16 episodes

Cancer is studied from several angles at NDM, from its epidemiology and potential causes, to its effect on patient lives and outcomes, as well as the basic science underpinning the unregulated cell growth that is the hallmark of the disease. Our Cancer podcasts illustrate the diversity of this research, and provide snapshots to the work of NDM scientists and clinicians to understand, treat and prevent cancer.

Cancer Oxford University

    • Courses

Cancer is studied from several angles at NDM, from its epidemiology and potential causes, to its effect on patient lives and outcomes, as well as the basic science underpinning the unregulated cell growth that is the hallmark of the disease. Our Cancer podcasts illustrate the diversity of this research, and provide snapshots to the work of NDM scientists and clinicians to understand, treat and prevent cancer.

    Melanoma

    Melanoma

    Melanoma or skin cancer is one of the fastest rising cancer types. When identified early, melanoma is relatively easy to cure, but once it starts to metastasise, it becomes very difficult to treat. DEREGULATION OF TRANSCRIPTION

    The interface between signal transduction and transcription regulation coordinates gene expression. Deregulation of transcription is a key factor in cancer. Professor Colin Goding studies how a precise programme of transcription regulation is achieved, particularly in the transition between normal and cancer stem cells, and the parallels with normal stem cell populations. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    • 7 min
    Targeting epigenetics to treat cancer

    Targeting epigenetics to treat cancer

    Transcription is a tightly regulated process, where chemical modifications initiate the duplication of genetic material. This epigenetic process is often dysregulated in cancer, but it can be targeted with small molecule inhibitors. EPIGENETIC SIGNALLING

    Professor Panagis Filippakopoulos is interested in the molecular mechanisms of transcription, where the formation of non-covalent protein complexes is mediated by post-translational modifications. Dysfunction in this epigenetic signalling process is linked to disease, particularly cancer. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    • 4 min
    Human Cancer Genetics

    Human Cancer Genetics

    Dr Gareth Bond, Associate Member of the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, studies the influence of genetic variants on the origins, progression and treatment of human cancer. SNP - single nucleotide polymorphisms

    There is great heterogeneity between individuals in their risk of developing cancer, disease progression and responses to therapy. Specific single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are associated with human cancers. They have the potential to help us identify individuals more at risk of developing cancer, and better target preventative or therapeutic strategies. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    • 5 min
    Personalised Medicine

    Personalised Medicine

    Dr Jenny Taylor is the Programme Director for the Genomic Medicine Theme, Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics. Her research bridges the gap between genetics research and the use of its discoveries in diagnosis or treatment of medical conditions. Clinical diagnoses can be broad descriptions, but today's test results can help better understand the condition as well as target treatment. Cancer is a good example in which personalised medicine can help decide which molecular targeted therapy is most appropriate. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    • 4 min
    Cancer predisposition and evolution

    Cancer predisposition and evolution

    Identifying genes that increase the risk of bowel or other cancers allows us to offer preventative measures, such as removing tumours at an early stage. A better understanding of how and why cancers grow also helps develop improved treatments. Ian Tomlinson, Professor of Molecular and Population Genetics at the Wellcome Trust for Human Genetics, works on the identification of genes that predispose to colorectal and other cancers. His research focuses on the relative importance of selection and genomic instability. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    • 3 min
    Cancer Informatics

    Cancer Informatics

    Cancer research now generates huge amounts of data, and sophisticated computational tools are needed to answer biological questions. Making sense of this variability at molecular level will help us better tailor treatments to individual cancer patients. Dr Benjamin Schuster-Böckler heads the computational group at the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research. His work has demonstrated that epigenetic modifications influence the mutational landscape in cancer cells. He studies the effects of DNA-binding proteins on transcription factors, with the aim to understand the regulation (and mis-regulation) of the transcription of important oncogenes and tumour suppressors. Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial-Share Alike 2.0 UK: England & Wales; http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/uk/

    • 6 min

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