500 episodes

Features packaged stories from NATO reporters around the globe. Provided in high definition by NATO TV. Check out NATOs Web-based television channel at www.natochannel.tv

NATO-TV DVIDS

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Features packaged stories from NATO reporters around the globe. Provided in high definition by NATO TV. Check out NATOs Web-based television channel at www.natochannel.tv

    • video
    5 things you need when you camp in the cold (master)

    5 things you need when you camp in the cold (master)

    SYNOPSIS
    Norwegians are well-practised in making camps in cold weather. Here Private Sondre Guerdalen from the Norwegian Army’s 1st Armoured Battalion reveals how he and his unit build a camp to deal with the freezing cold temperatures.

    Footage includes various shots of Private Sondre Guerdalen giving a tour of his camp. Please note that footage does not include typical COVID-19 precautions because filming took place before the pandemic.

    TRANSCRIPT

    TEXT ON SCREEN
    5 THINGS YOU NEED WHEN YOU CAMP IN THE COLD

    Private Sondre Guerdalen
    1st Armoured Battalion, Norwegian Army

    SOUNDBITE
    PRIVATE SONDRE GUERDALEN, 1ST ARMOURED BATTALION, NORWEGIAN ARMY
    “Hello, my name is Private Sondre, and this is how we make a camp in the cold.”

    TEXT ON SCREEN
    #1 A TENT

    SOUNDBITE
    PRIVATE SONDRE GUERDALEN, 1ST ARMOURED BATTALION, NORWEGIAN ARMY
    “This is our tent. At the moment we’re eight people in it. Some say it can be up to 16 people but I wouldn’t want to do that.”

    TEXT ON SCREEN
    #2 AN OVEN

    SOUNDBITE
    PRIVATE SONDRE GUERDALEN, 1ST ARMOURED BATTALION
    “We have the oven. Obviously the most important thing to keep us warm in the winter.”

    TEXT ON SCREEN
    #3 A KNIFE

    SOUNDBITE
    PRIVATE SONDRE GUERDALEN, 1ST ARMOURED BATTALION
    “This is our campfire. Obviously very important to keep warm, especially in the cold winter.”

    TEXT ON SCREEN
    #5 MARSHMALLOWS

    SOUNDBITE
    “Marshmallows. Lots of sugar. Tastes sweet. Motivation in a bag.”

    • video
    Slovak Special Forces compete in Warrior Competition (master)

    Slovak Special Forces compete in Warrior Competition (master)

    --SYNOPSIS--

    Welcome to the Warrior Competition, a tournament where counter-terrorism experts from around the world gather to test their skills. Held in Amman, Jordan, the most recent competition hosted 37 teams, including a team from Slovakia’s 5th Special Forces Regiment. Follow the Slovak Special Forces team as they run, rappel and shoot their way through the competition, showing what it takes to stand among NATO’s elite soldiers. Along the way, two Slovak operators reflect on the competition and how their skills help the Alliance counter terrorism.

    --TRANSCRIPT--

    VOICEOVER (English) Outside of Amman, Jordan, counter-terrorism experts from around the world gather to test their skills in a series of intense trials. The Warrior Competition brings together teams from dozens of countries, including Special Forces operators from NATO Allies. VOICEOVER (English) Among the NATO teams were the Slovak 5th Special Forces Regiment, a veteran of NATO counter-terrorism operations in Afghanistan. TEXT ON SCREEN Master Sergeant “Marek” Slovak Special Forces SOUNDBITE (English) Master Sergeant “Marek”, Slovak Special Forces “For us, it is the first time here in Jordan, so everything is new for us. It is a quite tough competition. It tests most of the skills that Special Forces operators need to have.” TEXT ON SCREEN Captain “Jozef” Slovak Special Forces SOUNDBITE (English) Captain “Jozef”, Slovak Special Forces “All skills we train here, can be used in the counter-terrorism operation.” VOICEOVER (English) During the competition, the teams had to complete a timed hike, shoot with precision while moving, and engage targets up to 300m away after scaling a vertical wall. SOUNDBITE (English) Captain “Jozef,” Slovak Special Forces “We want to compare our skills to other teams from all over the world. And compare our tactics, techniques and things like that.” VOICEOVER (English) In Jordan, their task was simple: excel under pressure and pain. Being a Special Operator means pushing your mind and body to their absolute limits and never quitting, no matter how hard it gets. SOUNDBITE (English) Captain “Jozef,” Slovak Special Forces “In our Special Forces, we have a motto: crescit in adversis virtus”. In hardship, courage grows.” END

    • video
    Příjemné svátky od nás všech v NATO

    Příjemné svátky od nás všech v NATO

    V letošním roce jsme všichni museli dělat věci jinak a svátky nejsou výjimkou. Stále jsme ale nacházeli způsoby jak zůstat spolu. Všichni v NATO vám přejeme příjemné svátky. Po cvičení v zasněžených horách Islandu se tým EOD vrací na základnu. Cestou míjí nápisy připomínající nutnost "zachovávat odstup" kvůli pandemii COVID-19, a tak se tým vrací na pracoviště poněkud sklíčený. Jak si bezpečně užít svátků? Situaci zachrání robot týmu EOD, který přijde s unikátním způsobem jak šířit sváteční náladu – samozřejmě při zachování bezpečného odstupu. Video obsahuje záběry z cvičení islandského týmu EOD a jeho pobytu na základně.

    • video
    L’OTAN vous souhaite d’excellentes fêtes de fin d’année

    L’OTAN vous souhaite d’excellentes fêtes de fin d’année

    Nous avons dû faire les choses autrement cette année, et la saison des fêtes ne fera pas exception. Nous avons pourtant trouvé différents moyens d’être ensemble. Le moment est venu de vous souhaiter d’excellentes fêtes de fin d’année ! Après s’être entraînée dans les montagnes enneigées d’Islande, une équipe EOD revient à la base. Chacun passe devant la signalétique COVID-19 et s’installe à son bureau, la mine un peu abattue, se demandant comment profiter des vacances en toute sécurité. Mais le robot EOD les surprend et recrée la magie des fêtes à sa façon, à bonne distance, bien entendu. La séquence montre l’équipe EOD en train de s’entraîner à l’extérieur, puis de retour à la base.

    • video
    NATO Science: The Next-Generation Incident Command System (master)

    NATO Science: The Next-Generation Incident Command System (master)

    --SYNOPSIS--

    When first responders come together in an international disaster response force, they need to share information quickly – between military and civilians, and across borders and languages. NATO has supported the adaptation of a software platform in the Western Balkans, in which maps, videos and pictures can all be shared in real time. It’s called the Next-Generation Incident Command System, or NICS for short, and has been developed by scientists at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in the United States. The system has been put to use in managing wildfires in California and Australia, and is being deployed across the Western Balkans. In this episode of NATO Science, we travel to Montenegro, where NATO scientists conduct live trials of the system in a simulated emergency situation. Footage includes NICS creator Gregg Hogan explaining how the system works, as well as various shots of the NICS system in use, firefighters from various countries battling barrel fires as part of an exercise scenario, shots of the exercise command centre, and Montenegrin aeroplanes dousing water on simulated bushfires. Please note that exercise footage does not include typical COVID-19 precautions because filming took place before the pandemic.

    --TRANSCRIPT--

    SOUNDBITE (ENGLISH) Dylan White Oh, hi! If you get your updates from one of these, you’ll know how fast information flows. For first responders, quick access to that information can save lives. How? NATO Science! THE NORTH ATLANTIC TREATY ORGANIZATION Presents NATO SCIENCE THE NEXT-GENERATION INCIDENT COMMAND SYSTEM WITH DYLAN P. WHITE SOUNDBITE (ENGLISH) Dylan White Emergencies don’t respect borders. So when first responders need to communicate across countries and organisations, they need a simple system that works quickly. Our scientists have come up with a handy solution. Project: Next-Generation Incident Command System Participants: United States, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Croatia, Montenegro, North Macedonia Supported by the NATO Science for Peace and Security Programme Gregory Hogan, Programme Manager, MIT Lincoln Laboratory, United States SOUNDBITE (ENGLISH) Gregg Hogan, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Lincoln Laboratory One of the fundamental problems of any kind of disaster response, firefighting, floods, earthquakes, is that many organisations come together that normally don’t work together, so they don’t always know how to communicate or collaborate. We developed a software platform where everybody can join together and develop ways to share information that they normally don’t know how to share. Maps, videos, pictures, all in real time. We call it the Next-Generation Incident Command System, or NICS for short. SOUNDBITE (ENGLISH) Dylan White Snappy name, but how does it work? SOUNDBITE (ENGLISH) Gregg Hogan At the core of NICS is the incident map that displays key information such as incident perimeters, evacuation zones, weather conditions, responder locations and images from the scene. Emergency personnel upload the content directly using either a web-based system or a mobile app. There’s even online spaces where responders can chat with each other in real time. Severe storm warning for local evac. Evac locations updated… please proceed with caution Image uploaded – Evac ETA 15 mins SOUNDBITE (ENGLISH) Gregg Hogan The system has been successfully put to use in the United States, including to help fight wildfires in Californaia, and has been adopted by emergency services in the state of Victoria in Australia, where it has helped more than 1000 firefighters battle over 50 bushfires. With support from the NATO Science for Peace and Security Programme, we are introducing the platform in the Western Balkans, to support regional responses to man-made and natural disasters. We recently tested the system in Montenegro during a NAT

    • video
    “Shoot and scoot” training with the Dutch and Lithuanian artillery (master)

    “Shoot and scoot” training with the Dutch and Lithuanian artillery (master)

    --SYNOPSIS--

    A Dutch mobile artillery unit assigned to NATO’s enhanced Forward Presence Battlegroup in Lithuania recently conducted a live-fire exercise at Pabradė Training Grounds alongside their Lithuanian counterparts. With their ability to “shoot and scoot” – conduct fire missions and then quickly move to cover – mobile artillery plays a crucial role in many Allied militaries. For this exercise, the Dutch and Lithuanians used Panzer Howitzer 2000-NL self-propelled guns to practise this critical capability. Forward observers from Germany and Norway helped coordinate the strikes. Footage includes shots of Dutch and Lithuanian Panzer Howitzers firing and moving, as well as interviews with a Dutch artillery commander.

    --TRANSCRIPT--

    SOUNDBITE IN ENGLISH CAPTAIN BOB, 41 ARTILLERY BATTALION, ROYAL NETHERLANDS ARMY “The real power of the Panzer Howitzer is that it’s able to do ”shoot and scoot” operations. In general, that means that it can be in a hiding position, deep inside the woods, it gets a fire mission, it drives out to a firing position, it fires a few rounds, and then heads back to another hiding position. So it does not need to be static at one place at one time.” “Even if there is COVID or no COVID, we need to make sure that we stand together, and we stand together strong.” END

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