64 episodes

Love is the Message: Music, Dance & Counterculture is a new show from Tim Lawrence and Jeremy Gilbert, both of them authors, academics, DJs and dance party organisers.

Tune in, Turn on and Get Down to in-depth discussion of the sonic, social and political legacies of radical movements from the 1960s to today. Starting with David Mancuso's NYC Loft parties, we’ll explore the countercultural sounds, scenes and ideas of the late 20th and early 21st centuries.

”There’s one big party going on all the time. Sometimes we get to tune into it.” The rest of the time there’s Love Is The Message.

Love is the Message: Dance, Music and Counterculture Love is the Message podcast

    • Music
    • 5.0 • 63 Ratings

Love is the Message: Music, Dance & Counterculture is a new show from Tim Lawrence and Jeremy Gilbert, both of them authors, academics, DJs and dance party organisers.

Tune in, Turn on and Get Down to in-depth discussion of the sonic, social and political legacies of radical movements from the 1960s to today. Starting with David Mancuso's NYC Loft parties, we’ll explore the countercultural sounds, scenes and ideas of the late 20th and early 21st centuries.

”There’s one big party going on all the time. Sometimes we get to tune into it.” The rest of the time there’s Love Is The Message.

    LITM Extra - 'What We're Listening To' June '22

    LITM Extra - 'What We're Listening To' June '22

    This is an excerpt of a full length episode currently only available to patrons. To become a patron and support what we're doing from £3 per month, head to www.patreon.com/LoveMessagePod.

    In this patrons-only bonus episode, Jeremy and Tim have a conversation about what music has been on their turntables recently.  Jeremy brings a pair of Indian compositions from very different ends of the musical spectrum: a steel strung guitar played like a sitar, and one of ten famous 'ragas to a disco beat'. Joining the dots between Indian Classical, '60s American fingerpickers and today, we also hear a new-ish release on show favourite International Anthem from reformed Post-Rocker Jeff Parker, and tuck into some 2010s electronic Afro-Disco from London's Ibibio Sound Machine.

    Tim shares a number of new discoveries, including the riotous contemporary Ghanian gospel of Alotgté Oho and a deeply psychedelic dancefloor freakout from Nico Gomez. We end with the new release from our friends at Beauty and the Beat, a tried-and-tested remix from our friend Kay Suzuki of some fantastic Guadalupian Gwoka.  

    This is part of a rough series of more conversational, unplanned episodes reflecting on what's been on our record players recently and what we've been up to that we'll be releasing to patrons to say thank you for your support.  

    Produced and edited by Matt Huxley.  

    The tracks discussed are: Jeff Parker - Four Folks
    Vishwa Mohan Bhatt - Raag Bageshree
    Don Cherry - Om Shanti Om
    Alogté Oho - Doose Mam
    Ibibio Sound Machine - The Talking Fish
    Nico Gomez and His Afro Percussion Inc. - Baila Chibiquiban
    Charanjit Singh - Raga Bhairav
    Gaoulé Mizik - A Ka Titine (Kay Suzuki Gwoka Dub)  

    Order your copy of Excursions in Gwoka vol . 1 from Beauty and the Beat here: https://beautyandthebeat1.bandcamp.com/album/excursions-in-gwoka-vol-1-batb-005

    • 7 min
    LITM Extra - Decolonising Disco—Counterculture, Postindustrial Creativity, the 1970s Dance Floor and Disco pt.2 [excerpt]

    LITM Extra - Decolonising Disco—Counterculture, Postindustrial Creativity, the 1970s Dance Floor and Disco pt.2 [excerpt]

    This is an excerpt of a full length episode currently only available to patrons. To become a patron and support what we're doing from £3 per month, head to www.patreon.com/LoveMessagePod.

    In this patrons-only episode Tim concludes reading from his essay Decolonising Disco—Counterculture, Postindustrial Creativity, the 1970s Dance Floor and Disco, published recently in the collection Global Dance Cultures in the 1970s and 1980s: Disco Heterotopias, edited by Flora Pitrolo and Marko Zubak.  Picking up where he left off in part 1, Tim introduces us to Sylvere Lotringer, the French critic who straddled both the worlds of academic Post-Structuralism and the Downtown NYC scene, itself a 'heterotopic' formation (after Foucault). We hear about the hybridity and convergence of the city's overlapping scenes in the early '80s, embodied by musicians like Arthur Russell, before the AIDS and Crack crises, Reaganomics and shifts in the art world caused this exciting collectivism to give way to more individualist modes of creation and production.

    In the final part of the essay, Tim shows how music from Africa, Latin America and Europe was a central component of what he calls 'Discotheque music' (ie records you would hear on the DJ-led dancefloors) which produced the original disco sound. With reference to SalSoul, Saturday Night Fever, Nigerian disco, contemporary reissue labels and more, Tim makes the case for these non-American, largely non-white musics to be included in an expanded edition of the disco archive. Lots of great musical examples are used in this show to illustrate the essay.

    Tracklist:
    The B52s - Rock Lobster
    The Peech Boys - Don't Make Me Wait
    Public Enemy - Public Enemy Number 1
    Fela Kuti - Shakara
    The Lafayette Afro Rock Band - Djungi
    Black Blood - A. I. E. (A Mwana)
    Tony Allen with Africa 70 - Afrodisco Beat
    Orlando Julius - Disco Hi-Life
    King Sunny Adé - 365 is My Number / The Message
    N'draman Blintch - Cosmic Sounds
    Khalab ft. Tenesha The Wordsmith - Black Noise

    • 11 min
    Small Islands of the Caribbean- Trinidad, Guadalupe and Haiti

    Small Islands of the Caribbean- Trinidad, Guadalupe and Haiti

    In this week's podcast Jeremy and Tim turn their atteniton to the musical cultures of 1965-1975 on some of the smaller islands of the Caribbean: Trinidad, Guadalupe and Haiti. We hear about Trinidad's particular combination of Afro-diasporic and South Asian populations during Imperial rule, how Calypso mediated the island's relationship to the British Empire, the emergence of the steel pans on the island in the face of persecution, and how American Soul influences gave rise of Soca.

    Tim and Jeremy also discuss the archipelago of Guadaloupe - not a country but a department of France - and it's two great Twentieth Century musics, Zouk and Gwaka. They discuss the history of Haiti, from its successful slave revolt to the many political pressures its suffered subsequently, and it's Compas music, along with the particularities of the spiritual practice of Voodoo on the island. Plus, cricket lovely cricket!

    Tim Lawrence and Jeremy Gilbert are authors, academics, DJs and audiophile dance party organisers. They’ve been friends and collaborators since 1997, teaching together and running parties since 2003. With clubs closed and half their jobs lost to university cuts, they’re inevitably launching a podcast.

    Produced and edited by Matt Huxley.  

    Tune in, Turn on, Get Down!

    Become a patron from as little as £3pcm by visiting www.patreon.com/LoveMessagePod

    Tracklist:
    Trinidad All-Star Percussion Band - Excerpt from British news reel
    Lord Kitchener - London is the Place for Me
    Lord Kitchener - Black Power
    Lord Kitchener - Victory Calypso
    Lord Shorty - Soul Calypso
    Lord Shorty - Indrani
    Les Vikings de la Guadeloupe - Assez Palé
    Exile One - One Favor
    Ensemble Aux Calebasses De Nemours Jean Baptiste - Donnez moi La Main
    Shleu-Shleu - Ceremonie Loa

    You can find friend of the show Cedric Lassonde's compilation of Gwoka Moderne, Lèspri Ka: New Directions in Gwoka Music from Guadeloupe 1981-2010, here: https://timecapsulespace.bandcamp.com/album/l-spri-ka-new-directions-in-gwoka-music-from-guadeloupe-1981-2010

    Books:
    CLR James - The Black Jacobins

    • 1 hr 7 min
    LITM Extra - Decolonising Disco—Counterculture, Postindustrial Creativity, the 1970s Dance Floor and Disco pt.1 [excerpt]

    LITM Extra - Decolonising Disco—Counterculture, Postindustrial Creativity, the 1970s Dance Floor and Disco pt.1 [excerpt]

    This is an excerpt of a full length episode currently only available to patrons. To become a patron and support what we're doing from £3 per month, head to www.patreon.com/LoveMessagePod.

    In this patrons-only episode Tim reads from his essay Decolonising Disco—Counterculture, Postindustrial Creativity, the 1970s Dance Floor and Disco, published recently in the collection Global Dance Cultures in the 1970s and 1980s : Disco Heterotopias, edited by Flora Pitrolo and Marko Zubak. Drawing together arguments from all three of Tim's books covering the party culture of the 1970s and early 1980s, the piece re-historises the so-called 'genre wars' of Disco, Punk and Hip Hop / Rap to better represent the fluidity between these scenes and musics as part of a city-wide music culture.

    Tim continues to assert this radical creative potential of  the post-Fordist conjuncture in '70s music culture, and concludes by asking: what happened to the influence of music from the Global South on Disco; how did Disco go from the fringes of US culture to becoming a colonializing force itself; and how might we begin decolonialising Disco?

    We've split the essay into two halves, with part two to follow in a fortnight.

    Edited and produced by Matt Huxley.

    Tune in, turn on, get down!

    Tracklist:

    Cristina - Disco Clone
    The Salsoul Orchestra - You're Just The Right Size
    The Pointer Sisters - Yes We Can Can
    Booker T and the MG's - Melting Pot
    James Brown - Give It Or Turn It Loose
    Dinosaur - Kiss Me Again
    The New York Dolls - Personality Crisis

    Books:

    Tim Lawrence - Love Saves The Day: A History of American Dance Culture, 1970-1979
    Tim Lawrence - Life and Death on the New York Dance Floor, 1980-1983
    Tim Lawrence - Hold on to Your Dreams: Arthur Russell and the Downtown Music Scene, 1973-1992
    David Harvey - A Brief History of Neoliberalism
    Anthony Haden-Guest - The Last Party: Studio 54, Disco, and the Culture of the Night
    Simon Reynolds - Rip It Up and Start Again
    Nelson George - The Death of Rhythm and Blues

    • 8 min
    LITM Extra - Heavy Dub Theory pt.3

    LITM Extra - Heavy Dub Theory pt.3

    This is an excerpt of a full length episode currently only available to patrons. To become a patron and support what we're doing from £3 per month, head to www.patreon.com/LoveMessagePod.

    In this patrons-only episode, Jeremy and Tim conclude their mini-series ‘Heavy Dub Theory’ (for now). They talk about the work of the French radical philosophers Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari, introducing three of their key concepts: the molar and the molecular; deterritorialisation and deterritorialisation; and the refrain. We then hear how these philosophical analytical ideas can be applied to Dub.

    Later in the episode we consider the changing role of the producer in Dub and the ways in which this problematised authorship; contrast dub riddims with NYC remix culture, and finally ask whether dub and reggae can be thought of as truly psychedelic musics.

    Produced and edited by Matt Huxley.

    Tracklist:

    Sound Dimension - Real Rock
    Bounty Killer - Roots, Reality and Culture
    Modern Romance - Salsa Rappsody (Dub Discomix)
    Lee ‘Scratch’ Perry - Bed Jamming
    Disco Dub Band - For the Love of Money

    • 6 min
    Music in the Cuban Revolution

    Music in the Cuban Revolution

    In this week's episode Jeremy and Tim travel to New Years Day 1959 as Che Guevara's forces defeat Batista to complete the Cuban Revolution. We hear about the military embargo imposed by the USA on their island neighbour, its impact on life for musicians on both sides of the border, and is resonances with American foreign policy in Latin America more broadly.

    Tim and Jeremy also consider the nationalisation of the Cuban record industry, the pros and cons of state sponsorship on music creation, and how Communists across the world have addressed the problem of vernacular popular music's status within the culture industry. Plus, the Cha Cha Cha source of a foundational piece of Garage Rock, the Bay of Pigs, and why cymbals were banned for being 'too jazzy'.

    Tim Lawrence and Jeremy Gilbert are authors, academics, DJs and audiophile dance party organisers. They’ve been friends and collaborators since 1997, teaching together and running parties since 2003. With clubs closed and half their jobs lost to university cuts, they’re inevitably launching a podcast.

    Produced and edited by Matt Huxley.  

    Tune in, Turn on, Get Down!

    Become a patron from as little as £3pcm by visiting www.patreon.com/LoveMessagePod

    Tracklist:
    Cuarteto D' Aida - Yo Si Tumbo Caña
    The Kings Men - Louie Louie
    René Touzet - El Loco Cha Cha Cha
    Orquesta Cubana de Música Moderna - The Man I Love
    Irakere - Bacalao Con Pan
    Grupo De Experimentación Sonora Del ICAIC - Granma
    Los Van Van - Chirrin, Chirran

    Books:
    Timothy Brennan - Secular Devotion: Afro-Latin Music and Imperial Jazz
    Ned Sublette - Cuba and its Music

    • 1 hr 21 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
63 Ratings

63 Ratings

Phil Wynn ,

Unmissable

No podcast I've ever listened to has had the impact of Love is the Message. It has encouraged me to revisit some of the recesses of my record collection (in some cases for the first time in many years) and connect with the music more deeply, thinking about it in a wider cultural and geopolitical context. It has also pointed me in the direction of some fascinating texts as well as some music I was previously only vaguely aware of. I eagerly anticipate every new episode and hope the podcast runs and runs. There are so many areas of music and dancefloor culture that I hope receive Tim and Jem's coverage and analysis. It is already forming a valuable resource that anyone with even a passing interest in cultural studies and dance music in all its forms should revisit again and again. After listening to the first episode last year I immediately became a Patreon, after a couple more I upped my monthly donation, such was the quality of the discussions. I would encourage anyone who is enjoying this to do the same and help keep LITM going.

Thanks and keep it up guys!

PS Some more guest interviews of the quality of the discussion with Daphne Brooks would be fantastic.

Glenneth Harold ,

Thank you

After reading Love Saves The Day and feeling the void since finishing, this podcast is an incredible discovery. Thank you for putting so much effort into producing this. Detailed, fascinating, just the right amount of ‘theory’, funny and of course, outstanding music. Absolutely love what you guys are doing and what you’re about. Off to Patreon now 👍

JBM LDN ,

Congratulations Tim and Jeremy

This podcast is an incredible intellectual and aesthetic resource, deep yet accessible

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