39 min

Fertility Education with Professor Joyce Harper The Stork and I

    • Kids & Family

In this episode I chat to Professor Joyce Harper, Professor of Reproductive Science at the Institute for Women’s Health, University College London. She is also Director of Education at the IfWH, Director of the Centre for Human Reproduction, co-founder of the UK Fertility Education Initiative and Founder of the International Fertility Education Initiative. 
 
I met Joyce at the Fertility Fest last year and have been a fan of her work ever since. She has worked in the fields of fertility, genetics, reproductive health and women’s health for over 30 years and shares so many interesting facts in this episode. 
 
In this episode we discuss: 
- Joyce's personal fertility journey to have her children
- Fertility Education and the book Joyce is currently writing about The Fertile Years
- The UK Fertility Education Initiative and getting fertility on the UK national curriculum 
- The fact that we can no longer accurately use the term 2.4 children due to the change in the current statistics
- Egg freezing, the legislation surrounding it and why you might want to consider embryo freezing as an alternative
- Why you might not want to wait for the right man to come along after age 35 if you definitely want children
- The 9 point fertility education poster being shared worldwide
- The importance of understanding our menstrual cycle
- Why women in the media getting pregnant in their late 40s and 50s can be quite misleading
- The research that has been carried out on solo motherhood and how to share donor conception with donor conceived children
 
And lot's more!
 
I don't want the details shared to scare anyone, but feel it is important to get these fertility facts out there. If anyone feels anxious about what they have heard, please feel free to reach out to me. 
 
You can find out more about Joyce and her work on her website. 
You can also follow her on Instagram and Twitter
 
Be sure to subscribe on your favourite podcast player to ensure you don't miss an episode!
 

In this episode I chat to Professor Joyce Harper, Professor of Reproductive Science at the Institute for Women’s Health, University College London. She is also Director of Education at the IfWH, Director of the Centre for Human Reproduction, co-founder of the UK Fertility Education Initiative and Founder of the International Fertility Education Initiative. 
 
I met Joyce at the Fertility Fest last year and have been a fan of her work ever since. She has worked in the fields of fertility, genetics, reproductive health and women’s health for over 30 years and shares so many interesting facts in this episode. 
 
In this episode we discuss: 
- Joyce's personal fertility journey to have her children
- Fertility Education and the book Joyce is currently writing about The Fertile Years
- The UK Fertility Education Initiative and getting fertility on the UK national curriculum 
- The fact that we can no longer accurately use the term 2.4 children due to the change in the current statistics
- Egg freezing, the legislation surrounding it and why you might want to consider embryo freezing as an alternative
- Why you might not want to wait for the right man to come along after age 35 if you definitely want children
- The 9 point fertility education poster being shared worldwide
- The importance of understanding our menstrual cycle
- Why women in the media getting pregnant in their late 40s and 50s can be quite misleading
- The research that has been carried out on solo motherhood and how to share donor conception with donor conceived children
 
And lot's more!
 
I don't want the details shared to scare anyone, but feel it is important to get these fertility facts out there. If anyone feels anxious about what they have heard, please feel free to reach out to me. 
 
You can find out more about Joyce and her work on her website. 
You can also follow her on Instagram and Twitter
 
Be sure to subscribe on your favourite podcast player to ensure you don't miss an episode!
 

39 min

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