300 episodes

Listen to the latest literary events recorded at the London Review Bookshop, covering fiction, poetry, politics, music and much more.
Find out about our upcoming events here: https://lrb.me/bookshopeventspod

London Review Bookshop Podcast London Review Bookshop

    • Books
    • 4.3, 56 Ratings

Listen to the latest literary events recorded at the London Review Bookshop, covering fiction, poetry, politics, music and much more.
Find out about our upcoming events here: https://lrb.me/bookshopeventspod

    Lorna Goodison and Linton Kwesi Johnson

    Lorna Goodison and Linton Kwesi Johnson

    Writing on Lorna Goodison’s poetry, Derek Walcott asks ‘What is the rare quality that has gone out of poetry that these marvellous poems restore? Joy.’ Goodison has served as the Poet Laureate of Jamaica and published twelve volumes of poetry; her Collected Poems came out from Carcanet in 2017. In 2019, she won the Queen’s Gold Medal for Poetry.


    Linton Kwesi Johnson is one of the only three poets to be published as a Penguin Modern Classic while still alive; his collections include Inglan is a Bitch, Tings an’ Times, and Mi Revalueshanary Fren.


    Johnson and Goodison were in conversation.
     
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    • 47 min
    Hot Milk: Deborah Levy and Lauren Elkin

    Hot Milk: Deborah Levy and Lauren Elkin

    There is a sort of chase for coherence in the current commercial market for fiction ... a sort of terror of there being any kind of mystery in a book, or even a character being confused.


    Deborah Levy, described by Lauren Elkin in the TLS as ' one of the most exciting voices in contemporary British fiction' was at the Bookshop to talk about her latest novel Hot Milk (Hamish Hamilton), which explores the strange and monstrous nature of motherhood.


    “A bright broth of myth, psychology, Freudian symbolism and contemporary anxiety.” – Guardian
     
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    • 46 min
    Citizens of Everywhere: Shami Chakrabarti, Tom McCarthy, Eloise Todd and Lauren Elkin

    Citizens of Everywhere: Shami Chakrabarti, Tom McCarthy, Eloise Todd and Lauren Elkin

    Are we English, British, European, citizens of the planet Earth or none of the above? The ‘Citizens of Everywhere’ project invites writers, artists and journalists to respond to the seismic shifts in European and American politics, and their implications for the future, in ways that are creative, surprising, and, most importantly of all, useful. Baroness Shami Chakrabarti, Labour peer and former director of Liberty, novelist Tom McCarthy and campaigner Eloise Todd were at the shop to debate the future of citizenship in Britain, Europe and beyond. Lauren Elkin, author of Flaneuse and co -director of the Centre for New and International Writing at the University of Liverpool, was in the chair.
     
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    • 48 min
    Lost Voices: Fred D'Aguiar, David Olusoga, Catherine Fletcher and Nandini Das

    Lost Voices: Fred D'Aguiar, David Olusoga, Catherine Fletcher and Nandini Das

    The fleeting appearance of black faces in Tudor paintings marks the silent presence of a community's untold story. Who were the black men and women who lived, loved, and died in Renaissance Britain? How did they arrive? And how can we recover their voices when all we have is a glimpse in a portrait here, or church and court record there? At this event the writer Fred D'Aguiar and historians David Olusoga and Catherine Fletcher joined Nandini Das, director of TIDE, to explore the challenge of using fiction to recover those lost voices in history.
     
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    • 55 min
    Nancy Fraser and Ann Pettifor: 'Capitalism: A Conversation in Critical Theory'

    Nancy Fraser and Ann Pettifor: 'Capitalism: A Conversation in Critical Theory'

    In Capitalism: A Conversation in Critical Theory (Polity) Nancy Fraser and Rahel Jaeggi engage in a critical dialogue that seeks to expand our understanding of capitalism, revealing it to be not merely a system of economic relations, but rather a form of institutionalised social order, and one that continually reinvents itself through crisis. Nancy Fraser, Professor of Political & Social Science at the New School for Social Research, was in conversation about capitalism and its discontents with Ann Pettifor, Director of Prime (Policy Research in Macroeconomics), Fellow of the New Economics Foundation and author of The Production of Money (Verso).
     
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    • 59 min
    Danny Dorling, Richard Wilkinson and Rupa Huq: ‘A Better Politics’

    Danny Dorling, Richard Wilkinson and Rupa Huq: ‘A Better Politics’

    Danny Dorling, Professor of Geography at the University of Oxford and, according to Simon Jenkins in the Guardian, 'the geographer royal by appointment to the left', returned to the Bookshop to talk about his new book A Better Politics: How Government Can Make Us Happier (London Publishing Partnership). Dorling's book looks at the evidence for a successful politics that would promote happiness and health and suggests policies that take account of this evidence. Dorling was in conversation with Rupa Huq, Labour MP for Ealing Central and Acton, and Richard Wilkinson, co-author of The Spirit Level.
     
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    • 49 min

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5
56 Ratings

56 Ratings

_______hr ,

Brilliant content, sound quality not always great

This podcast is often brilliantly rich, and always worth listening to, often repeatedly, and it is for this reason that the not great sound quality is sometimes frustrating - background noise etc. If the sound quality, both in recording and mixing, were to be given just a little more attention this would be a completely excellent podcast.

TCA WATCHES ,

Great stuff

Very good

IanRecorder ,

Modern Nature

Good podcast ruined by a member of the audience continually ‘um-img’ In agreement with comments being made about Jarman. The final comment by Keith Collins is not relevant to Jarman and the audience’s embarrassment can be sensed. Maybe a good sound engineer monitoring the recording would have felt with the um’s and editor should be employed to tidy the finished article. A superb collection on anecdotes and interesting information ruined by poor production.

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