8 episodes

Readings, discussion, and debate from the Poetry Centre with poets and critics. Find out more on our website or follow us on social media @brookespoetry

Oxford Brookes Poetry Centre Podcast Oxford Brookes Poetry Centre

    • Books
    • 5.0 • 2 Ratings

Readings, discussion, and debate from the Poetry Centre with poets and critics. Find out more on our website or follow us on social media @brookespoetry

    Maya C. Popa talks to Niall Munro about her collection American Faith

    Maya C. Popa talks to Niall Munro about her collection American Faith

    Maya C. Popa is an American poet, researcher, editor, and teacher who has published two pamphlets: The Bees Have Been Canceled in 2017, and You Always Wished the Animals Would Leave in 2018. Most recently, her first full-length collection, American Faith, was published by Sarabande Books in 2019. The book was the runner-up in the Kathryn A. Morton Prize judged by Ocean Vuong and the winner of the 2020 North American Book Award from the Poetry Society of Virginia. She is the recipient of awards from the Poetry Foundation, the Oxford Poetry Society, and Munster Literature Centre in Cork, Ireland, among others. Maya is the Poetry Reviews Editor at Publishers Weekly, an English teacher and director of the Creative Writing Program at the Nightingale-Bamford school in NYC, and is currently pursuing her PhD on the role of wonder in poetry at Goldsmiths, University of London. As you’ll be able to tell from the recording, Niall Munro spoke with Maya in late May whilst the Covid-19 lockdown was still in place in New York City where she lives. They talked about three of the poems from American Faith: 'The Government Has Been Canceled', 'Meditation Having Felt and Forgotten', and 'Knockout Mouse Model'. You can read the poems that Maya discusses on the Poetry Centre’s Podcasts page, and you can order a copy of American Faith from Sarabande Books and the Poetry Book Society, as well as the usual retailers. You can also visit Maya’s own website and follow her on Twitter. Do tell us what you think of the podcast by e-mailing us or getting in touch via social media - we’re on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. Thank you for listening!

    • 52 min
    Jennifer Wong talks to Niall Munro

    Jennifer Wong talks to Niall Munro

    Jennifer Wong was born and brought up in Hong Kong. She now lives in the UK and works as a writer, translator and teacher. She has published three collections: *Goldfish* (2013), Diary of a Miu Miu Salesgirl - a pamphlet with Bitter Melon Poetry (2019), and most recently Letters Home 回 家, published by Nine Arches Press in 2020, which was selected as a Wild Card Choice by the Poetry Book Society. In this podcast, Jennifer reads and discusses four poems: ‘of butterflies’, ‘Girls from my class’, ‘My father, who taught me how to fold serviette penguins’, and ‘Truths 2.0’. You can read the poems that Jennifer discusses and find out more about her work on the Podcasts page on the Poetry Centre website – just search for ‘Oxford Brookes Poetry’. In our discussion, Jennifer explores topics such as the relationship between her past and present life, how far the Chinese family might be perceived as ‘a perfect state of happiness’, her use of Cantonese and English in the poems, her formal choices, and the challenges of writing about the recent Hong Kong protests. Do tell us what you think of the podcast by e-mailing us or getting in touch via social media - we’re on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram. Thank you for listening!

    • 49 min
    Doyali Islam talks to Niall Munro

    Doyali Islam talks to Niall Munro

    This interview was recorded in late November 2019 when Doyali visited the UK, and in it Doyali discusses the tensions in her poetry, how her work deals with chronic illness, the innovative formal choices that she makes for her poems in heft, the link between poetry, art and healing, and how she represents her family in her writing. She discusses three poems, all of which you can read on the Podcasts page of the Poetry Centre website: ‘sagittarius {the archer}’, ‘bhater mondo’, and ‘flare’.

    • 49 min
    Mariah Whelan talks to Niall Munro

    Mariah Whelan talks to Niall Munro

     Mariah is a poet, teacher and interdisciplinary researcher from Oxford. Her debut collection, a novel-in-sonnets called the love i do to you, was published in November 2019 by Eyewear. Poems from the novel were shortlisted for The Bridport Prize, The Melita Hume Prize and the manuscript won the AM Heath Prize. A second collection of poems the rafters are still burning which explores writing, constructions of whiteness and museum archives is forthcoming from Dancing Girl Press in 2020. 

    • 46 min
    Peter Bearder talks to Niall Munro

    Peter Bearder talks to Niall Munro

     Peter Bearder may be better known to many as Pete the Temp. A spoken word poet, comic, and musician, Peter has appeared on television and radio, at festivals around the UK, and internationally with the British Council. He has been the National Poetry Slam Champion and in 2018 was awarded the Golden Hammer Award for services to spoken word. His poetry has appeared in a collection called Numbered Boxes (Burning Eye Books, 2017). As well as recordings of Peter’s performances and his terrific selection of interviews with spoken word artists, his website also features his 2015 TEDx talk about why every school should have a spoken word artist. Peter’s new book, Stage Invasion: Poetry and the Spoken Word Renaissance (Out-Spoken Press, 2019), is a fantastic resource for anyone interested in the recent history and development of spoken word and will be required reading for anyone studying or fascinated by the art. The book covers a tremendous amount of ground, and in this podcast Peter and Niall discuss a number of the issues raised in Stage Invasion, such as Peter’s own first experience of a poetry slam, how he thinks about the world of spoken word now, and recent well-publicised criticisms of spoken word. They also talk about Peter’s own poetry and how he performs it, and the value of spoken word for society.

    • 42 min
    James Arthur

    James Arthur

    James was born in Connecticut and grew up in Toronto. His poems have appeared in many magazines and journals, including ‘The New Yorker’, ‘Poetry’, ‘The New York Review of Books’, the ‘London Review of Books’, and ‘The Walrus’. He has been awarded numerous scholarships and fellowships, such as the Amy Lowell Travelling Poetry Scholarship, a Hodder Fellowship, a Stegner Fellowship, a Discovery/The Nation Prize, a Fulbright Scholarship to Northern Ireland, and a visiting fellowship at Exeter College, Oxford. He lives in Baltimore and teaches in the Writing Seminars at Johns Hopkins University. James’s first book of poetry Charms Against Lightning, was published by Copper Canyon Press in 2012, and his chapbook, Hundred Acre Wood, came out in 2018 with Anstruther Press. His second full collection, The Suicide’s Son, was published in spring of 2019 by Véhicule Press in Montreal. In this podcast, Niall and James discuss knowledge and childhood, living in Canada and the United States, drone warfare, and the experience of being a new parent. In particular, we talk about three of James’s poems: ‘Ode to an Encyclopedia’, ‘Drone’, and ‘Goodnight Moon’, all of which you can read below.

    • 28 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
2 Ratings

2 Ratings

Top Podcasts In Books