzy feeling but also helps others find our podcast as well.  So it’s really great for them, it’s really for us and hopefully you get a nice feeling out if it as well.  So it could be wonderful if you could.  This month we are going to be talking about whiplash, whiplash might seem like an odd topic, there was a great deal of information and awareness raised in the 1980s and 1990s about the effects on the neck and the long term damage that it can cause but the increase in there in that knowledge on brain function has meant that we have discovered impacts on the brain that really weren’t appreciated before.  So Carlo, do you want just to give us some background about whiplash and what it’s and what makes it such an important injury?

    Carlo: Yes, thanks Matt, most of us as you have mentioned historically we think of whiplash as being a neck related injury, technically it’s referred to as an acceleration or deceleration or a hyperflexion-hyperextention injury.  Basically what that means is that we have got this big mass, this ball namely our skull sitting on this thin and fragile structure namely our neck and whenever t

    • 13 min
    Pre-season Screenings – Concussion Management

    Pre-season Screenings – Concussion Management

    Welcome to Brainhub Podcast where you will discover the top news and tips on keeping your brain healthy.

    Matthew: Hello and welcome to the Brainhub Podcast I am Matthew Holmes and with me today is Dr. Carlo Rinaudo, a chiropractor and the owner of the Brain Hub Clinic in Sydney. Hi Carlo.

    Carlo: Hi Matt, great to be here today, how are you?

    Matthew: I am great thanks, yourself.

    Carlo: Awesome, thank you.

    Matthew: Today we are going to be talking again about concussion in particular about using preseason screenings in combating concussions.  Now, we did go into concussion quite a bit in our first episode where we reviewed Will Smith’s new movie called Concussion.  So if you haven’t heard that episode be sure to check it out at brainhub.com.au/blog.

    Preseason screening for concussion has become a bigger thing in recent years, given the time of year in the Southern Hemisphere when people are starting to move into sports where they are more likely to sustain some sort of head impact or concussion.  We are going to touch on why that is the case but first Carlo perhaps you could give us an overview of what a concussion is.

    Carlo: Certainly, a concussion I guess is the most conform of a traumatic brain injury and it is often correctly labelled as a mild traumatic brain injury. The term mild means that it is obviously, it is a closed head injury so there is no open wound but more importantly it’s an injury that results from some sort of mechanical impact where the soft brain which is often described as the consistency of jelly often hits the inside of the skull causing it to shear or compress as it moves around within the skull cavity. With concussions we typically see more of a change in the way the brain functions and how processes and thoughts and movements and so on rather than any change in the structure of the brain.  People see this with MRIs and CT scans, typically after concussion you don’t see any structural change on a scan but you certainly do see changes in the way the brain functions.

    Matthew: Right. So why do you think that this has become such a big deal in recent years, I mean obviously this has been happening for as long as people have been having head impacts, why are we certainly so much more aware of it?

    Carlo: I think for two reasons, there are short term and there are long term effects to the concussion both of which have been played out in the players as well as obviously in the media.  With some of the short term effects that many parents of children, players and even coaches are seeing and these include things like poor memory, brain fog, poor attention and concentration, headaches, dizziness, poor balance, difficult reading, nausea, poor sleep, I mean, these are all the things that parents note.  So it is not being dismissed now as being ah well, you just sleep it off and you will be fine, I think parents are becoming more aware of it and these are some of the short term effects.  The long term effects of concussion are also being played out at the moment in the media from the Concussion movie as we spoke previously as well as some of the high profile litigation cases against American Football and even Aussie Rules.  People are suffering from chronic traumatic encephalopathy where essentially the brain after multiple head injuries turns to marsh and there has been many links to early deaths and suicides and also to things Alzheimer’s and dementia have been to linked to as well.  So I guess to answer your question Matt, it’s becoming a big deal because of what parents and coaches are seeing on a day to day basis but also some of the long term effects that medical practitioners and some of the deaths and long term conditions are seen.

    Matthew: Cool. Or not cool in this case. So that sort of gives us a really good idea about why these are important.

    • 13 min
    The Concussion Movie – Brain Hub Podcast Ep.1

    The Concussion Movie – Brain Hub Podcast Ep.1

    Welcome to Brainhub Podcast where you will discover the top news and tips on keeping your brain healthy.

    Matthew: Hi, welcome to the Brainhub Podcast where we discuss the latest in neuroscience and brain health.  I am Matthew Holmes and with me today is Dr. Carlo Rinaudo a chiropractor and the head clinician and owner of Brain Hub Clinic in Sydney Australia.

    Carlo: Hi Matthew, how are you?

    Matthew: I am great Carlo, yourself?

    Carlo: Very good thank you.

    Matthew: This is obviously our first podcast, what we are going to be doing today and in subsequent episodes of this podcast is that we are going to be diving into the field of neuroscience and brain health.  The thing about neuroscience and brain health is that it is a rapidly expanding field, there is thousands of papers published each month on neuroscience and aspects of brain health and so forth as a full time clinician it is a really full time job just to keep up with that sort of rapidly emerging field. What we are going to do in this podcast is distil that information and present it to you in an easily digestible form, ideally it is going to give you practical tips for improving your brain performance and longevity.  Do you have anything to add on that aspect Carlo?

    Carlo: Yeah, I mean, it is a great point, i think translating some of the research that can be quite technical at times into small chunks that other clinicians or more important for this media is for our patients to understand what is happening in research and how really it relates to the presenting conditions or symptoms.  So we have to be very informative to them.

    Matthew: Excellent, well research is a bit of a thing that is quite dear to your heart, isn’t it?  I believe you are currently doing a PhD, do you want to tell us just a little bit about which institution you are running with and so forth.

    Carlo: Sure, I guess PhD is travelling down a very small rabbit hole, very very deep so I hope to come up the other end with a lot of information and expertise in them in a particular small area although it, the vestibulo-ocular reflex is a very important area of the vestibular rehabilitation.  For those who aren’t aware vestibular rehabilitation is all about retraining and regaining ones balance, reducing symptoms like dizziness and vertigo.  I am very fortunate that my research is part of a world leading lab in vestibular research at Neuroscience Research Australia, or NeuRA which is affiliated with the University of New South Wales and fortunately my lab is also tied in with John Hopkins University, School of Medicine in Baltimore in the States.  So I have got some great supervisors and team members as part of their research group.  Our research focuses on a very important reflex that we all have called the VOR or vestibulo-ocular reflex which its job is essentially to stabilize our vision when we move our head or we move our body.  Very important, so when it doesn’t work our eyes and our inner ears where we have these movement detectors don’t talk to each other particularly well causing our vision and our balance to be affected. And what our studies focused on is doing clinical trials on patients with poor balance and using a novel rehabilitation device that we have developed hoping to retrain these reflex so people feel better.  So it is very much tied in with the Brain Hub clinic but it is also a very expanding and exciting area of neuroscience that a lot of physical therapists, chiropractors and even medical practitioners see in their practices because dizziness disorders makes up a relatively large and significant portion of patients that we see.

    Matthew: Yes and I know that some of the research is coming out and talking about how these vestibular deficits can be responsible with problems with cognition and clear thought and memory and all sorts of aspects like that which ti

    • 23 min

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