7 episodes

Every episode we’ll delve deep to explore what is most occupying the thoughts and feelings of some of the most successful social leaders, as they attempt to lead teams, organisations and major initiatives that are changing the world. What do they dream about, what keeps them awake at night, what gets them out of bed in the morning; what are their biggest fears and ambitions for the future? What are they learning about leadership – and themselves? Where do they find the greatest cause for hope ...The program seeks to understand what of the core ingredients for great leadership - for anyone concerned about doing social good. Ultimately this is a people business – it’s all about inspiring, motivating, connecting, engaging and empowering people to change the world. Which asks much of those who choose to lead. It means juggling multiple bottomlines: worrying about meeting the needs of the people whose cause we serve AND the needs of our supporters AND the needs of our partners/allies AND all the many demands of compliance/regulation AND public/political opinion AND trying to keep raising enough cash to keep the wholeship afloat ... AND crucially, leading professional teams of incredibly committed, passionate and determined staff that often see their job as their vocation.... All of which requires in leaders, a huge amount of personal strength, confidence and resilience. But where does that come from? How much of leadership is innate, versus skills to be learned? How do you manage those crises of confidence and be kind to yourself, as well as offering the leadership those around you need most?This podcast attempts to capture and learn from the wisdom and experience of CEOs, Directors, Founders and Leaders in charities, social enterprises, politics and grassroots organisations - to share more widely, and hopefully inspire others to grow in their own leadership. There is a lot in the world that needs changing, and we need great leadership now more than ever

On The Mind Of Joe Jenkins

    • Non-Profit
    • 5.0 • 13 Ratings

Every episode we’ll delve deep to explore what is most occupying the thoughts and feelings of some of the most successful social leaders, as they attempt to lead teams, organisations and major initiatives that are changing the world. What do they dream about, what keeps them awake at night, what gets them out of bed in the morning; what are their biggest fears and ambitions for the future? What are they learning about leadership – and themselves? Where do they find the greatest cause for hope ...The program seeks to understand what of the core ingredients for great leadership - for anyone concerned about doing social good. Ultimately this is a people business – it’s all about inspiring, motivating, connecting, engaging and empowering people to change the world. Which asks much of those who choose to lead. It means juggling multiple bottomlines: worrying about meeting the needs of the people whose cause we serve AND the needs of our supporters AND the needs of our partners/allies AND all the many demands of compliance/regulation AND public/political opinion AND trying to keep raising enough cash to keep the wholeship afloat ... AND crucially, leading professional teams of incredibly committed, passionate and determined staff that often see their job as their vocation.... All of which requires in leaders, a huge amount of personal strength, confidence and resilience. But where does that come from? How much of leadership is innate, versus skills to be learned? How do you manage those crises of confidence and be kind to yourself, as well as offering the leadership those around you need most?This podcast attempts to capture and learn from the wisdom and experience of CEOs, Directors, Founders and Leaders in charities, social enterprises, politics and grassroots organisations - to share more widely, and hopefully inspire others to grow in their own leadership. There is a lot in the world that needs changing, and we need great leadership now more than ever

    Ep6 – Polly Neate, Chief Executive of Shelter

    Ep6 – Polly Neate, Chief Executive of Shelter

    Today’s guest is Polly Neate, Chief Exec of the homelessness and housing charity Shelter which exists to defend the right to a safe home.  Before Shelter, Polly was chief executive of Women's Aid, the national charity working to end violence against women and children, before which she had worked at Action for Children and been editor of Community Care magazine.



    Starting out her professional career as a journalist, Polly has contributed to many national newspapers, magazines and books.  Alongside regularly writing for the Guardian, Telegraph and Huffington Post, Polly is prolific on social media, winning “Best CEO on Social Media 2019” at the Social CEO Awards.



    In this episode, we explore how Polly’s feminism intersects with anti-racism and the frustrations of white middle-class complacency in the charity sector - especially when catching yourself.  Polly openly shares her personal regret that she has not been more proactive in tackling anti-racism since joining Shelter, and the privilege to be able to choose which days to think about racism.



    We talk about how Shelter are engaging in learning and auditing themselves to embrace their role as an authentic social justice organisation, and explore how being a good communicator, sticking to purpose and selling your organisation are all key factors as a CEO. Polly believes that it’s not enough to use your power kindly, you have to give some away for true change to be made.



    We hear how being CEO of a women’s charity can make it more difficult to open doors and be heard (not just seen as a ranty feminist!) while the vast majority of men don’t want to hear how male violence is killing women at a rate of 2 a week; and the cross-over with the tone-deafness on anti-racism issues.



    We learn that despite what people think, Polly doesn’t actually spend all her time on social media, how Zoom meetings aren’t really her style and how she is all about disco!



    Naturally optimistic, her hopes and aims for the future are to create change in the community and crucially, win the battle for more social housing.  Polly is enthusiastic about all that young people have to offer and strongly believes that we should be helping to empower younger generations to take over the reins.



    Date of Conversation - 4th September



    The Key Takeaways From This Episode

    [02.14] Interview begins

    [04.46] Reflections on personal responsibility for leading action on anti-racism this year

    [08.27] The pull of intellectual conservatism in leading a large organisation & white middle-class complacency

    [10.30] Staying engaged with anti-racism as a white leader and drawing on lessons from fighting other battles with privilege

    [14.50] It’s not enough to use your power kindly, you have to give some away

    [16.23] Leading as a feminist Chief Exec

    [18.45] Arriving at an established household charity and leading change

    [22.27] Bringing a campaigning voice to Shelter

    [24.05] How being CEO of Women’s Aid was an extremely challenging & transformative experience

    [26.30] Why Polly doesn’t lie awake at night with stress

    [29.08] Ways of dealing with pressure as a CEO

    [32.02] Strengths as a CEO, particularly the importance of communications

    [36.15] Approaching communicating during a lockdown

    [39.50] Prioritising Shelter being there to help those that most need them in the future

    [42.48] Legitimising Shelter’s claim to be a social justice organisation

    [43.17] Optimism in the Shelter team to successfully take the charity forward

    [44.16] Why young people make Polly feel hopeful and the respo...

    • 48 min
    Ep5 – Sufina Ahmad, Director of the John Ellerman Foundation

    Ep5 – Sufina Ahmad, Director of the John Ellerman Foundation

    In this episode we hear from Sufina Ahmad, Director of the John Ellerman Foundation, which supports small to medium-sized organisations to make a difference to people, society and the natural world, particularly focussing on the arts, environment and social action.



    Prior to joining John Ellerman, Sufina worked in corporate strategy and performance at the City of London Corporation. She has also held roles in policy and learning at the National Lottery Community Fund, including a secondment to the City Bridge Trust. Sufina holds trusteeships with Just for Kids Law and The Charterhouse and is also a fellow of the RSA.



    Host Joe Jenkins got to know Sufina through their involvement with the Chartered Institute of Fundraising - during his time as Chair of the Institute’s Annual National Fundraising Convention, Sufina was chairing a new expert panel on Equality, Diversity & Inclusion.  Happily, Sufina didn't hold back in challenging Joe and the conference board on the steps they could be taking to create a more diverse inclusive event - in a manner that was thought-provoking, constructive and always thoughtful.  Under Sufina's leadership, the panel went on to create the excellent Manifesto for Change, setting out a bold vision for a sector where everyone is the right fit.



    Topics in this episode include stepping into titled leadership roles, driving change from within existing systems, navigating 2020 and the impact of the global pandemic, the lessons to be learned from trusteeship alongside professional development, and why it’s crucial to empower others and opening the door for others to step in.



    Starting out with a degree in genetics and currently pursuing an executive MBA with Warwick Business School, Sufina describes herself as a specialist in generalism - a strength that is serving her well in her role at John Ellerman which works across a wide range of issues and causes.



    Sufina is optimistic about the future of the charity sector - hoping we will build on the important collaborations that have been necessitated by Covid-19 and the increasing recognition that unrestricted core funding is essential to strengthen charity impact.  Some important steps have been taken forward in 2020 - and we must all make sure they lead to long-lasting positive change.

    Date of Conversation - 4th August

    The Key Takeaways From This Episode

    [2.57] Interview Begins

    [03.54] First 100-day plans - and how they change when the world changes

    [04.55] Stepping into a Director role for the first time

    [11.00] What is unlocked in a ’Titled Leadership Role’

    [14.52] Being confident to seize new job opportunities when they arise

    [19.12] Understanding hierarchical systems while bringing your own values

    [21.00] My job as an empowering leader

    [23.28] Intentions and through-line - are we reaching a tipping point on equity, diversity, inclusion in the charity sector

    [26.28] The personal cost of talking publicly about “labels” and identity

    [31.45] The joys of trusteeship

    [38.50] Being a specialist in generalism

    [41.21] Strengths, passions and loving to learn

    [44.12] Work-life balance and finding time for an MBA

    [49.00] Responding to and staying open during the pandemic

    [52.26] Addressing issues with sector funding

    [54.58] Hopes for change and continued questioning within the charity sector

    Resources From This Episode



    * The John Ellerman Foundation – ellerman.org.uk

    * Chartered Institute of Fundraising - institute-of-fundraising.org.uk

    * Future Foundations UK - future-foundations.co.uk

    * Charity So White - charitysowhite.

    • 58 min
    Ep4 – Adeela Warley, Chief Executive of CharityComms

    Ep4 – Adeela Warley, Chief Executive of CharityComms

    Today we talk to Adeela Warley, Chief Executive of CharityComms, the membership organisation for charity communications professionals in UK Charities. She is also a member of ACEVO, The Marketing Society and Fellow of the RSA.



    Host Joe Jenkins first met Adeela a decade ago when he joined Friends of the Earth, where Adeela worked for over 20 years and they’ve been firm friends ever since. Adeela left her role as Head of Communications at FoE in early 2017 to take on the leadership of CharityComms.



    In the conversation, we hear Adeela sharing how she is coping with the challenge of TOO much on her mind!  As well as communications in a time of crisis and why we shouldn’t believe, or be too intimidated by, everything you read in leadership books.



    Adeela reflects on the last 3.5 years as a first-time CEO, why mentors and peers are so crucial, her strengths as a cautious leader, learning to be more honest and being unafraid to seek help.



    Looking to the future, Adeela is feeling positive about women leaders, sector collaboration and believes that at this time, more than ever, communication is the life-blood of charities wanting to change the world.

    Date of Conversation - 24 July

    The Key Takeaways From This Episode

    [2.10] Interview Begins

    [3.50] Charity Communicators in a time of crisis

    [7.17] From overdrive to structure and discipline during Covid

    [10.34] Understanding your charity eco-system, CEO mentors and peers

    [13.44] The motivations to become CEO of Charity Comms

    [17.37] Transition from leading a department to leading an organisation

    [24.05] Being honest about your vulnerabilities

    [23.17] Being seen and heard in leadership

    [32.10] Being a sector leader

    [37.31] Working in coalition

    [44.18] Why Communications can BE the change

    [45.05] Leadership can be learned but you need motivation and opportunity

    [48.52] Being a cautious leader, learning to be more honest and seek help

    [51.10] How the creativity and liberation of working remotely has brought the team together

    [54.12] The future of Charity Comms

    [56.24] Keep an eye on the prize - what are we here for

    [58.07] How human resilience and support can give us hope



    Resources From This Episode



    * CharityComms - charitycomms.org.uk

    * The CharityComms Re-launched Podcast

    * Adeela's Third Sector Articles

    * Small Charities Commission - smallcharities.org.uk

    * ACEVO - acevo.org.uk

    * NAVCA - navca.org.uk

    * Directory of Social Change - dsc.org.uk

    * The Frameworks institute - frameworksinstitute.org

    * Amy Cuddy Power Stance on YouTube

    * The Marketing Society - marketingsociety.com

    * RSA Fellowship - a href="https://www.thersa.org/fellowship" target="_blank" rel="noopener nore...

    • 1 hr
    Ep3 – Lucy Caldicott, Founder of ChangeOut & Councillor for London Borough of Lambeth

    Ep3 – Lucy Caldicott, Founder of ChangeOut & Councillor for London Borough of Lambeth

    This episode we talk with Lucy Caldicott, founder of ChangeOut and Councillor for London Borough of Lambeth.



    Lucy started out in the commercial world but soon realised it wasn't the path for her and moved into the charity sector, working in marketing and fundraising senior roles at the Prince's Trust, Jewish Care, VSO, and then Clic Sargent. Her next step was into executive leadership, first as interim CEO for Diversity Role Models and then as Chief Exec for Uprising.



    In 2018, Lucy was elected ward councillor for Stockwell in the London Borough of Lambeth while also founding the social purpose business ChangeOut - with the mission of diversifying the voluntary sector, seeking to make it more representative of society.



    In this episode, we chat about how you can best learn from the bad choices of former bosses, that it’s ok to be nervous, the need to rid the charity sector of bad behaviour - and getting out of the way of future leaders.



    There are some valuable tips - particularly the power of smiling, not looking at your phone at night and the importance of listening before you speak.



    We learn that Lucy is thoroughly enjoying her well-earnt current roles - making change happen and being her own boss (while possibly ruling out future job offers!). We discuss the different leadership styles Lucy has learned through the different roles in her career - leading from the front in politics, the importance of teamwork and how to manage upwards.



    Ultimately, despite the growing inequalities and challenges in our society that keep Lucy awake at night, she is keeping positive - hopeful that the Corona pandemic has finally woken people up to the need for change, and that through collaboration, charities will be relevant in the future.

    Date of Conversation - 10 July

    The Key Takeaways From This Episode

    [2.23] Interview Begins

    [3.30] The search for justice and ‘The Great Grace’ protest

    [7.17] White privilege and responsibilities for racism

    [9.55] Getting out of the way of young leaders

    [12.03] Different leadership approaches for different roles

    [18.53] How building trust and being authentic is fundamental in leadership

    [24.24] Moving into politics and learning quickly

    [27.50] Not giving up and people power

    [29.55] The veneer of confidence and how feeling nervous is ok

    [31.50] Smile and the world smiles with you

    [35.50] Nature vs Nurture in leadership

    [41.00] Widening your frame of reference

    [43.27] The future for the charity sector

    [49.20] The dangers of complacency amongst the ‘do-gooders’

    [53.23] Taking risks and collaborating for a better future

    [55.45] The hope that the pandemic has woken people up to the need for change

    Resources From This Episode



    * ChangeOut - changeout.org

    * Fundraising Chat Facebook Group - Fundraising Chat

    * Lucy on Facebook - fb.com/LucyforLabour

    * Institute of Fundraising Conference 2020

    * Lucy’s Talk at the Conference -  What are we really talking about when we talk about diversity and inclusion?

    * Simon Sinek Talk - a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3EPLItTf-QU&feature=youtu.

    • 58 min
    Ep2 - Mark Russell, CEO of The Children's Society

    Ep2 - Mark Russell, CEO of The Children's Society

    Today’s guest is Mark Russell, CEO of The Children’s Society, trustee at the Church Of England and RSA Fellow.



    Mark started out as a youth worker in his home country of Northern Ireland, in a divided town bringing young people together in the run-up to the Good Friday agreement. At the age of 30, he was appointed CEO of the Church Army, a social justice charity working in some of the most deprived areas across the UK and Ireland, a position he held for 13 years.



    Mark joined Children’s Society in 2019 - and now has the pleasure of being OTMO host Joe Jenkins’ boss!



    We speak on a range of topics including burning the candle at all 4 ends, building resilience as a leader, white privilege, the stereotypes of CEOS and the importance of both family time and BBQs.



    There is also a great Chief Exec/Lion King analogy and talk about being an extrovert (with introvert tendencies) while dealing with life and death during the Covid-19 pandemic.

    Date of Conversation - 26 June

    The Key Takeaways From This Episode

    [2.15] Conversation Begins

    [3.15] Balancing time with family/friends vs work

    [5.25] Consequences of taking on too much

    [9.19] Leaders are not superheroes

    [11.02] “I can’t breathe” - #blacklivesmatter & using white privilege

    [17.57] Challenging the traditional stereotype of a Chief Exec

    [21.57] What can only a Chief Exec do

    [26.00] The importance of organisational culture

    [32.35] Leading through presence and leading through absence.

    [40.00] How Mark builds his resilience

    [43.03] What is keeping Mark awake at night

    [44.58] Being an extrovert in a time of a pandemic

    [51.30] Three kinds of charity will emerge from the pandemic

    [56.25] Why Mark is filled with hope for the future

    Resources From This Episode



    * Children's Society - childrenssociety.org.uk

    * Third Sector article with Mark on his first year at The Children's Society:

    'Constant communication has carried our charity through lockdown – and tragedy'

    * Church Army - churcharmy.org

    * RSA Fellowship - thersa.org/fellowship

    • 1 hr 2 min
    Ep1 - Stephen Hale, Refugee Action Chief Exec

    Ep1 - Stephen Hale, Refugee Action Chief Exec

    Today’s guest is Refugee Action Chief Exec, Stephen Hale. Voted Charity Chief Executive of the Year in 2019, Stephen is greatly respected across the charity sector and has much to share on the lessons he has learned in leadership.



    In our conversation, we explore the effects of Covid-19, building self-confidence in leadership, how the issues raised by #BlackLivesMatter is prompting debate about diversity and inclusion within the charity sector, and the moral obligation to put the cause before your own organisation.



    We also discuss collaboration amongst charities, both the struggles and opportunities, along with Stephen’s own leadership strengths – and why he loves winning. Reflecting on what helps Stephen to succeed, we discuss the breadth of his experience, recognise the value of space to reflect and how his love of cycling has helped Stephen to clear his mind and clarify ideas. And why he remains hopeful.

    Date of Conversation - 19 June

    The Key Takeaways From This Episode

    [2:47] What’s on Stephen’s mind?

    [4:30] How Covid affects everything

    [12:15] Rebuilding self-confidence

    [17:19] Privilege, power and EDI in the charity sector

    [26:13] Cause before organisation – offering wider leadership

    [31:09] Stephen’s strengths as a leader

    [36:20] How wide experience can inform successful leadership

    [39:30] Creating space to reflect

    [44:40] Hope for the future

    Resources From This Episode



    * Refugee Action - refugee-action.org.uk

    * Forum for the Future - forumforthefuture.org

    * Samworth Foundation - samworthfoundation.org.uk

    * ACEVO Report - Home Truths: Undoing racism and delivering real diversity in the charity sector

    * Voice4England - voice4change-england.co.uk

    * For background on the host, Joe Jenkins, and his reasons for creating the podcast see our About OTMO page.

    * Follow 'On The Mind Of' on Facebook and Twitter.

    • 51 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
13 Ratings

13 Ratings

@Dwc1 ,

Learning listen

I’ve found these really helpful, honest and insightful.

AliceRathx ,

My lockdown listen

I love loved listening to the podcast so far, I binged the first few episodes during lockdown! The guests are incredible and the conversation topics give you lots to think about

Jack T Burton ,

Timely and essential listening

This is one of the best social change podcast series available and absolutely essential for charity leaders present and future. Joe Jenkins effortlessly marries an easy charm with an incisive interviewing technique that crystallises the guests’ brilliant insights and innovative approaches.

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