145 episodes

This London based resonance 104.4 fm radio series is a collection of contemporary sonic journeys with fine artist Simon Tyszko.

It is a mixture of essays, psychogeographies and notional detours, taking in special guests, field & location recordings, interviews, conversations, walks, experimental music and gallery works.

Broadcast on resonance fm in london Every Tuesday 2-3 pm 104.4 fm and streaming on www.resonancefm.com, www.extra.resonance.fm, and now on DAB

Each episode will start off at point A and hopefully, end up in another alphabet altogether.

Isotopica Simon Tyszko

    • Performing Arts

This London based resonance 104.4 fm radio series is a collection of contemporary sonic journeys with fine artist Simon Tyszko.

It is a mixture of essays, psychogeographies and notional detours, taking in special guests, field & location recordings, interviews, conversations, walks, experimental music and gallery works.

Broadcast on resonance fm in london Every Tuesday 2-3 pm 104.4 fm and streaming on www.resonancefm.com, www.extra.resonance.fm, and now on DAB

Each episode will start off at point A and hopefully, end up in another alphabet altogether.

    Plays For Horses

    Plays For Horses

    The Train Rolls On Chris Marker Le Train En Marche (1971)

    First the eye, then the cinema, which prints the look….

    A stunned episodepost tory election landslide,in which we listen simultaneously,to both the French and English soundtracks,of Chris Marker'sLe Train En Marche,in an attemptperhaps,to revisit,and evenfind a route back to,the utopiandreamsand projectsof both early and latetwentieth century cultural marxism.

    …the train of revolution, the train of history has not lacked reverse signals and switched points but the biggest mistake one could make was to believe that it had come to a halt.



    “If Chris asked you to do something you did it: There was no question”, recalls Marc Karlin in one of his last interviews before his death in 1999. ‘Chris’, needless to say, was Chris Marker, Karlin’s friend who he called ‘le maitre’. The task was to provide an English version of Marker’s recent film Le train en marche (1971) – a celebration of the Soviet era filmmaker Alexander Medvedkin and his mythical ‘kino-poezd’ – a ‘cine train’ re-fitted with cameras, editing tables and processing labs, that travelled the breadth of Russia to make films for and with the workers. Films made on the spot, in collaboration with the local people, (workers in factories, peasants in kolhozs), shot in one, day, processed during the night, edited the following day and screened in front of the very people who had participated to its making… Contrarily to the agit-prop trains which carried official propaganda from the studios to the people, here the people was his own studio. And at the very moment bureaucracy was spreading all over, a film unit could go and produce uncensored material around the country. And it lasted one year (1932)!Medvedkin saw his kino-poezd (294 days on the rails, 24,565m of film projected, 1000km covered) as a means of revolutionising the consciousness of the Soviet Union’s rural dwellers. Marker hoped his recent unearthing would incite similar democratic film-making. In tribute, Karlin and other kindred spirits in London joined Cinema Action.” There was a relationship to the Russians. Vertoz, the man and the movie camera, Medvedkin, and his agitprop Russian train; the idea of celebrating life and revolution on film, and communicating that. Medvedkin had done that by train. SLON and Cinema Action both did it by car. Getting a projector, putting films in the boot, and off you went and showed films – which we did”.

    The people were brought the filmmaker’s cinema, in the same way they were brought the artist’s art and the expert’s science. But in the case of this train the cinema was to become something created with contact through the people and was to stimulate them to make their own intervention.

    • 58 min
    Music For Birds

    Music For Birds

    Performed by humans, Produced by birds.

    An international phone conversation, London to Berlin, with Elo Masing representing Berlin based WIG (improvisational trio), and Simon Tyszko in London, discussing the world’s first musical transcription produced by birds,

    Music For Birds  by WIG, and It’s genesis within the glamorous and rarefied world of cross species art with avian tandem Kakaduu.Agapornis Fischeri, better known by the artist name Kakaduu, is originally from Central Africa and now based in Berlin, Germany. They established themselves as artists in London, UK, where they lived from 2010 to 2015.

    They have been active in the visual arts since 2010 and first gained recognition with the wood veneer and cardboard sculpture “Me and My Home”. Other well-known works include “My Cage” and “My Nightmares About the Cat”.

    Kakaduu is one of the most remarkable contemporary practitioners of environmental art in Europe, choosing to use mostly recycled material in creating artworks. They prefer figurative wood sculpture, although often also paint on different materials. Favourite media include wood, wood veneer, cardboard, and coconut shell; for painting they use recycled food.

    Better known paintings from the mature period include “Kakaduu S**t on Canvas”, “Kakaduu S**t on Glass”, “Kakaduu S**t on Veneer”, “Kakaduu S**t on Cupboard Door”, “Kakaduu S**t on Porcelain”, “Kakaduu S**t on A4” and “Kakaduu S**t on DVD”. Well-known artworks from the most recent output include “London”, “The Dwarf’s House on the Hill”, “We Went to See the Elephant” and “The Squirrel, the Cat and the Hare”.

    Kakaduu’s works have been shown at The First and Second International World Exhibition of Artist Birds.

    Kakaduu is represented by Gallery Zebra&Tiger.

    New website in progress at www.kakaduu.art. Watch this space!Scientists claim that birds’ and animals’ brains cannot discern complex intellectual objects such as music.





    ‘ ,

    That for them, human music is like white noise, similar to the sound of rain, waves or rustling leaves for us. That they can’t hear anything interesting in it, the same way we can’t understand what birds say to each other, all their adventures and other information they share so vividly.

    ,             ////7

    O>’ O>’ O~ Ö:::::::::=)’

    This may very well be so – if during early development birds’ brains are not exposed to music and don’t learn to grasp it, they probably won’t be able to do it later. Much like a human child who, growing up in the wild without hearing any human language, wouldn’t be able to learn to speak as an adult, even when exposed to human speech.

    , ‘ ‘ “

    ‘(o.

    0060000909~.9-8.989

    But it seems to us that birds’ brains can be trained to hear music; they can discern very complex intellectual and emotional objects if they’ve been exposed to them from an early age – for example if the birds have grown up in musicians’ homes.

    ‘, ‘

    They become thoroughly unique experts on music, with their own completely unique taste, because their learning and teaching ability in the realm of sonic arts is great. If only someone saw it and knew how to use it.

    (i!iiii!!!!!i!¡¡¡

    ‘ ‘“

    “ “

    ,

    We’ve been lucky that we’ve come across two of such unique birds, who understand what’s there in the music they hear and what’s not in many respects better than humans. As choosing the right tracks for the album was much easier for them than it ...

    • 58 min
    Unprepared Piano stories

    Unprepared Piano stories

    From Chile to Chatham both haunted and alive.







    Some field recordings and ambient sounds from summer 2019.





    A zoom recorder balanced just below the pendulum of an ancient yet working grandfather clock in a central room of a venerable Kent House, picks up the steady yet illusory passage of time along with snippets of family life and conversations. We feature the story of a piano in Chile played by spirits, after stumbling across Julian*s evocation of those ghosts on an old detuned upright in a lost bedroom, bringing us perhaps to consider the psychogeography of an unprepared piano. Peter Suchin riffs on the semiotics of image via Roland Barthes, and an endless vortex filling of a narrow boat water tank punctuates a summer day on the last pirate island of London (as far as we know), as the clock tic toc tic tocs us along to almost certain extinction, and we wonder how to, or even if to, make art, as time is undeniably running out.





    One way in to the old kent house







    A zoom recorder balanced just below the pendulum of an ancient yet working grandfather clock in a central room of a venerable Kent House, picks up the steady yet illusory passage of time along with snippets of family life and conversations. We feature the story of a piano in Chile played by spirits, after stumbling across Julian*s evocation of those ghosts on an old detuned upright in a lost bedroom, bringing us perhaps to consider the psychogeography of an unprepared piano. Peter Suchin riffs on the semiotics of image via Roland Barthes, and an endless vortex filling of a narrow boat water tank punctuates a summer day on the last pirate island of London (as far as we know), as the clock tic toc tic tocs us along to almost certain extinction, and we wonder how to, or even if to, make art, as time is undeniably running out.







    







     





    Peter Suchin Explain Art To A Live Cat 2019







     







     







    *Julian Burger Visiting Professor at University of Essex, Human rights and indigenous law

    • 58 min
    Voiced, spoken, said, uttered, expressed, articulated, oral, by mouth.

    Voiced, spoken, said, uttered, expressed, articulated, oral, by mouth.

    A Radio impression of VOCALIS, an irregular performance event at the delicious Beaconsfield Gallery Vauxhall London.

    VOCALIS places emphasis on giving voice in many forms; sharing ideas, drawing on collective memory and Beaconsfield’s long engagement with text, time-based/live art, performance and sound. Informal and open, Vocalis happens in Beaconsfield’s intimate cafe space – where food and fluids mix with electrical impulses and vocalised concepts.



     

    Jeroen van Dooren explores divided subjectivities in the company of performing rabbits



    Jefford Horrigan performs a very personal ritual within a bespoke sculptural assemblage that is jealous of painting



    Tara Fatehi Irani mishandles an archive from Tehran through photographic images, dance, spoken word and digital media

    Liming Lin aspires to be a symbol – that everyone looks up to



    Niamh Roberts delivers a love story especially penned for Vocalis.

    • 58 min
    extinction or rebellion, rebellion or extinction….THIS IS NOT A DRILL!

    extinction or rebellion, rebellion or extinction….THIS IS NOT A DRILL!

    99.7% scientific consensus

    414 parts of CO2 per million, the highest in earths history.

    Once in a lifetime weather events every week.

    Mass extinction and loss of natural habitat happening now.

    Short term profits in place of life as we know it.

    We are facing an unprecedented global emergency. Life on Earth is in crisis: scientists agree we have entered a period of abrupt climate breakdown, and we are in the midst of a mass extinction of our own making.

    this is not a drill this is not a drill this is not a drill



    https://rebellion.earth

    Worldwide Rebellion: Continues 7 October 2019

    • 59 min
    Multilingual, multifaceted, Intended, Multiplex, Zoe Zakovski

    Multilingual, multifaceted, Intended, Multiplex, Zoe Zakovski

    A play on words

    Zoe Zarkovsi and Simon Tyszko engage in Word play or wordplay (also: play-on-words) being a literary technique and a form of wit in which words used become the main subject of the work, primarily for the purpose of intended effect or amusement.

    Examples of word play include puns, phonetic mix-ups such as spoonerisms, obscure words and meanings, clever rhetorical excursions, oddly formed sentences, double entendres, and telling character names (such as in the play The Importance of Being Earnest, Ernest being a given name that sounds exactly like the adjective earnest). Word play is quite common in oral cultures as a method of reinforcing meaning. Examples of text-based (orthographic) word play are found in languages with or without alphabet-based scripts; for example, see homophoerate our accompanying nic puns in Mandarin Chinese.



    Deleuze and food, time and chance, combine with a collection of pure data patches that algorithmically generate our accompanying soundtrack, the hidden hand of a god who simply never existed.



    Le menu est la liste des divers mets qui composent le repas. Dans un restaurant, ou à la cantine, c’est l’ensemble des mets qui peuvent être servis pour un prix déterminé.

    Par métonymie, le menu est le feuillet, le carton, le tableau, l’affichette, l’objet ou la brochure qui liste :



    * les mets servis lors d’un repas : manuscrit ou imprimé, illustré ou non, il présente au convive la liste des mets et boissons qui vont lui être servis lors d’un repas ou d’un banquet. Cette pratique, qui remonte au xixe siècle, et qui tend à se perdre (sauf dans les réceptions officielles), participe à l’art de la table ; elle offre de précieux renseignements aux historiens de la cuisine ;

    * le choix des différents mets pouvant être servi pour un repas au restaurant.

    • 58 min

Top Podcasts In Performing Arts