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The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range". For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio

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The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range". For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio

    Checks and Balance: CEOutrage

    Checks and Balance: CEOutrage

    American companies used to keep quiet about politics, relying on behind the scenes donations and lobbying. But they are increasingly speaking out on a range of issues— most recently on Georgia’s restrictive new voting laws.
     
    Jeffrey Sonnenfeld, of the Yale School of Management, organised a recent meeting of CEOs and says this is a great opportunity for businesses. Henry Tricks, The Economist’s Schumpeter columnist, surveys the history of corporate activism and we explore international comparisons.


    John Prideaux, our US editor, hosts, with New York bureau chief Charlotte Howard, and Jon Fasman, US digital editor.


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    • 42 min
    The path of increased resistance: Myanmar

    The path of increased resistance: Myanmar

    Protests against February’s military coup are only growing, even as the army becomes more murderous. The economy is paralysed. What can be done to put the country back together? In Cuba, the end of the Castro-family era is nigh; a new leader inherits a cratered economy and an ambitious vaccine-development effort. And some surprising road-fatality statistics from America. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer
     
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    • 21 min
    The Economist Asks: Francis Suarez

    The Economist Asks: Francis Suarez

    How do you reinvent a city? The mayor of Miami is on a mission to turn his city into the world’s foremost tech and financial hub. Anne McElvoy explores whether he can tempt entrepreneurs and investors away from Silicon Valley and Wall Street and how he will improve the lives of Miamians. Mayor Suarez talks about his ambitions in the Republican Party and reveals why he did not vote for Donald Trump.


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    • 24 min
    Boots off the ground: America’s Afghanistan drawdown

    Boots off the ground: America’s Afghanistan drawdown

    Few believe President Joe Biden’s withdrawal plan is wise; it is already prompting allied forces to go. We ask about the risks of that untimely vacuum. Much climate-change angst focuses on carbon dioxide, but addressing sources of methane would be an easy way to slow warming—and even to save money. And Bhutan’s world-beating vaccination drive took just one week. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer
     
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    • 20 min
    Babbage: Where it began

    Babbage: Where it began

    Almost a year and a half since the discovery of the virus that causes covid-19, The Economist’s health policy editor, Natasha Loder, investigates one of the pandemic’s most compelling mysteries: where did SARS-CoV-2 come from? Peter Daszak, who was part of the World Health Organisation’s controversial fact-finding mission to China, explains what evidence they gathered from Wuhan’s animal markets and the city’s microbiology laboratories. 


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    • 35 min
    Arms’ reach: Russia flexes at Ukraine border

    Arms’ reach: Russia flexes at Ukraine border

    The troops and hardware piling up at the border are probably just posturing. But look closely: Russia’s military is swiftly getting better-equipped and better-trained. Outsized inflation numbers in America are partly a statistical quirk—but also a sign of the tricky balance pandemic-era policymakers must navigate. And why you may soon be getting a lift from a flying taxi. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer
     
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    • 22 min

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5
972 Ratings

972 Ratings

Sk91468 ,

Israel’s vaccination lead - highly exclusive!

Love this podcast, listen to it very frequently. However, yesterday I listened to the episode ‘Arms within reach: Israel’s vaccination lead’ and realised that you did not at all mention the fact that millions of Palestinians have been largely excluded from Israel’s ‘great vaccination campaign’. This is quite an important fact when considering the overall picture of this ‘lead’, don’t you think? I would love to see an episode where this issue is highlighted!

Cattyastrophy ,

Phillipa Perry

Today’s show hosted by Anne was nothing new, however the insights provided by Dr Perry were revolutionary to me.I do have her book and have had it for a year and I have not come across the natural instinct of teenagers to want to find their own ‘tribe’ so to speak , exemplified by her talk of the 13 year old. I realise as social beings we crave peers, though, I wonder why society is so keen to move away from their children most of whom were sought after in earnest by some parents ( easier for some to conceive, harder for others). It is true that we all have our jobs/ commitments and additionally to homeschool our children has been the greatest challenge of all, financially and mentally. So my pontification is not so much on why we consider our own children to be a bother , which I do wonder why, but rather why society sees it that way?( aside from juggling commitments that is ).I do have children by the way and to be honest aside from juggling my chores and theirs ,I did enjoy my time with them at home immensely. If only we did not have to homeschool them as much, or society was structured in a way that it was adaptable to do so without causing too much harm and angst! Pandemic aside. Of course they missed their peers however none of them seemed really bothered. Mind you , they’re not teenagers ... yet.

vanmay1 ,

Good mix of politics, economy and science

Great to take a step back from daily news noise. Great interviews. Really backed up facts and figures. A must

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