15 min

"Metronomes and Tuning Forks Should Be Banished to Outer Space!" E:314 with Paul Edmund-Davies Talking Flutes

    • Music Interviews

In the realm of music, the flute holds a special place, weaving melodies that can be both hauntingly beautiful and strikingly powerful. In the latest episode of Talking Flutes, we revisit a gem from our archives featuring none other than the renowned flute player Paul Edmund-Davies. His insights into the world of flute playing are as refreshing as they are provocative, challenging the norms and urging us to look forward rather than backward for inspiration.
The conversation plunges into the depths of musical education and its evolution. Paul, with his rich experience and candid demeanour, discusses the revered French school of flute playing, paying homage to its greats like Taffanel, Gobert, Moyse, and Rampal. Yet, he insists that while the past is to be respected, it is the present that should be seized. He argues that fixation on historical methods may hinder our own creative expression and growth as musicians.
Listeners are treated to a sneak peek into Edmund-Davies' own struggles and triumphs with the instrument. He shares the origin story of his '28 Day Warm Up Book', born out of a personal quest to overcome technical hurdles on the flute. His approach to finger independence is as enlightening as it is practical, emphasising the need for exercises that strengthen the fingers in both directions.
The episode is sprinkled with humour and wisdom, as Edmund-Davies draws parallels between musical performance and storytelling, insisting that each note should be treated as a word in an unfolding narrative. He also touches on the controversial topic of metronomes and tuning machines, which he humorously suggests should be banished to outer space. His rationale? These tools, while useful, can become crutches that prevent musicians from developing their innate sense of timing and pitch.
Paul Edmund-Davies' philosophy extends beyond technique to the very essence of music-making. He advocates for a practice that is musically driven rather than mechanically repetitive, one that takes the audience on a journey. His views on performance anxiety and the quest for constant innovation in interpreting familiar pieces are particularly resonant.
The episode concludes with a call to action for all musicians to bring life to every piece of music they touch, making the familiar unfamiliar and the mundane magical. It's a powerful message that resonates with anyone who has ever picked up an instrument or been moved by a melody.
For those who wish to dive deeper into the conversation, the full podcast is available, promising to be as musically fulfilling as the excerpt suggests. So, whether you're a seasoned flutist or simply someone who appreciates the beauty of music, this episode of Talking Flutes is not to be missed. Tune in to episode 117, "Metronomes and Tuning Forks Should Be Banished to Outer Space," and let your musical horizons expand.
Remember, as the host bids us farewell, may your week be filled with harmonious discoveries, and may your own third octave f sharp find its perfect resonance.
'Talking Flutes', 'Talking Flutes Extra', 'Bitesize' and 'Revisited' are podcast productions by the TJ flute company.  For more information visit www.tjflutes.com 

In the realm of music, the flute holds a special place, weaving melodies that can be both hauntingly beautiful and strikingly powerful. In the latest episode of Talking Flutes, we revisit a gem from our archives featuring none other than the renowned flute player Paul Edmund-Davies. His insights into the world of flute playing are as refreshing as they are provocative, challenging the norms and urging us to look forward rather than backward for inspiration.
The conversation plunges into the depths of musical education and its evolution. Paul, with his rich experience and candid demeanour, discusses the revered French school of flute playing, paying homage to its greats like Taffanel, Gobert, Moyse, and Rampal. Yet, he insists that while the past is to be respected, it is the present that should be seized. He argues that fixation on historical methods may hinder our own creative expression and growth as musicians.
Listeners are treated to a sneak peek into Edmund-Davies' own struggles and triumphs with the instrument. He shares the origin story of his '28 Day Warm Up Book', born out of a personal quest to overcome technical hurdles on the flute. His approach to finger independence is as enlightening as it is practical, emphasising the need for exercises that strengthen the fingers in both directions.
The episode is sprinkled with humour and wisdom, as Edmund-Davies draws parallels between musical performance and storytelling, insisting that each note should be treated as a word in an unfolding narrative. He also touches on the controversial topic of metronomes and tuning machines, which he humorously suggests should be banished to outer space. His rationale? These tools, while useful, can become crutches that prevent musicians from developing their innate sense of timing and pitch.
Paul Edmund-Davies' philosophy extends beyond technique to the very essence of music-making. He advocates for a practice that is musically driven rather than mechanically repetitive, one that takes the audience on a journey. His views on performance anxiety and the quest for constant innovation in interpreting familiar pieces are particularly resonant.
The episode concludes with a call to action for all musicians to bring life to every piece of music they touch, making the familiar unfamiliar and the mundane magical. It's a powerful message that resonates with anyone who has ever picked up an instrument or been moved by a melody.
For those who wish to dive deeper into the conversation, the full podcast is available, promising to be as musically fulfilling as the excerpt suggests. So, whether you're a seasoned flutist or simply someone who appreciates the beauty of music, this episode of Talking Flutes is not to be missed. Tune in to episode 117, "Metronomes and Tuning Forks Should Be Banished to Outer Space," and let your musical horizons expand.
Remember, as the host bids us farewell, may your week be filled with harmonious discoveries, and may your own third octave f sharp find its perfect resonance.
'Talking Flutes', 'Talking Flutes Extra', 'Bitesize' and 'Revisited' are podcast productions by the TJ flute company.  For more information visit www.tjflutes.com 

15 min