179 episodes

H&P is a unique collaboration between the Institute of Contemporary British History at King's College London and the University of Cambridge.

We are the only project in the UK providing access to an international network of more than 500 historians with a broad range of expertise. H&P offers a range of resources for historians, policy makers and journalists.

History & Policy History & Policy

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H&P is a unique collaboration between the Institute of Contemporary British History at King's College London and the University of Cambridge.

We are the only project in the UK providing access to an international network of more than 500 historians with a broad range of expertise. H&P offers a range of resources for historians, policy makers and journalists.

    Trade Unions and Employment in a Market Economy

    Trade Unions and Employment in a Market Economy

    ONLINE SEMINAR


    Trade Unions and Employment in a Market Economy


    Thursday 21 May 2020, 6pm-8pm


    Andrew Brady will introduce his recent book:


    Unions and Employment in a Market Economy, Strategy, Influence and Power in Contemporary Britain (Routledge 2019)


    Other speakers included Sir Ian McCartney and Tom Wilson.


    The Seminar was chaired by Helen Hague


    Andrew Brady was awarded his PhD from the University of Strathclyde in 2017. He has held various positions within Unite the Union and is currently based in Scotland in the union’s Political, Research & Campaigns Unit.


    Sir Ian McCartney was Shadow Minister, Minister of State, and Cabinet Minister 1992–2007 and led the Labour Government’s work on employment and employment rights.


    Tom Wilson was Director of Unionlearn at the TUC until 2017. He has also worked for the GMB, the Labour Party as Trade Union Liaison Officer, the AUT and Natfhe (now UCU).


    Helen Hague is a journalist and has recently worked on a history of the Fire Brigades Union.

    Brexit and workers’ rights - Professor Simon Deakin

    Brexit and workers’ rights - Professor Simon Deakin

    Brexit and workers’ rights

    1 October 2019 - 18:30 pm - 20:30 pm


    Keating Chambers, 15 Essex St, Temple, London WC2R 3AA


    Chaired by Sarah Veale


    Professor Michael Gold and Professor Simon Deakin talk on ‘What the UK's membership of the EU has entailed for workers’ rights and how the UK might achieve dynamic alignment of these rights after Brexit.’

    Brexit and workers’ rights - Professor Michael Gold

    Brexit and workers’ rights - Professor Michael Gold

    Brexit and workers’ rights

    1 October 2019 - 18:30 pm - 20:30 pm


    Keating Chambers, 15 Essex St, Temple, London WC2R 3AA


    Chaired by Sarah Veale


    Professor Michael Gold and Professor Simon Deakin talk on ‘What the UK's membership of the EU has entailed for workers’ rights and how the UK might achieve dynamic alignment of these rights after Brexit.’

    Professor Shurlee Swain - How historians can assist in historic child abuse inquiries

    Professor Shurlee Swain - How historians can assist in historic child abuse inquiries

    9 September 2019 - 18:00 pm - 19:30 pm

    Anatomy Museum, King's College London, 6th floor, King's Building, Strand, London WC2R 2LS


    Over the past twenty years, a growing number of countries have established national inquiries in relation to historic child abuse, encompassing investigations of abuse in residential institutions and foster-care, as well as abuse in the context of particular types of institution or specific child welfare programmes.


    Historical researchers have engaged with these inquiries in a range of different roles – as members of inquiry secretariats, consultants, expert witnesses and, in at least one case, as the director of a national inquiry (Prof Pirjo Markkola in Finland).


    This panel brings together speakers with a range of expertise across these different roles to explore what we can learn from a range of international examples about the relationship between historical research and child abuse enquiries.


    Amongst the questions to be explored in this session are:


    How important is historical knowledge for the setting of the remits and scope of inquiries?

    What are the challenges and limitations of using different kinds of historical material in child avuse inquiries?

    In what ways can inquiries succeed or fail as forms of public history in increasing public understanding of historic abuse?

    Speakers:


    Professor Pirjo Markkola (Tampere University and former director of the Finnish national child abuse inquiry)


    Professor Eoin O’Sullivan (Trinity College Dublin; his work with Mary Raftery on the history of abuse in Irish industrial schools led to the setting up of the Ryan Commission)


    Professor Johanna Sköld (Linköping University and former member of the secretariat for the Swedish Inquiry into Child Abuse and Neglect in Institutions and Foster Homes)


    Professor Shurlee Swain (Australian Catholic University and contributor of historical research to numerous abuse inquiries in Australia)


    Event organiser:


    Gordon Lynch is Michael Ramsey Professor of Modern Theology at the University of Kent. He has undertaken a range of research and public history projects in relation to the history of UK child migration programmes, including a national museum exhibition at the V&A Museum of Childhood and the musical project, The Ballads of Child Migration. He has served as an expert witness for the Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse, and continues to serve in this capacity for the Scottish Child Abuse Inquiry.

    Professor Pirjo Markkola - How historians can assist in historic child abuse inquiries

    Professor Pirjo Markkola - How historians can assist in historic child abuse inquiries

    9 September 2019 - 18:00 pm - 19:30 pm

    Anatomy Museum, King's College London, 6th floor, King's Building, Strand, London WC2R 2LS


    Over the past twenty years, a growing number of countries have established national inquiries in relation to historic child abuse, encompassing investigations of abuse in residential institutions and foster-care, as well as abuse in the context of particular types of institution or specific child welfare programmes.


    Historical researchers have engaged with these inquiries in a range of different roles – as members of inquiry secretariats, consultants, expert witnesses and, in at least one case, as the director of a national inquiry (Prof Pirjo Markkola in Finland).


    This panel brings together speakers with a range of expertise across these different roles to explore what we can learn from a range of international examples about the relationship between historical research and child abuse enquiries.


    Amongst the questions to be explored in this session are:


    How important is historical knowledge for the setting of the remits and scope of inquiries?

    What are the challenges and limitations of using different kinds of historical material in child avuse inquiries?

    In what ways can inquiries succeed or fail as forms of public history in increasing public understanding of historic abuse?

    Speakers:


    Professor Pirjo Markkola (Tampere University and former director of the Finnish national child abuse inquiry)


    Professor Eoin O’Sullivan (Trinity College Dublin; his work with Mary Raftery on the history of abuse in Irish industrial schools led to the setting up of the Ryan Commission)


    Professor Johanna Sköld (Linköping University and former member of the secretariat for the Swedish Inquiry into Child Abuse and Neglect in Institutions and Foster Homes)


    Professor Shurlee Swain (Australian Catholic University and contributor of historical research to numerous abuse inquiries in Australia)


    Event organiser:


    Gordon Lynch is Michael Ramsey Professor of Modern Theology at the University of Kent. He has undertaken a range of research and public history projects in relation to the history of UK child migration programmes, including a national museum exhibition at the V&A Museum of Childhood and the musical project, The Ballads of Child Migration. He has served as an expert witness for the Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse, and continues to serve in this capacity for the Scottish Child Abuse Inquiry.

    Professor Johanna Sköld - How historians can assist in historic child abuse inquiries

    Professor Johanna Sköld - How historians can assist in historic child abuse inquiries

    9 September 2019 - 18:00 pm - 19:30 pm

    Anatomy Museum, King's College London, 6th floor, King's Building, Strand, London WC2R 2LS


    Over the past twenty years, a growing number of countries have established national inquiries in relation to historic child abuse, encompassing investigations of abuse in residential institutions and foster-care, as well as abuse in the context of particular types of institution or specific child welfare programmes.


    Historical researchers have engaged with these inquiries in a range of different roles – as members of inquiry secretariats, consultants, expert witnesses and, in at least one case, as the director of a national inquiry (Prof Pirjo Markkola in Finland).


    This panel brings together speakers with a range of expertise across these different roles to explore what we can learn from a range of international examples about the relationship between historical research and child abuse enquiries.


    Amongst the questions to be explored in this session are:


    How important is historical knowledge for the setting of the remits and scope of inquiries?

    What are the challenges and limitations of using different kinds of historical material in child avuse inquiries?

    In what ways can inquiries succeed or fail as forms of public history in increasing public understanding of historic abuse?

    Speakers:


    Professor Pirjo Markkola (Tampere University and former director of the Finnish national child abuse inquiry)


    Professor Eoin O’Sullivan (Trinity College Dublin; his work with Mary Raftery on the history of abuse in Irish industrial schools led to the setting up of the Ryan Commission)


    Professor Johanna Sköld (Linköping University and former member of the secretariat for the Swedish Inquiry into Child Abuse and Neglect in Institutions and Foster Homes)


    Professor Shurlee Swain (Australian Catholic University and contributor of historical research to numerous abuse inquiries in Australia)


    Event organiser:


    Gordon Lynch is Michael Ramsey Professor of Modern Theology at the University of Kent. He has undertaken a range of research and public history projects in relation to the history of UK child migration programmes, including a national museum exhibition at the V&A Museum of Childhood and the musical project, The Ballads of Child Migration. He has served as an expert witness for the Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse, and continues to serve in this capacity for the Scottish Child Abuse Inquiry.

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