4 episodes

The food system causes about a third of global greenhouse gas emissions. How can we, as individual citizens, reduce the environmental impact of our food?
Feed the Planet is the podcast that tries to tackle that question. Each episode Professor Sarah Bridle, Chair of Food, Climate and Society at the University of York, talks to experts about how we can change our diets to eat more sustainably. Drawing on science and data they discuss the positive changes we can make, the barriers that get in our way and how we can overcome them.
Does the way you cook your food matter? Which plant milk is best? Is it worth changing your diet or would other lifestyle tweaks have more impact?
Sarah is the author of a book called Food and Climate Change Without the Hot Air and is on a mission to get people thinking about the environmental impact of food we eat and how we can make a more resilient food system. Sarah is a Co-Lead of the AFN Network+ (UKRI Agri-food for Net Zero Network+) and one of the leaders of FixOurFood, a project which aims to transform the Yorkshire food system to one that is regenerative.
Find out more about Sarah Bridle.
Follow Sarah on X.
This podcast was produced by Molly Watson, funded by the University of York, working with FixOurFood.
Artwork by Laura Tordoff, University of York. Music by Vitalii Korol from Pixabay.

Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

Feed the Planet - Conversations on Food and Climate Change University of York

    • Education

The food system causes about a third of global greenhouse gas emissions. How can we, as individual citizens, reduce the environmental impact of our food?
Feed the Planet is the podcast that tries to tackle that question. Each episode Professor Sarah Bridle, Chair of Food, Climate and Society at the University of York, talks to experts about how we can change our diets to eat more sustainably. Drawing on science and data they discuss the positive changes we can make, the barriers that get in our way and how we can overcome them.
Does the way you cook your food matter? Which plant milk is best? Is it worth changing your diet or would other lifestyle tweaks have more impact?
Sarah is the author of a book called Food and Climate Change Without the Hot Air and is on a mission to get people thinking about the environmental impact of food we eat and how we can make a more resilient food system. Sarah is a Co-Lead of the AFN Network+ (UKRI Agri-food for Net Zero Network+) and one of the leaders of FixOurFood, a project which aims to transform the Yorkshire food system to one that is regenerative.
Find out more about Sarah Bridle.
Follow Sarah on X.
This podcast was produced by Molly Watson, funded by the University of York, working with FixOurFood.
Artwork by Laura Tordoff, University of York. Music by Vitalii Korol from Pixabay.

Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    Why What We Eat Matters for Climate Change: Sarah Bridle talks to Dave Reay

    Why What We Eat Matters for Climate Change: Sarah Bridle talks to Dave Reay

    At this stage in the series we wanted to take a step back to ask the questions:

    How important is food when it comes to climate change?How much difference can individuals actually make?And if we are going to change the way we eat, how can we do this in a way that’s just and fair to everyone?  
    In this episode I talk to Professor Dave Reay, Chair in Carbon Management at the University of Edinburgh and author of several books on exactly these topics. Dave talks to me from his farm on the Mull of Kintyre, where he’s planting trees and trying to remove his family’s carbon footprint.
    A full transcription of this episode is available on YouTube,
    This podcast was produced by Molly Watson, funded by the University of York, working with FixOurFood.
    If you have enjoyed this podcast please like, subscribe and leave a review.
    More about Dave:
    Professor Dave Reay is Co-Chair of the Just Transition Commission which advises the Scottish Government and has just stepped down as Director of the Edinburgh Climate Change Institute. As well as being a leading researcher, Dave is the author of several books including “Your Planet Needs You! A Kid’s Guide to Going Green' and “Climate-smart Food” which examines the contribution and resilience of popular foods to climate change.
    Useful links:
    Dave on LinkedIn
    Climate - Smart Food
    Climate change begins at home
    https://blogs.ed.ac.uk/davereay/home/
    Our World in Data
    Useful links from Sarah Bridle
    Sarah’s website
    Food and Climate Change Without the Hot Air


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    • 28 min
    Balancing Human and Planetary Health: Sarah Bridle talks to Barbara Bray

    Balancing Human and Planetary Health: Sarah Bridle talks to Barbara Bray

    There are a whole range of factors that affect the food choices that people make every day. Time and convenience, how much money we’ve got, our taste preferences - as well as the environmental impact. But we can't really discuss planetary health without talking about human health, which is why I was really keen to talk to my guest today, Barbara Bray. 
    Barbara is a PhD researcher in healthy ageing diets at Queen’s University Belfast. She’s also director of Alo Solutions - a consultancy which helps businesses develop sustainable nutrition strategies and is a registered nutritionist.
    In this episode we discuss:

    What you need to think about in terms of nutrition if you’re considering adopting a more climate friendly diet.The cross-over between foods that are good for humans and the planetHow what we eat changes as we ageThe barriers to choosing healthier foods
    A full transcription of this episode is available on YouTube.
    This podcast was produced by Molly Watson, funded by the University of York, working with FixOurFood.
    If you have enjoyed this podcast please like, subscribe and leave a review.
    Notes:
    More about Barbara:
    Barbara has 25 years experience in the food industry including working on the nutritional quality of products. In 2019 Barbara was awarded an MBE for services to food nutrition and last year did an internship in the UK government in the Defra team looking at policy on healthy diets. Barbara is currently researching for a PhD in healthy ageing diets at Queen’s University Belfast. She’s also director of Alo Solutions - a consultancy which helps businesses develop sustainable nutrition strategies. Barbara is a registered nutritionist and is also host of the Women Positively Ageing podcast.

    Useful links:
    Barbara on LinkedIn
    Barbara on Twitter
    Barbara on Instagram
    Alo solutions
    Women Positively Ageing podcast
    Eating sustainably | British Nutritional Foundation
    FSA Survey: Food and You 2
    Eatwell Guide
    TEDx - Diet, Diversity and the Future of Food
    TEDx - 'What Youth Can Teach us About Positive Ageing
    Useful links from Professor Sarah Bridle
    Sarah's website
    Food and Climate Change Without the Hot Air

    Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    • 25 min
    Cooking and Climate Change: Sarah Bridle talks to Christian Reynolds

    Cooking and Climate Change: Sarah Bridle talks to Christian Reynolds

    When we talk about greenhouse gas emissions and food, we usually focus on food production, but these estimates often only tell the story as far as the farm gate or the retailer. How important are the choices we make in our own kitchens? Studies have suggested that home cooking can account for as much as 60% of the total emissions associated with certain foods. In this episode I’m talking to Dr Christian Reynolds, Reader in Food Policy at the Centre for Food Policy at City, University of London, and a global expert on food loss and waste, and sustainable diets.
    We discuss:

    The environmental impact of different cooking methodsWhich appliances produce the most and least emissionsThe significance of cooking compared to other factors
    A full transcription of this episode is available on YouTube.
    This podcast was produced by Molly Watson, funded by the University of York, working with FixOurFood.
    Notes:
    More about Christian:
    Christian is also the Senior Tutor for Research at the Centre for Food Policy at City and leads the UK Food Systems Centre for Doctoral Training at the university. Christian has worked on food waste and sustainable diets in Australia, New Zealand, Indonesia, the UK, US and Europe, and is the lead editor of the Routledge Handbook of Food Waste (2019). Christian is also an adjunct Research Fellow at the Institute for Sustainable Food, University of Sheffield, and at the Barbara Hardy Institute for Sustainable Environments and Technologies, University of South Australia.

    Useful links:
    Christian on LinkedIn
    Christian on X
    FSA - cooking your food - safety advice
    Chill the Fridge Out
    Wonderbag
    How to cook a more sustainable Sunday roast - The Conversation
    Impacts of home cooking methods and appliances on the GHG emissions of food - Nature Food Journal
    The Food Programme - Low Energy Cookers: Fad or Food for Life? - BBC Sounds
    How much could you save by not using your oven? - BBC News
    Useful links from Professor Sarah Bridle
    Sarah's website
    Food and Climate Change Without the Hot Air

    Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    • 24 min
    The Environmental Impact of Plant Milk vs Dairy: Sarah Bridle talks to Rosie Green

    The Environmental Impact of Plant Milk vs Dairy: Sarah Bridle talks to Rosie Green

    One of the things I get asked about a lot is plant milks, how they compare to dairy and how they compare to each other. The best person to discuss this with is Professor Rosie Green, Chair in Environment, Food and Health at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine. Rosie is a world leading researcher on the link between diets, the environment and human health.
    In this episode we discuss:

    The rise of plant based alternative foodsHow their environmental impact compares to meat and dairy productsThe role of plant-based alternatives in transitioning to more sustainable dietsThe challenges and barriers that prevent more people adopting these alternatives
    You can find a full transcription of the podcast on YouTube.
    This podcast was produced by Molly Watson, funded by the University of York, working with FixOurFood.
    If you have enjoyed this podcast please like, subscribe and leave a review.
    More about Rosie
    Rosie Green is Professor at the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine. Rosie is head of the Planetary Health Group in the Department of Population Health and is also Co-Director of the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine Centre on Climate Change and Planetary Health. Rosie also co-leads the Pathfinder Initiative which aims to provide practical, evidence based pathways to net zero through transformative local, regional and global actions and in 2020 was a member of the scientific panel for the UK Citizens Assembly on Climate Change.
    Useful links:
    Rosie on LinkedIn
    The role of plant based alternative foods in sustainable and healthy food systems
    Broken Plate, Food Foundation
    The future of dairy and meat consumption in the UK
    Centre on Climate Change and Planetary Health
    Pathways to a healthy net-zero future: report of the Lancet Pathfinder Commission
    Mapping the evidence of novel plant-based foods: a systematic review of nutritional, health and environmental impacts in high-income countries 
    Useful links from Professor Sarah Bridle:
    Sarah Bridle's website
    Food and Climate Change Without the Hot Air

    Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information.

    • 21 min

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