23 min

Douglas Clark: Non-invasive Monitoring Technologies in the Canadian Arctic Smart Forests Radio

    • Social Sciences

In this Smart Forests Radio episode, we speak to Dr Douglas Clark, an associate professor at the School of Environment and Sustainability at the University of Saskatchewan. Our conversation revolves around wildlife monitoring technologies and the collaborative process of knowledge production with Northern and Indigenous communities in Arctic Canada. Douglas elaborates on how technologies, when contextualised within local knowledge and conditions, play a crucial role in empowering Indigenous communities to take the lead in scientific research. He emphasises the potential of non-invasive and autonomous technologies, such as remote cameras, drones, and acoustic recording buoys, in researching wildlife and environmental changes in the Arctic.


Interviewers: Trishant Simlai and Max Ritts

Producer: Harry Murdoch
Image: Human-wildlife Interactions Research Group, University of Saskatchewan, https://research-groups.usask.ca/human-wildlife-interaction

In this Smart Forests Radio episode, we speak to Dr Douglas Clark, an associate professor at the School of Environment and Sustainability at the University of Saskatchewan. Our conversation revolves around wildlife monitoring technologies and the collaborative process of knowledge production with Northern and Indigenous communities in Arctic Canada. Douglas elaborates on how technologies, when contextualised within local knowledge and conditions, play a crucial role in empowering Indigenous communities to take the lead in scientific research. He emphasises the potential of non-invasive and autonomous technologies, such as remote cameras, drones, and acoustic recording buoys, in researching wildlife and environmental changes in the Arctic.


Interviewers: Trishant Simlai and Max Ritts

Producer: Harry Murdoch
Image: Human-wildlife Interactions Research Group, University of Saskatchewan, https://research-groups.usask.ca/human-wildlife-interaction

23 min