84 episodes

Riot Act Podcast's Stephen Hill and Remfry Dedman trawl through the abysmal, the shocking and the maligned in their search for the worst album of all time.
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Broken Records - The Search for the Worst Album Ever Riot Act

    • Music
    • 4.8 • 90 Ratings

Riot Act Podcast's Stephen Hill and Remfry Dedman trawl through the abysmal, the shocking and the maligned in their search for the worst album of all time.
Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    Black Sabbath - Born Again

    Black Sabbath - Born Again

    Welcome back to Broken Records, the podcast that searches in all the right places to crown the very worst album in the history of music. We’ve got a biggie of a name this week as we look at Born Again, the 11th studio album from the inventors of heavy metal, Black Sabbath, released on the 7th of August 1983.
    Sabbath basically dodged a bullet when original vocalist Ozzy Osbourne left the band and they were able to replace him with the equally enigmatic Ronnie James Dio. Dio recorded two albums with Sabbath, with 1980’s Heaven and Hell being considered as good as anything the band had ever put out. But when personal dynamics led to his departure in 1982, Sabbath were once again on the lookout for a new frontman. Enter former Deep Purple vocalist Ian Gillan, a man who was highly influenced by Elvis and used to be in Jesus Christ Superstar, he didn’t quite look the right fit for a doomy, dark and menacing heavy metal band. And so it proved; though Gillan is a fine vocalist, he and the band struggled to gel creatively, and the result is this album, which also features one of the most eyeball abusing front covers in the history of music. To rub salt into the wounds, when the band went out to tour the record they were beset by problems, the main one being a massive Stonehenge stage set that they accidentally erected due to some incorrect measurements. Gillan was soon gone, but he leaves this fascinating album behind him. Question is; is it actually that bad?

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    • 1 hr 9 min
    Screaming Lord Sutch - Lord Sutch and Heavy Friends

    Screaming Lord Sutch - Lord Sutch and Heavy Friends

    Welcome back to Broken Records, where Steve and Remfry have decided to try and find the very worst album of all time. This week we’re looking at the debut album from UK rock personality Screaming Lord Sutch, Lord Sutch and Heavy Friends, released on the 25th of May 1970.
    If you’re of a similar age to us then you might know the name from his various political endeavours back in the 80s and 90s, but Screaming Lord Sutch (not a real Lord) was actually something of a shock rock pioneer back in the early 60’s. He had a hit in 1963 with the song Jack The Ripper and during his live shows he would jump out of a coffin and chuck maggots at the audience...which was nice! But, by 1968 Sutch’s joke had worn thin with the “Great British Public” and he went over to the USA and decided to create his first album with the help of a few friends.
    Those friends were Led Zep pair Jimmy Page and John Bonham, Jeff Beck and Noel Redding of The Jimi Hendrix Experience. Good eh! Well… not if you’re any of those guys, because they weren’t sure what they were doing was even going to feature on the album, as session musicians were brought in to finish parts of the album in the style of the big names that featured. It was released and immediately became hated, both by musicians, with Page being particularly vocal about his dismay at the results, and by music fans, being voted the worst album ever by the BBC in 1998. But is it really that bad? Hmmm…

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    • 1 hr 21 min
    The Doors - Open Voices

    The Doors - Open Voices

    Welcome back to another edition of Broken Records, where Steve and Remfry are charged with the unenviable task of finding the worst album ever made. This week we’re looking at Other Voices, the 7th studio album from the LA psychedelic rock band The Doors, released on the 18th of October 1971.
    In the aftermath of the release of arguably their finest album, 1971’s LA Woman, The Doors were rocked with the untimely passing of their iconic frontman Jim Morrison. They had already been writing as a three piece without the singer and had composed enough material to make a follow up, assuming that Morrison would return from his new home in Paris to complete the material but unfortunately, he passed away July 3rd 1971 before he was able to record any vocals.
    With this news rocking the band they became somewhat punch drunk, stumbling around trying to recruit the likes of Paul McCartney and Iggy Pop, before deciding that Jim Morrison, one of the greatest rock singers ever, didn’t need replacing and that both guitarist Robbie Krieger and keyboardist Ray Manzarek could handle vocal duties themselves. The result was Other Voices, released a mere three months after Morrison’s passing, it stripped The Doors, not just of an iconic voice, but of almost all personality they previously had. In terms of bad ideas, this is right up there, luckily they saw sense and disbanded in 1973, but the appearance of Other Voices in their discography remains a troubling reminder of a very troubling time for the band.

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    • 1 hr 2 min
    Iron Maiden - Virtual XI (w/ Tom Dare from Hell Bent for Metal)

    Iron Maiden - Virtual XI (w/ Tom Dare from Hell Bent for Metal)

    Welcome back to Broken Records, where Steve and Remfry search for the least good of all the albums in the history of music. Today we’re once again joined by Tom Dare, host of the Hell Bent For Metal podcast, as we’re in bad heavy metal territory once again. Yup, the time has come for us to tackle the Blaze Bayley era of Iron Maiden with their 11th studio album Virtual XI from 1998.
    The 90’s weren’t great for Maiden, and unlike a lot of bands they can’t really blame grunge. The faults of that decade were pretty much entirely all their own fault. After a patchy couple of final albums from Bruce Dickinson’s first run in the band, the iconic frontman stepped away from Maiden to make solo material that sounded… well, basically like Iron Maiden. Maiden themselves were charged with replacing their beloved vocalist and decided on Bayley, of Wolfsbane fame, to fill Dickinson’s mighty shoes. 1995’s The X Factor wasn’t particularly well received, but there were mitigating factors to make the case that it was just a blip. But then came Virtual XI, an album that was self produced, was marketed by the band making a fake football team and promoting a video game that wasn’t even out yet, despite neither of those things having anything to do with the album, and was given a lead single called The Angel and The Gambler which is nearly ten minutes long and is… look it’s not good. The record flopped and Maiden seemed destined for the knackers yard. Until they went back to Bruce and, you know, the rest is history. It’s worked out fine for them in the long run, but we still need to know; is Virtual XI really as bad as all that?

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    • 2 hrs 11 min
    Robin Thicke - Paula

    Robin Thicke - Paula

    Welcome to another episode of Broken Records, the podcast which desperately scours the music world and tries to answer that age old question; what is the worst album ever made? This week Steve and Remfry have a hot contender on their hands as they look at Paula by Robin Thicke, the 7th studio album from the soul-pop lothario, released on the 1st of July 2014. 
    Thicke had a pretty decent decade long career in the music industry by 2013, he may not have scaled the heights of a Justin Timberlake or an Usher, but his brand of slinky, sexy, soul was popular enough to earn him a decent following in the US, where he appeared on Oprah and supported Beyonce. But it all changed for him when he released the song Blurred Lines in 2013. The song, as we are sure you’re aware, was a monolithic hit, dominating the airwaves for the entire year, but came with plenty of criticism and controversy, the ugly sexual politics of the song were condemned by many, Thicke stirred the pot further with a overly sexualised performance at the 2013 MTV Awards with Miley Cyrus and the estate of Marvin Gaye launched a plagiarism lawsuit against the song as well. Thicke himself was now at the centre of a media storm, and when allegations of drugs, violence and infidelity came out in the aftermath, his wife of 9 years Paula Patton filed for divorce. Most people would take time away form the spotlight to address these problems in private, but Robin Thicke decided to do the absolute opposite of that, writing and recording an album named after his wife in a mere 7 week period that detailed their relationship in painstakingly minute detail in the vain hope of winning her back. It didn’t. It was a critical and commercial flop, and turned Thicke from one of the biggest stars in music into a washed up nobody practically overnight. Whether this is any good or not we will get to, but in terms of career suicide and a fall from grace, there aren’t many albums that can get close to Paula. 

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    • 1 hr 48 min
    Seether - Finding Beauty in Negative Spaces

    Seether - Finding Beauty in Negative Spaces

    Welcome back to another episode of Broken Records, where Steve and Remfry from that Riot Act show search for the worst album in the history of music. This week we are looking at the 4th album from South Africa post-grunge band Seether; Finding Beauty in Negative Spaces from back in 2007. 
    We don’t know much about Seether, other than some bloke at Sonisphere 2014 really liked them and bullied Steve into playing them on the radio, but it turns out they are a pretty big deal in the US. The band got a foot up from their association with Evanescence vocalist Amy Lee, who appeared on one of their songs and was dating frontman and guitarist Shaun Morgan for a period, before they split up and Lee penned her band's big song Call Me When You’re Sober about Morgan just a year before this record was released. Morgan did in fact try to get sober by checking himself into rehab in 2006, and when he came back, he penned this record full of chunky but unremarkable post-grunge rockers. The press didn’t much care for it, the band still went platinum, and got another boost when they covered George Michael’s immortal Careless Whisper in early 2009. So it hasn’t really done much to crush Seether’s career prospects, and they definitely steadied the ship after this rocky period, but, here’s the big question, is this actually any good at all?

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    • 1 hr 19 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
90 Ratings

90 Ratings

SadieBonbons ,

Gear pod

You should do Summer In Paradise by the Beach Boys, an album so horrific it bankrupted a distribution company, had to be given away on QVC and is currently not on Spotify.

chidzvidz ,

Hilarious show

I’m struggling to find a better way to put this, but Steve is at his best when he’s being negative.

Rockthorne ,

Hilarious and informative!

Brilliant spin off to Riot Act. Very funny but also fair and insightful…..who’d have thought the Naomi Campbell album is actually pretty good!!

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