68 episodes

In these podcasts we will be talking about the latest research, new devices and techniques, as well as controversial topics in the field of Neurointerventional Surgery.

JNIS podcast BMJ Group

    • Science

In these podcasts we will be talking about the latest research, new devices and techniques, as well as controversial topics in the field of Neurointerventional Surgery.

    Complete flow control in transvenous embolization of cerebral arteriovenous malformations

    Complete flow control in transvenous embolization of cerebral arteriovenous malformations

    In this podcast, JNIS Editor-In-Chief Felipe C. Albuquerque and Adnan Siddiqui discuss a case series that describes complete flow control using concurrent transient rapid ventricular pacing with afferent arterial balloon flow arrest technique as “safe and feasible” for transvenous embolization of select cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVM).
    Dr Siddiqui (Department of Neurosurgery, University at Buffalo, NY, USA) is the lead author of “Complete flow control using transient concurrent rapid ventricular pacing or intravenous adenosine and afferent arterial balloon occlusion during transvenous embolization of cerebral arteriovenous malformations: case series”, published in the April 2021 issue of JNIS.
    Link to the paper: https://jnis.bmj.com/content/13/4/324

    COVID-19: the downtrend of African American stroke patients receiving mechanical thrombectomy

    COVID-19: the downtrend of African American stroke patients receiving mechanical thrombectomy

    JNIS Editor-In-Chief, Felipe C. Albuquerque, interviews Sami Al Kasab and Alejandro Spiotta, both from the Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, USA. They discuss the Stroke Thrombectomy and Aneurysm Registry data showing an “alarming downtrend in mechanical thrombectomy rates in African American patients during the COVID-19 pandemic”.
    Read the related article online (https://jnis.bmj.com/content/early/2021/01/06/neurintsurg-2020-016946) and in the March issue of JNIS.
    Please subscribe to the JNIS Podcast via all podcast platforms, including Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Stitcher and Spotify, to get episodes automatically downloaded to your mobile device and computer. Also, please consider leaving us a review or a comment on the JNIS Podcast iTunes page:
    https://podcasts.apple.com/gb/podcast/jnis-podcast/id942473767

    Environmental sustainability in neurointerventional procedures

    Environmental sustainability in neurointerventional procedures

    Operating rooms contribute between 20% to 70% of hospital waste. Neurointerventional procedures, in particular, generate a substantial amount of that waste: an average of 8 kg per case, recently aggravated by the COVID-19 pandemic.
    JNIS Editor-In-Chief, Felipe C. Albuquerque, interviews Pey Ling Shum, Monash Health, Clayton, Victoria, Australia, about her recent paper “Environmental sustainability in neurointerventional procedures: a waste audit” - https://jnis.bmj.com/content/12/11/1053
    Please also read the related commentary "Greening the neurointerventional suite" - https://jnis.bmj.com/content/12/11/1037
    Please subscribe to the JNIS Podcast via all podcast platforms, including Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Stitcher and Spotify, to get episodes automatically downloaded to your mobile device and computer. Also, please consider leaving us a review or a comment on the JNIS Podcast iTunes page:
    https://podcasts.apple.com/gb/podcast/jnis-podcast/id942473767

    Being a female physician in a male-dominated speciality

    Being a female physician in a male-dominated speciality

    Sexism is common place in one of the most male-dominated subspecialties in medicine. Despite this, the prevalence of women physicians in neurointervention is steadily rising.
    In this podcast, JNIS Editor-In-Chief, Felipe C. Albuquerque, interviews neurointerventionalists Stephanie H Chen - Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Miami School of Medicine - and Marie-Christine Brunet - Department of Neurological Surgery (NEUR) at McGill University - about the challenges of being a female physician in this field.
    They are the authors of the first study examining the amount of maternal and fetal radiation exposure during a pregnant neurointerventional fellow’s training. Spoiler alert: the findings suggest that, when optimal radiation safety practices are implemented, the fetal dose of a pregnant neurointerventionalist is negligible.
    Read the paper for free for a month on the JNIS website:
    https://jnis.bmj.com/content/12/10/1014
    Please subscribe to the JNIS Podcast via all podcast platforms, including Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Stitcher and Spotify, to get episodes automatically downloaded to your mobile device and computer. Also, please consider leaving us a review or a comment on the JNIS Podcast iTunes page:
    https://podcasts.apple.com/gb/podcast/jnis-podcast/id942473767

    Transarterial and transvenous access in neurointervention

    Transarterial and transvenous access in neurointervention

    The recommendations resulting from the report of the SNIS Standards and Guidelines Committee on transarterial access are discussed in this podcast.
    JNIS Editor-In-Chief, Felipe C. Albuquerque, interviews Robert Starke (University of Miami MILLER School of Medicine, Miami Beach, Florida, and Westchester Medical Center, Valhalla, New York) and Justin Fraser (University of Kentucky, Lexington), who recently published the paper “Transarterial and transvenous access for neurointerventional surgery: report of the SNIS Standards and Guidelines Committee” on behalf of the Society of NeuroInterventional Surgery.
    Read the paper on the JNIS website: https://jnis.bmj.com/content/12/8/733

    ‘Chronic intracranial venous hypertension syndrome’: a new classification scheme for IIH

    ‘Chronic intracranial venous hypertension syndrome’: a new classification scheme for IIH

    JNIS Editor-In-Chief Felipe C. Albuquerque discusses idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) and a new patient classification paradigm with Kyle Fargen (Neurological Surgery, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, USA) and Michael Levitt (Neurological Surgery, University of Washington, Seattle, USA). Both authors recently wrote about the intersection between IIH and venous sinus stenosis, an increasingly hot topic within the neurointerventional community. In the podcast, the participants discuss this novel classification, venous sinus stenting, and issues pertaining to this diverse patient population.
    Read the paper and the commentary on the JNIS website:
    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension is not idiopathic: proposal for a new nomenclature and patient classification
    https://jnis.bmj.com/content/12/2/110
    Commentary: Another version of the truth
    https://jnis.bmj.com/content/12/4/335

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