10 episodes

In My Queer Life I talk about the everyday issues and challenges I face as an LGBT person. Expect me to talk about all things lesbian, gay, gender fluidity, transgender and non-binary. If you have any thing you want me to talk about specifically, let me know!

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Gina Battye is a world-renowned Authenticity, Psychological Safety and LGBT+ Inclusion Consultant and Trainer for Multinational Corporations, Fortune 500s, TV, Film and the Global Press.

For more about Gina visit https://www.ginabattye.com

My Queer Life Gina Battye

    • Sexuality

In My Queer Life I talk about the everyday issues and challenges I face as an LGBT person. Expect me to talk about all things lesbian, gay, gender fluidity, transgender and non-binary. If you have any thing you want me to talk about specifically, let me know!

---

Gina Battye is a world-renowned Authenticity, Psychological Safety and LGBT+ Inclusion Consultant and Trainer for Multinational Corporations, Fortune 500s, TV, Film and the Global Press.

For more about Gina visit https://www.ginabattye.com

    How To Survive Christmas With Your Family: LGBT Style

    How To Survive Christmas With Your Family: LGBT Style

    * As featured in Diva Magazine, Curve Magazine and Mind Body Network
    How do you stay relaxed with your loved ones over Christmas?
    Add unsupportive or homophobic, transphobic, biphobic and interphobic parents, siblings and family and taking your partner with you for the holidays, and what do you get?
    The potential of losing it with your loved ones and attempting to get through the holiday season without a family fight.
    Here’s Your Survival Guide For Christmas, or any holiday period with your family.
    1. Self-care. Look after yourself before, during and after your trip. Exercise, reading, writing, meditation, being social, massage. Whatever self-care looks like for you, do it. And listen, don’t stay sat in one place. Get some fresh air, move about and limit the alcohol.
    2. Prepare yourself for any questions that tend to come up at family gatherings. The usual ones: partner, marriage, kids, job. Know how you will respond to these. By doing this you will boost your confidence and reduce the anxiety you may be feeling. Be clear with yourself about how much information you want to divulge. Do you really need to go into that much detail about your current dating situation or sex life with Uncle Bob for instance?
    3. Triggers. Stay away from topics of discussion that trigger disputes. You know the ones…
    4. What to do WHEN you are triggered. When you are triggered, acknowledge it, breathe into it and feel the emotion. Don’t react or respond in that moment. Simply be. You learn so much about yourself in these moments of vulnerability.
    5. Be kind and extend compassion to everyone – more so in those moments where you feel triggered. Instead of reacting, be curious. Coming from a place of curiosity feels totally different than when you come from a place of anger and frustration. Try it.
    6. Stay present. Don’t let your mind wander into things that happened in the past or worrying about what the future may hold. Be here, now. Enjoy this moment.
    7. If you feel it is getting too much, excuse yourself for 5-10 minutes. Offer to make a hot drink for everyone. Go to the bathroom. Stick your head out of the door and breathe in some fresh air. Offer to do an emergency run for more crisps or napkins. You can never have too many napkins, right?
    Embrace these 7 simple principles and ideas and I guarantee a holiday period filled with love, light and laughter.
    Happy holidays!

    LGBT+, Psychological Safety, Intersectionality * Consultancy * Training * For Fortune 500s + Multinational Corporations.
    For more information about the work Gina does with organisations click here
    Please email hello@ginabattye.com to discuss your requirements.


    Subscribe for more: Blog | Facebook | LinkedIn | Twitter | YouTube  | Instagram | ITunes

    • 6 min
    The Hidden Impact Of Other People’s Words (and how to release them)

    The Hidden Impact Of Other People’s Words (and how to release them)

    Did You Hear Any Of These Messages As A Child?

    Go to school and get an education.
    Don’t go near the fire!
    You can’t have ice-cream unless you eat your greens.
    Money doesn’t grow on trees.
    Go to the doctors if you feel unwell.
    Respect your elders.
    You are rubbish at art/maths/spelling.
    Success looks like a big house, a spouse, kids, dog, goldfish and white picket fence.
    You need to save up for the latest iPhone, Xbox and shiny new laptop.

     
    Your Belief System
    By the age of around 6-7 years old, your belief system has been formed from what you heard and experienced around you.
    Imagine.
    You have been hearing those messages from a young age.
    Those messages are going to seep into your subconscious mind. They are going to sit there and form what you believe to be true.
    As a child, and later as an adult.
    What you believe to be true today as an adult is a result of the social conditioning and messages you heard as a young child.
    Think about how old you are now.
    How many years have you been living your life with the beliefs that were formed when you were 6 years old?
    Your life right now (unless you have worked on your beliefs and you have done some inner work) is being lived and experienced based on your 6 year old beliefs.
    Your beliefs (which are simply thoughts you keep thinking) create your experience. They affect how you feel, who you are, how you behave and what your experience is of the world.
    Unless you are aware of your beliefs and have worked on them, chances are you are living your life through your 6 year old self eyes.
     
    Most Common Beliefs
    Here are the most common beliefs formed as a result of social conditioning:

    I’m worthless.
    I’m going to be found out.
    I’m unlovable.
    I don’t deserve / am not worthy of … (success, love, happiness etc.)
    There is something wrong with me.
    I’m different (results in comparing yourself to others).
    I can’t be my real self or I’ll be judged.
    Everything is my fault.
    Fear of abandonment/rejection.
    I’m a failure.

    When you dig deeper into these, they all point to the same thing; there is one belief that underlies all of these.
    I’m not good enough.
     
    The Masks You Wear and Authenticity
    You show up wearing different masks for different environments and situations that you find yourself in. Work, in business, relationships, socially, on the school run – you name it, you have a mask for it.
    These masks originate from thought. From how we think.
    Let me tell you what I know about thinking.
    As soon as your conscious awareness identifies with the content of your thoughts, you start actively thinking. Processing. Making stories and attaching to the thoughts. When you start thinking in this way, you have engaged the ego. That thinking might be in the form of a judgement about yourself, the way you want to present yourself, the pattern of thinking that there is something wrong with you or that you are not good enough.
    So what do you do? 
    You create a mask to hide the real you.
    Because all you want, is to fit in. And to be accepted.
    The social conditioning and words you heard as a child, your old belief systems, judgements others have made about you, the criticisms you hear, the labels you carry (lesbian, non-binary, shy, mother, etc) – all of this builds up layer upon layer to form your identity.
    Your identity is a culmination of all the things you have ‘acquired’ over the years that hide who you really are.
    And now, these layers drive the patterns of thought you have on a day to day basis.
    As soon as you identify with thought, you are no longer who you really are and there is a filter of judgement from within. That’s not authentic, it’s not real and all it does is distance you from the real you.
    We have around 80,000 thoughts a day. The majority of those are the exact same thoughts that you thought yesterday.
    The content of your thoughts limit you throughout the

    • 7 min
    How To Support A Trans Person (At Work & Home)

    How To Support A Trans Person (At Work & Home)

    * As featured in Diva Magazine, Curve Magazine, Lesbians On The Loose, Thrive Global, Mind Body Network

    When someone comes out to you as Transgender – how do you respond?
    Here are 3 things to be aware of AND 10 things you can do to support a Trans person – both at work and at home.




    Imagine this. You have a colleague at work that asks to speak with you. They have something they want to tell you. Something that you need to know about them. Alone together, they tell you they are transgender and are going to transition.
    How do you respond?
    Here are 3 things to be aware of.
    Firstly, consider all those years they have been dealing with gender dysphoria, confusion, distress, turmoil, trauma of going through the ‘wrong’ puberty, isolation, keeping a secret and pretending to be someone else – so they can be accepted.
    Next, bear in mind that coming out is not a thing to be taken lightly. That moment of coming out is a sacred one. This is not a phase they are going through. This is the result of many sleepless nights and years of confusion, turmoil, distress, struggle and anxiety. That moment with you is the culmination of many hours of deliberating the exact words to use, the appropriate timing and potential reactions. When someone ‘officially’ comes out they are not saying those words for the first time. They have practised for months, maybe years, worried about the reaction they might receive.
    And finally, they have a million and one thoughts and fears running through their head right now. The fear of being rejected or being accepted and the impact it will have on their relationships (including yours). Fear of violence, prejudice, judgements and discrimination. Anxiety about ‘passing’ and how convincing they will be to others. Fears and concerns about the medical interventions that lie ahead. The frustration of changing legal documents and having to explain to many strangers their situation so they can successfully transition.
    How can you support them?
    Here are 10 things you can do to support a Trans person – both at work and at home.

    Congratulate them and acknowledge their courage. It is a significant moment for them to have a conversation with you about it. Acknowledge that.


    Talk to them about it. Find out more about their journey and the path they want to go down for their transition. Every individual’s transition is different.


    Ask what their concerns are and how you can support them. Let them know you are there for them and if they want to talk about anything, the door is always open.


    If you have any questions, ask them. Ask about pronouns, their name and when they want to start using their choice of pronouns and name. Stay clear of personal, intimate and inappropriate questions.


    Be ‘normal’ with them. There is no need to change your behaviour, the way you talk to them or your work-based requests.


    If someone has come out to you, that doesn’t mean they are ready to come out to everyone. Don’t ‘out’ them to others or share information they have told you in confidence. Let them be the one to tell who they choose to tell and when they are ready.


    Be their ally. Make the effort to educate yourself about trans issues – so your colleague doesn’t have to and so you can be a better ally. If someone is having an inappropriate conversation about them, speak up. If you notice any form of discrimination, report it. If someone is asking them inappropriate questions, tell them.


    Relax about same-sex spaces (such as the bathrooms). Welcome them into those areas.


    Invite them along to same sex events. That way they won’t have to feel uncomfortable asking if they can come along.


    Celebrate with them on international and national transgender holidays, such as International Transgender Day of Visibility (in March).

    Remember, coming out and transitioning is a big step for an individual. Wh

    • 7 min
    What NOT To Say To A Trans Person

    What NOT To Say To A Trans Person

    * As featured in Diva Magazine, Curve Magazine, Lesbians On The Loose, Thrive Global, Mind Body Network
    When someone comes out to you as being transgender what is the best thing to say and how can you support that person?
    After all, the last thing you want to do is cause any offence or upset them in any way.
    
    There are 4 things you might say that can potentially cause offence.
    Number One. Never refer to being transgender as ‘a choice.’ Being transgender is not a choice. You wouldn’t choose to live
    your life in a way that risked you facing daily abuse, discrimination and prejudice. You wouldn’t choose to undergo gender reassignment surgery and the years of anxiety and distress that arises whilst you await your surgery. Coming out as transgender, transitioning and worrying about ‘passing’ everyday, that isn’t a choice.
    Most transgender individuals describe an innate knowing that their gender identity differs from the one they were assigned at birth. Think of it like having a female brain in a male body or vice-versa. They have progressed through their life with people around them expecting them to be and act like a boy/girl, when inside they feel to be a girl/boy. Transgender individuals learn very early on in life to hide the true person they really are so they can fit in and be accepted.
    Gender dysphoria causes extreme distress. The Stonewall School Report 2017 highlighted that 48% of transgender people under 26 years old have attempted suicide and 59% have considered doing so. More than four in five trans young people have self-harmed. Being transgender is most definitely not a choice.
    Number Two. Don’t use the incorrect pronouns. Rather than worry about saying the wrong thing or avoiding the person to be sure you don’t ‘get it wrong’ – ask them what pronouns to use and when they want to start using them. Share your pronouns too! You can also use gender neutral pronouns (they/them), for instance “I know Gina. They work in Finance.” In the early days, you may make an occasional mistake. Correct yourself and move on. Don’t make a big deal out of it – you will just make it worse.
    Number Three. Don’t ask insensitive questions and say something you know will upset the person. If they have come out to you, they have a relationship with you and trust you. Read the situation and consider what may be inappropriate to ask them. Questions about genitals, lower surgery and sexual preferences are definite no-go conversations in the office, maybe ever. Respect that.
    Number Four. Don’t ask their previous name. They don’t identify as that gender and won’t appreciate the reminder.
    There you go. What NOT to say to a trans person. Hope you found that useful!
     
    Need Support With Trans Issues In Your Organisation?
    I work with organisations around Trans issues.

    How to Support A Trans Co-Worker – tips and strategies to support a transgender co-worker – before, during and after transitioning. This is a one hour workshop for your team/organisation, delivered in-house. £200 + expenses. Email hello@ginabattye.com with suggested dates for delivery.


    Specialist Support: I work with you to support individuals who are/have come out at work, their teams and the HR department during transition (making sure they have policies in place to support etc).

    If you would like to chat about the work I do around this and how I can support your organisation, email me: hello@ginabattye.com.
    About Gina Battye

    Described as “The Best of Louise Hay and Ellen DeGeneres”, Gina Battye is an internationally sought after LGBT authenticity coach, celebrity interviewer, TV Show Host and award-winning LGBT speaker.
    Working with clients (both through 121 support and through group training and workshops) Gina, the leading voice for LGBT self help, is on a mission to help more of the LGBT community live their authentic live

    • 5 min
    3 Steps To Authenticity

    3 Steps To Authenticity

    Want to know how to be authentic, drop the masks you wear and show up as the real and authentic you in your life?

    Here are the 3 Steps To Authenticity
    Step 1. Is all about raising your awareness. Raise your awareness of how you currently present yourself to the world.
    Step 2. Is all about releasing. Release all the old beliefs, conditioning, patterns and judgements that you internalised over the years.
    Step 3. Is all about re-connecting. Reconnect to who you REALLY are, your Authentic and True self, and what you are here to do.
    There you go. They are the 3 steps to authenticity. How to be authentic and what to do to show up as the real and authentic you in your life and work.
    In my signature authenticity training programme I take you through all 3 of the steps to authenticity in so much depth.
    If you’re not a do-it-yourselfer and you are ready to become more authentic in your life and work, check out the Authenticity Training I offer and lets talk about working together!
    Full details are here: http://www.ginabattye.com/courses.
    About Gina Battye

    Described as “The Best of Louise Hay and Ellen DeGeneres”, Gina Battye is an internationally sought after authenticity coach, teacher and award-winning LGBT speaker.
    Gina reconnects individuals to their Authentic Self & is the leading voice for LGBT self help.
    Through her work as a regular columnist for leading LGBT magazines worldwide and TV show host Gina is advising, mentoring and transforming the lives of thousands of LGBT individuals around the world.

    Subscribe for more:  Celebrity Interviews |Facebook  |  Instagram  |  YouTube  |  ITunes |  Blog  |  LinkedIn  |  Twitter |

    • 2 min
    The 5 Signs Of A Truly Authentic Person

    The 5 Signs Of A Truly Authentic Person

    * As featured in Diva Magazine, Curve Magazine, Lesbians On The Loose, Mind Body Network, Thrive Global
    We show up wearing different masks for different environments and situations we find ourselves in.
    Work, in business, relationships, socially, on the school run – you name it, we have a mask for it.
    Authenticity on the school run? Unheard of. In business – rare. Socially? Maybe after a drink or three. Seriously, I can’t think of anywhere where I don’t see people wearing a mask.

    We don’t want to look stupid, wrong, like a failure, an imposter or vulnerable in any way. So what do we do? We tweak how we present ourselves to protect, to fit in and to be accepted.
    These masks originate from thought. From how we think.
    Let me tell you what I know about thinking.
    As soon as your conscious awareness identifies with the content of your thoughts, you start actively thinking. Processing. Making stories and attaching to the thoughts. When you start thinking in this way, you have engaged the ego. That thinking might be in the form of a judgement about yourself, the way you want to present yourself, the pattern of thinking that there is something wrong with you or that you are not good enough.
    The social conditioning, old belief systems, judgements, the criticisms, labels you carry – all these build up layer upon layer to form your identity. Your identity is a culmination of all the things you have ‘acquired’ over the years that hide who you really are. And now, these layers drive the patterns of thought you have on a day to day basis.
    As soon as you identify with thought, you are no longer who you really are and there is a filter of judgement from within. That’s not authentic, it’s not real and all it does is distance you from the real you.
    Your thoughts limit you throughout the day and distance you from the real, authentic you that is inside.
    When you let go of thought and let it drift off and when you let go of the patterns of your thinking, you reveal who you truly are. Your true personality.
    Getting back to the stillness within, that is where the authenticity comes through.
    From there you can only communicate truth. There is no possibility for judgement. From there everything is authentic.
    Communicate from this still, profound place, for this is who you truly are.
    I have noticed over the years that truly authentic people have it all together in terms of their thinking. They are aware of their thinking patterns and how to access the stillness inside and they communicate from their authentic, true self.
    Here are 5 signs of a truly authentic person:

    They feel at peace within themselves


    They are calm, even under difficult circumstances or in demanding situations


    They are confident in all areas of their life – it quietly oozes out of their pores


    They walk into a room and have an inner power emanating from them – it is so real that others notice it.


    Life feels easy and in flow for them. They manifest easily and quickly. No effort. No striving.

    Which of these do you recognise in others and which do you see in yourself?
    When you drop the masks you wear and let your thoughts drift by (without connecting to them), you access that stillness inside of you.
    This is where authenticity lies.
    Communicate from this space and you will notice profound differences in all aspects of your life. Trust me.
    About Gina Battye

    Described as “The Best of Louise Hay and Ellen DeGeneres”, Gina Battye is an internationally sought after authenticity coach, teacher and award-winning LGBT speaker.
    Gina reconnects individuals to their Authentic Self & is the leading voice for LGBT self help.
    Through her work as a regular columnist for leading LGBT magazines worldwide and TV show host Gina is advising, mentoring and transforming the lives of thousands of LGBT individuals around the world.

    Subscribe for more: Facebook 

    • 2 min

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