6 episodes

I want to interview everyday people that I find extraordinary.
Not the celebrities we often hear interviewed who - following the death of a parent - went on to make millions setting up a business or something similar.
But ordinary - relatable people.

I want to talk to those that lost a parent in their early formative years.

I am not coming at this from the angle of a psychologist but from the angle of a friend encouraging the interviewee to share their experiences and give some helpful advice both to those going through the same thing and those trying to help their friends.

Extraordinary Ordinary People Hamish Adams-Cairns

    • Education

I want to interview everyday people that I find extraordinary.
Not the celebrities we often hear interviewed who - following the death of a parent - went on to make millions setting up a business or something similar.
But ordinary - relatable people.

I want to talk to those that lost a parent in their early formative years.

I am not coming at this from the angle of a psychologist but from the angle of a friend encouraging the interviewee to share their experiences and give some helpful advice both to those going through the same thing and those trying to help their friends.

    Anna Marshall

    Anna Marshall

    I want to interview everyday people that I find extraordinary.


    Not the celebrities we often hear interviewed who, following the death of a parent, went on to make millions setting up a start-up of some kind or another.


    But ordinary, relatable people. My friends.


    Losing a parent is surely one of the hardest things any of us will have to deal with in life. And yet, it is one we will all experience at some point.


    I want to talk to those who experienced this all too soon. Those who lost a parent in their early formative years.


    How has it changed them?


    What are they doing now?


    And most importantly what was the best thing their friends or family said to them during this time? How should we react on hearing a great friend of ours has suffered such a loss? There isn’t a guide book for this and many feel at a loss as to know how to react. Should I encourage them to talk about it? Or would they rather speak about anything but it? How do I not treat them differently whilst showing them that they have my full support?


    In short what helped and what didn’t help them?


    I am not coming at this from the angle of a psychologist. And I understand the incredibly sensitive and personal nature of the interview. I am approaching this from the angle of a friend trying to encourage the interviewee to share their experiences and give some helpful advice both to those going through the same thing and those trying to help their friends. 



    In this episode I had the absolute pleasure of sitting down with Anna who opens up beautifully and eloquently about the effects of losing her father at such a young age. We discussed an enormous range of topics from grief, to male influences to the #metoo movement in what was a fascinating hour shared with one of my favourite people! I hope you enjoy listening to it as much as I did recording it. Thanks as ever for your continued support and particular thanks to the wonderful Anna Marshall!

    • 1 hr 19 min
    Bells English

    Bells English

    I want to interview everyday people that I find extraordinary.


    Not the celebrities we often hear interviewed who, following the death of a parent, went on to make millions setting up a start-up of some kind or another.


    But ordinary, relatable people. My friends.


    Losing a parent is surely one of the hardest things any of us will have to deal with in life. And yet, it is one we will all experience at some point.


    I want to talk to those who experienced this all too soon. Those who lost a parent in their early formative years.


    How has it changed them?


    What are they doing now?


    And most importantly what was the best thing their friends or family said to them during this time? How should we react on hearing a great friend of ours has suffered such a loss? There isn’t a guide book for this and many feel at a loss as to know how to react. Should I encourage them to talk about it? Or would they rather speak about anything but it? How do I not treat them differently whilst showing them that they have my full support?


    In short what helped and what didn’t help them?


    I am not coming at this from the angle of a psychologist. And I understand the incredibly sensitive and personal nature of the interview. I am approaching this from the angle of a friend trying to encourage the interviewee to share their experiences and give some helpful advice both to those going through the same thing and those trying to help their friends. 



    In this - our fifth episode - I had the pleasure of interviewing my wonderful friend and proud owner of the deserved nickname 'Fit Bells'! Listen as she opens up about the loss of her father and the difficulties she faced in starting university so soon after his loss, whilst also playing the older sister to her younger siblings. 

    • 41 min
    Ruaraidh Adams-Cairns

    Ruaraidh Adams-Cairns

    I want to interview everyday people that I find extraordinary.


    Not the celebrities we often hear interviewed who, following the death of a parent, went on to make millions setting up a start-up of some kind or another.


    But ordinary, relatable people. My friends.


    Losing a parent is surely one of the hardest things any of us will have to deal with in life. And yet, it is one we will all experience at some point.


    I want to talk to those who experienced this all too soon. Those who lost a parent in their early formative years.


    How has it changed them?


    What are they doing now?


    And most importantly what was the best thing their friends or family said to them during this time? How should we react on hearing a great friend of ours has suffered such a loss? There isn’t a guide book for this and many feel at a loss as to know how to react. Should I encourage them to talk about it? Or would they rather speak about anything but it? How do I not treat them differently whilst showing them that they have my full support?


    In short what helped and what didn’t help them?


    I am not coming at this from the angle of a psychologist. And I understand the incredibly sensitive and personal nature of the interview. I am approaching this from the angle of a friend trying to encourage the interviewee to share their experiences and give some helpful advice both to those going through the same thing and those trying to help their friends.



    In this weeks episode I interview my own Dad. We explore (for the first time!) the challenges he faced losing his father so young, how it differed to losing his mother 20 years later, and how it may have affected the way he has acted as a parent himself.

    • 1 hr 8 min
    Alby Shale

    Alby Shale

    I want to interview everyday people that I find extraordinary.

    Not the celebrities we often hear interviewed who, following the death of a parent, went on to make millions setting up a start-up of some kind or another.

    But ordinary, relatable people. My friends.

    Losing a parent is surely one of the hardest things any of us will have to deal with in life. And yet, it is one we will all experience at some point.

    I want to talk to those who experienced this all too soon. Those who lost a parent in their early formative years.

    How has it changed them?

    What are they doing now?

    And most importantly what was the best thing their friends or family said to them during this time? How should we react on hearing a great friend of ours has suffered such a loss? There isn’t a guide book for this and many feel at a loss as to know how to react. Should I encourage them to talk about it? Or would they rather speak about anything but it? How do I not treat them differently whilst showing them that they have my full support?

    In short what helped and what didn’t help them?

    I am not coming at this from the angle of a psychologist. And I understand the incredibly sensitive and personal nature of the interview. I am approaching this from the angle of a friend trying to encourage the interviewee to share their experiences and give some helpful advice both to those going through the same thing and those trying to help their friends.

    Our third episode sees us meet the wonderfully charismatic Alby Shale who speaks at length with us about the loss of his father.

    • 1 hr 9 min
    Hugo Elwes

    Hugo Elwes

    I want to interview everyday people that I find extraordinary.

    Not the celebrities we often hear interviewed who, following the death of a parent, went on to make millions setting up a start-up of some kind or another.

    But ordinary, relatable people. My friends.

    Losing a parent is surely one of the hardest things any of us will have to deal with in life. And yet, it is one we will all experience at some point.

    I want to talk to those who experienced this all too soon. Those who lost a parent in their early formative years.

    How has it changed them?

    What are they doing now?

    And most importantly what was the best thing their friends or family said to them during this time? How should we react on hearing a great friend of ours has suffered such a loss? There isn’t a guide book for this and many feel at a loss as to know how to react. Should I encourage them to talk about it? Or would they rather speak about anything but it? How do I not treat them differently whilst showing them that they have my full support?

    In short what helped and what didn’t help them?

    I am not coming at this from the angle of a psychologist. And I understand the incredibly sensitive and personal nature of the interview. I am approaching this from the angle of a friend trying to encourage the interviewee to share their experiences and give some helpful advice both to those going through the same thing and those trying to help their friends.

    Our second episode of the series sees me sit down with the beautifully honest Hugo Elwes who talks me through his experiences concerning the loss of his father.

    • 1 hr 13 min
    Georgie Sandeman

    Georgie Sandeman

    I want to interview everyday people that I find extraordinary.

    Not the celebrities we often hear interviewed who, following the death of a parent, went on to make millions setting up a start-up of some kind or another.

    But ordinary, relatable people. My friends.

    Losing a parent is surely one of the hardest things any of us will have to deal with in life. And yet, it is one we will all experience at some point.

    I want to talk to those who experienced this all too soon. Those who lost a parent in their early formative years.

    How has it changed them?

    What are they doing now?

    And most importantly what was the best thing their friends or family said to them during this time? How should we react on hearing a great friend of ours has suffered such a loss? There isn’t a guide book for this and many feel at a loss as to know how to react. Should I encourage them to talk about it? Or would they rather speak about anything but it? How do I not treat them differently whilst showing them that they have my full support?

    In short what helped and what didn’t help them?

    I am not coming at this from the angle of a psychologist. And I understand the incredibly sensitive and personal nature of the interview. I am approaching this from the angle of a friend trying to encourage the interviewee to share their experiences and give some helpful advice both to those going through the same thing and those trying to help their friends.

    In this our first episode, I meet with the beautiful Georgie Sandeman who talks me through the loss of her father - Paddy.

    • 37 min

Customer Reviews

Downnotoutpod ,

A great listen!

Love this podcast. Really thought provoking stuff. Hamish negotiates a tricky topic with a characteristically deft touch

Billyhawes2105 ,

Amazing piece of work

All the interviewees are so inspiring and I am sure that their story will help so many others. What a great idea for a Pod and Hamish is very engaging and has the perfect balance of being personable and asking all the right questions. Looking forward to more episodes

JakeWarren1990 ,

Mr

Authentic, engaging and intimate conversations on loss and its affects, would reccomend to anyone and everyone!

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