24 episodes

Exclusive Podcasts that tackle the crucial environmental issues impacting today’s global textile and clothing supply chains. Put together by the team that launched the pioneering Ecotextile News magazine back in 2007, we take listeners behind the scenes to reveal how we break the news and also provide deep dive Newscasts on sustainability, ethics, policy, retail, pollution and the carbon crisis engulfing our planet.

Ecotextile Talks MCL News and Media

    • Business
    • 5.0 • 3 Ratings

Exclusive Podcasts that tackle the crucial environmental issues impacting today’s global textile and clothing supply chains. Put together by the team that launched the pioneering Ecotextile News magazine back in 2007, we take listeners behind the scenes to reveal how we break the news and also provide deep dive Newscasts on sustainability, ethics, policy, retail, pollution and the carbon crisis engulfing our planet.

    Editor's Picks: June 29th 2022

    Editor's Picks: June 29th 2022

    Welcome to the first episode of Editor’s picks.
    Each week the Editor of Ecotextile News will select a few key stories from the magazine that he thinks you need to hear. 
    This week we report on:
    How fashion is reacting to the implementation of new regulations in the US that assume any product partly or wholly made in the Xinjiang region of north-west China, is linked to the region’s labour camps and cannot enter the country. (2.15)
    Some promising new DNA-based technology that claims to pinpoint the exact origin of textile fibres and could help to filter out Xinjiang-grown cotton from global supply chains. (6.50)
    How a 400 million Euro investment in Finland aims to scale up the production of textile fibres made entirely from waste clothing and other textiles. (11.19)
    And in our fourth, and final story, we have a disturbing report from India that exposes how some garment workers on the Indian sub-continent are still suffering from illegal rates of pay, verbal abuse, and even sexual harassment. (13.55)
    The stories are about to hear are just a sample of what is on offer in Ecotextile News. 
    With a subscription, you can read all of our journalism, with many more exclusive stories, and ideas on sustainability in the fashion and textile industry.  
    For new subscribers please use our time-limited 15% off by inputting POD15:  https://www.ecotextile.com/magazine-subscribe

    • 18 min
    What are the biggest ESG risks in fashion today?

    What are the biggest ESG risks in fashion today?

    Randy Rankin, Eurofins Consumer Products Assurance Global Client Development Director for North America discusses the current key environmental, social, and governance risks facing the global textile and apparel industry.
    Rankin tells our host, Philip Berman, how he believes that new and proposed legislation on the fashion industry – on both sides of the Atlantic – are the key developments that should be concerning global brands right now.
    He cites the EU Corporate Sustainability Due Diligence Directive, as well as similar national moves in countries such as France and Germany, as key examples.
    These laws aim to make companies legally responsible for environmental and human rights issues in their global supply chains and to make it much easier for victims to seek legal redress.
    Rankin also talks about the proposed New York Fashion Act, which would require larger companies operating in New York to map out at least half of their supply chains, from raw materials to final product.
    And he mentions the Uyghur Forced Labour Prevention Act, which bans US imports of products, such as cotton, from the Xinjiang region of China unless proof can be provided that they were not the result of forced labour.
    Rankin says the trend towards legislation is a new development in the industry where concern over supply chain issues has been traditionally driven by reactions to major incidents, such as the Rana Plaza disaster.
    However, he feels increasing concern by both consumers and – crucially – investors are creating a new landscape where legislators are demanding more transparency from the industry's often opaque supply chains.
    If you want to contact Randy he can be reached on  +1 717 719 0287 (if you are outside the US) or emailing randyrankin@eurofinsus.com

    • 35 min
    Why using bio-polymers to make textiles is more than just a 'corny' story

    Why using bio-polymers to make textiles is more than just a 'corny' story

    Alexa Raab, the global brand and communications manager for bio-materials with US chemicals giant DuPont, explains how the company's partially *bio-based Sorona PTT is helping to lower carbon emissions and increase circularity, and why its launched a Preferred Mill Network programme to support the fibre's expansion.
    *37% comes from corn-starch

     

     
     

    • 23 min
    How Pearl Izumi uses the Higg Product Tool

    How Pearl Izumi uses the Higg Product Tool

    This episode is brought to you by Higg, the technology platform that helps companies measure, manage, and share their social and environmental sustainability data.
    Host Philip Berman talks to McKenzie Everett, from the cycling apparel brand Pearl izumi, about her company's commitment to sustainability, and how it uses the Higg Product Design Tools to measure, manage, and share the environmental impact of its products. 
    To date, 300 leading brands have used the Higg Product Design Tools to measure the impact of over 2,800 products. 
    In the conversation, McKenzie explains how Pearl iZumi uses these tools and the innovative way the brand invites its customers to participate in offsetting the carbon footprint of the products they purchase. 

    • 29 min
    Figuring out your carbon emissions and water impact

    Figuring out your carbon emissions and water impact

    Host Philip Berman talks to Alisia Mätz, from OEKO-TEX®, about the launch of their new tool to help facilities measure and manage their carbon emissions and water usage.
    Their new Impact Calculator (IC) has been implemented into the STeP certification system at the start of 2022.
    You can find more details about it here. 
     
     
     

    • 22 min
    Re-thinking the rules of fashion

    Re-thinking the rules of fashion

    Ken Pucker discusses why 25 years of corporate social responsibility has done little to curb carbon emissions from the textile industry, and why we urgently need new laws to save the planet.
    Ken is a former chief operating officer at Timberland, a lecturer, and a vocal critic of the Environmental and Social Governance Industry.
    His most recent article for the Harvard Business - entitled The Myth of Sustainable Fashion has gained some traction online - so we thought it was time to get him on our podcast!
    It was partially a take-down of the ESG industry, and how he thinks it has failed to curb the carbon excesses of the textile industry. 
    Currently, he’s a senior Lecturer in Sustainable Business Dynamics at the Fletcher School at Tufts University in Boston.
    He’s also been advising some of the NGOs involved in pushing forward The Fashion Sustainability and Social Accountability Act in New York State - which discuss in the podcast.
    We started off by talking about his time at Timberland from 1992 to 2007, with the last seven years as Chief Operating Officer.
    This was during a period when its CEO Jeff Shwartz pioneered a business model of Justice with the three pillars of  Environmental Stewardship, Global Human Rights, and Citizen Service.
    Other articles by Ken Pucker:
    Harvard Business Review
    Overselling Sustainability Reporting: We’re Confusing Output with Impact
     
    Institutional Investor
     
    The Trillion Dollar Fantasy

     
     

    • 30 min

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