15 episodes

Autumn 2012 - UCL's Lunch Hour Lecture Series is an opportunity for anyone to sample the exceptional research work taking place at the university, in bite-size chunks. Speakers are drawn from across UCL and lectures frequently showcase new research and recent academic publications. Lunch Hour Lectures require no pre-booking, are free to attend and are open to anyone on a first-come, first-served basis.

Lunch Hour Lectures - Autumn 2012 - Video UCL - London's Global University

    • History

Autumn 2012 - UCL's Lunch Hour Lecture Series is an opportunity for anyone to sample the exceptional research work taking place at the university, in bite-size chunks. Speakers are drawn from across UCL and lectures frequently showcase new research and recent academic publications. Lunch Hour Lectures require no pre-booking, are free to attend and are open to anyone on a first-come, first-served basis.

    • video
    Apocalypse in 2012? History, myth and science - Video

    Apocalypse in 2012? History, myth and science - Video

    Did the Classic Maya really predict the end of the world on 21 December 2012? What caused them to record a date that would occur over a thousand years into their future? This lecture will review a variety of apocalyptic prophecies, specially the one for this year, in the light of scientific research into the formation, development and eventual destruction of entire solar systems, including ours.

    • 39 min
    • video
    Social physics in the big city - Video

    Social physics in the big city - Video

    We live in an era of abundant data, and more data is being opened up to the world every day. More and more of us are handing over detailed personal and location data via social media and smartphones. How can researchers use this data to model and understand the way our cities and societies work? What do physics and maths have to offer? And how can we use this data to improve people’s lives?

    • 41 min
    • video
    Those that don't drink, don’t die so fast: drink, health and insurance in Victorian Britain - Video

    Those that don't drink, don’t die so fast: drink, health and insurance in Victorian Britain - Video

    In the nineteenth century, mainstream medical opinion suggested that abstaining from alcohol was a health risk. The advent of insurance policies for abstainers helped to chip away at this certainty, as well as encouraging policyholders to think about their health. This lecture will discuss how, by the start of the twentieth century, the medical profession had begun to do very well out of insurance, despite the ambiguities of assessing drink-related problems.

    • 36 min
    • video
    Sex work today: myths, morals and health - Video

    Sex work today: myths, morals and health - Video

    What is it about exile that inspires photography? This talk explores the earliest known exile photography, created in the studio formed by Victor Hugo’s family and friends in their exile on the Channel Island of Jersey between 1852 and 1855. In these years, the Hugo group turned exile into a photographic project, and in doing so, they transformed the history of photography.

    • 41 min
    • video
    Sustainable Energy for All: this year, next year, sometime – or never? - Video

    Sustainable Energy for All: this year, next year, sometime – or never? - Video

    What does ‘sustainable energy for all’ mean? How much energy, ‘sustainable’ over what period, and who are the ‘all’? If this ambitious goal is achievable, then how can it be done, and by when? And who will pay for achieving it? To mark the UN International Year of Sustainable Energy for all, this lecture explores the environmental, economic, and social issues raised by these questions and the implications for public policy.

    • 44 min
    • video
    Presymptomatic treatment for Alzheimer’s disease: feasible or fanciful? - Video

    Presymptomatic treatment for Alzheimer’s disease: feasible or fanciful? - Video

    Alzheimer’s disease affects an estimated 400,000 people in the UK – that number will double over coming decades without treatments to delay or prevent disease. We are now able to ‘see’ the earliest brain changes of Alzheimer’s disease, which can appear years before first symptoms, opening up the possibility of presymptomatic trials. With serial imaging and videos of patients and at-risk individuals this lecture considers the potential and problems for such trials.

    • 30 min

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